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THE EFFECT OF RADIATION ON THE CORROSION OF METALS BY WATER. (Problem No. 322 MLC 2213)

Description: Long-time tests have been made on the effect of various types of radiation on the corrosion of 2S aluminum in simulated W water. In no case was any acceleration of corrosion by the radiation observed; the effect of radiation, if any, appeared to be a protective one. Deuteron irradiation did accelerate the corrosion of mild steel at low flow rates in hot water of pH 6 to 7, but no appreciable effect was observed with copper, stainless steel, or tuballoy. The general theory of the effect of radiation on corrosion is discussed, with the conclusion that no acceleration of corrosion by radiation is to be expected in most cases of practical interest. (auth)
Date: July 6, 1944
Creator: Allen, A.O.; Bowman, M.C.; Goldowski, N.; Larson, R.G. & Treiman, L.

Geological and Geophysical Survey of Fluorspar Areas in Hardin County, Illinois

Description: From abstract: Pt 1. The present work seems to confirm the genetic theory previously published, namely that [Illinois Cave in Rock] deposits were formed by ascending solutions. These solutions probably followed minor fissures that connected below with larger fissures, which in turn probably connected with a major fault zone. It is believed that where such minor fissures extended upward only to the shale or other impervious cap rock, or were greatly reduced in size where they penetrated such beds, the solutions spread laterally along the contact and along the limestone beds beneath it and replaced the limestone. Pt 2. This report is a presentation of the results of an electrical-resistivity survey conducted in the fluorspar-bearing areas of Hardin County, Ill., principally during the field seasons of 1934 and 1935.
Date: 1944
Creator: Currier, Louis W.; Wagner, Oscar Emil, Jr. & Hubbert, M. King

Manganese Deposits in the Artillery Mountains Region, Mohave County, Arizona

Description: From abstract: The manganese deposits of the Artillery Mountains region lie within an area of about 25 square miles between the Artillery and Rawhide Mountains, on the west side of the Bill Williams River in west-central Arizona. The richest croppings are on the northeast side of this area, among the foothills of the Artillery Mountains. They are 6 to 10 miles from Alamo. The nearest shipping points are Congress, about 50 miles to the east, and Aguila, about 50 miles to the southeast. The principal manganese deposits are part of a sequence of alluvial fan and playa material, probably of early Pliocene age, which were laid down in a fault basin. They are overlain by later Pliocene (?) basalt flows and sediments and by Quaternary basalt and alluvium. The Pliocene (?) rocks are folded into a shallow composite syncline that occupies the valley between the Artillery and Rawhide Mountains, and the folded rocks along either side of the valley, together with the overlying Quaternary basalt, are broken by faults that have produced a group of horsts, grabens, and step-fault blocks.
Date: 1944
Creator: Lasky, Samuel G. & Webber, N. B.