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The Uranium, Tin, and Copper Deposits at Majuba Hill, Pershing County, Nevada

Description: From abstract: Uranium is associated with copper and tin ores in the Majuba Hill area, Antelope mining district, in the central part of the Antelope Range, Pershing County, Nev. About 23, 000 tons of copper and 200 tons of tin ore, a small quantity of lead-silver ore, and some arsenic-silver ore have been produced from the Majuba Hill mine, the Last Chance mine, and a mine in sec. 34, T. 33 N., R. 31 E.
Date: December 1952
Creator: Thurston, Ralph H. & Trites, Albert F., Jr.

Design of the National Bureau of Standards Isotropic Magnetic Field Meter (MFM-10) 300 kHz to 100 MHz

Description: From introduction: In this report the following will he discussed: (1) design consideration of the broadband magnetic field sensor, (2) overall design of the magnetic field meter, (3) performance of the meter, (4) calibration and operating procedures, (5) alignment and adjustment procedures, and (6) summary and conclusions.
Date: October 1985
Creator: Cruz, J. E.; Driver, L. D. & Kanda, Motohisa

Possible Estimation Methodologies for Electromagnetic Field Distributions in Complex Environments

Description: Abstract: The problem of measuring and characterizing complicated multiple-source, multiple-frequency electromagnetic environments is becoming more important and more difficult as electrical devices proliferate. This paper outlines three general approaches to the problem which are currently under investigation at the National Bureau of Standards. The three approaches are: 1) a statistical treatment of the spatial distribution of electromagnetic field intensities, 2) a numerical computation using a finite-difference (or lattice) form of the electromagnetic action functional, and 3) use of a directional probe to scan a volume. All three methods are still in the development stage, but each appears promising.
Date: March 1985
Creator: Kanda, Motohisa; Randa, J. & Nahman, N. S.

Reconnaissance for Radioactive Deposits in Southeastern Alaska, 1952

Description: From abstract: Reconnaissance for radioactive deposits in southeastern Alaska in 1952 was centered in three localities: the northern part of Prince of Wales Island and parts of adjacent islands, the Taku Harbor-Point Astley district, and the Hyder area. Significant concentrations of radioactive minerals were found only in the vicinity of Salmon Bay on the northeastern shore of Prince of Wales Island. In this area radioactive carbonate-hematite veins occur along the coast for about 8 miles. The veins are generally short, irregular, and lenticular, but a few can be traced for more than 300 feet between the low-tide line and the forest cover. The width of the veins normally ranges from less than 1 inch to 2.5 feet; several, however, are 5 to 10 feet wide.
Date: 1958
Creator: Houston, Joseph R.; Bates, Robert Glenn; Velikanje, Robert S. & Wedow, Helmuth, Jr.

Ordovician Graptolites of the Basin Ranges in California, Nevada, Utah, and Idaho

Description: From introduction: This report presents a summary of the graptolite faunas of the Basin Ranges as known from the collections of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Departments of Geology of the University of California at Los Angeles and Utah State University. The collections were made in the period 1872-1958, but only a very small number of specimens have been described or illustrated in the 80 or so years elapsed.
Date: 1963
Creator: Ross, Reuben James, Jr. & Berry, William B. N.

Chromite and Other Mineral Deposits in Serpentine Rocks of the Piedmont Upland, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Delaware

Description: From abstract: The Piedmont Upland in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Delaware is about 160 miles long and at the most 50 miles wide. Rocks that underlie the province are the Baltimore gneiss of Precambrian age and quartzite, gneiss, schist, marble, phyllite, and greenstone, which make up the Glenarm series of early Paleozoic(?) age. These are intruded by granitic, gabbroic, and ultramafic igneous rocks. Most of the ultramafic rocks, originally peridotite, pyroxenite, and dunite, have been partly or completely altered to serpentine and talc; they are all designated by the general term serpentine. The bodies of serpentine are commonly elongate and conformable with the enclosing rocks.
Date: 1960
Creator: Pearre, Nancy C. & Heyl, Allen V., Jr.

Bentonite Deposits of the Northern Black Hills District Wyoming, Montana, and South Dakota

Description: From abstract: The northern Black Hills bentonite mining district includes parts of Crook County, Wyo., Carter County, Mont., and Butte County, S. Dak. Within this district, many beds of bentonite occur interspersed with sedimentary strata of Cretaceous age that have an average total thickness of about 3,000 feet and consist chiefly of marine shale, marl, and argillaceous sandstone. The bentonite beds occur in formations ranging upward from the Newcastle sandstone to the lower part of the Mitten black shale member of the Pierre shale. Tertiary (?) and Quaternary deposits of gravel, sand, and silt are present on extensive terraces, and deposits of such materials also extend along stream courses in all parts of the district.
Date: 1962
Creator: Knechtel, Maxwell M. & Patterson, Sam H.

Geology and Mineral Deposits of the Carlile Quadrangle, Crook County, Wyoming

Description: From introduction: Geologic mapping of the Carlile quadrangle, which includes one of several uranium-producing areas in northeastern Wyoming, was undertaken to provide a detailed geologic map that could be used as an aid to further exploration for uranium deposits; to study in detail the known uranium deposits to determine whether or not there are any relations among structure, stratigraphy, lithology, and uranium deposits; and to outline, insofar as possible, areas favorable for more detailed exploration for uranium.
Date: 1961
Creator: Bergendahl, M. H.; Davis, Robert E. & Izett, Glen Arthur

Geology and Fluorspar Deposits, Northgate District, Colorado

Description: From abstract: The fluorspar deposits in the Northgate district, Jackson County, Colo., are among the largest in Western United States. The mines were operated intermittently during the 1920's and again during World War II, but production during these early periods of operation was not large. Mining was begun on a larger scale in 1951, and the district has assumed a prominent position among the fluorspar producers in the United States. Within the Northgate district, Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks crop out largely in the Medicine Bow Mountains, and later sedimentary rocks underlie North Park and fill old stream valleys in the mountains.
Date: 1960
Creator: Steven, Thomas August

Tertiary Geology and Oil-Shale Resources of the Piceance Creek Basin, Between the Colorado and White Rivers, Northwestern Colorado

Description: From introduction: The greatest known potential oil resource in the world occurs in the oil shale of the Green River formation, and the richest and thickest deposits occur within the area of this report. The purpose of this investigation was to obtain data on the stratigraphic distribution and areal extent of the oil-shale beds and to estimate the potential oil resources in the area.
Date: 1961
Creator: Donnell, John R.

Geology and Mineral Deposits of the St. Regis-Superior Area, Mineral County, Montana

Description: From introduction: The St. Regis-Superior area was studied during the summers of 1953 and 1954 as a part of geologic investigations by the U.S. Geologic Survey in and near the Coeur d'Alene district. The object of the present work was primarily threefold: to ascertain the main structural features in the area, with particular attention to the Osburn fault zone; to investigate the mineral deposits; and to determine the stratigraphic relations of the rocks.
Date: 1960
Creator: Campbell, Arthur Byron

Areal Geology of the Little Cone Quadrangle, Colorado

Description: From abstract: The Little Cone quadrangle includes an area of about 59 square miles in eastern San Miguel County in southwestern Colorado. The quadrangle contains features characteristic of both the Colorado Plateaus physiographic province and the San Juan Mountains, and it has been affected by geologic events and processes of two different geologic environments.
Date: 1960
Creator: Bush, Alfred Lerner; Marsh, Owen Thayer & Taylor, Richard B.

Manganese Deposits in the Drum Mountains, Juab and Millard Counties, Utah

Description: From abstract: The Drum Mountains are in west-central Utah 30 miles northwest of Delta, between the Sevier Desert on the east and Whirlwind Valley on the west. It is a typically barren desert range comprising a westward-tilted structural unit in which is exposed as much as 9,000 feet of quartzite (Cambrian and Precambrian?) and 3,000 feet of carbonate rocks of Cambrian age. These beds, which strike northward and dip west, are cut by myriad east- to northeast trending faults with displacements of a few feet to a few thousand feet. Quartz monzonite dikes, pebble dikes, and vein deposits are present locally along the faults. The Cambrian rocks are overlain unconformably by volcanic rocks of probable Tertiary age.
Date: 1961
Creator: Crittenden, Max D., Jr.; Straczek, John A. & Roberts, Ralph Jackson

Mineral Resources of the Sleeping Giant Wilderness Study Area, Lewis and Clark County, Montana

Description: From abstract: A mineral resource survey was conducted in 1987 by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines to evaluate mineral resources (known) and mineral resource potential (undiscovered) of the Sleeping Giant Wilderness Study Area (MT-075-111) in Lewis and Clark County, Montana. The only economic resource in the study area is an inferred 1.35-million-ton reserve of decorative stone (slate); a small gold placer resource is subeconomic. A high resource potential for decorative slate exists directly adjacent to the area of identified slate resource and in the northeastern part of the study area. The rest of the study area has a low potential for decorative slate. The westernmost part of the study area has a moderate resource potential for copper and associated silver in strata-bound deposits in green beds and limestone; potential is low in the rest of the study area.
Date: 1991
Creator: Tysdal, Russell G.; Reynolds, Mitchell W.; Carlson, Robert R. & Peters, Thomas J.

Mineral Resources of the Turtle Mountains Wilderness Study Area, San Bernardino County, California

Description: From abstract: At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, approximately 105,200 acres of the Turtle Mountains Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-307) were evaluated for mineral resources (known) and resource potential (undiscovered). In this report, the area studied is referred to as "the wilderness study area" or simply "the study area"; any reference to the Turtle Mountain Wilderness Study Area refers only to that part of the wilderness study area for which a mineral survey was requested by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. The wilderness study area is in southeastern San Bernardino County, Calif. Gold, silver, copper, and lead have been mined within and adjacent to the study area.
Date: 1988
Creator: Howard, Keith A.; Nielson, Jane E.; Simpson, Robert W.; Hazlett, Richard W.; Alminas, Henry V.; Nakata, John K. et al.

Mineral Resources of the Weepah Spring Wilderness Study Area, Lincoln and Nye Counties, Nevada

Description: From summary: The USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) and the USBM (U.S. Bureau of Mines) studied the mineral resource potential of 50,499 acres of the 61,137-acre Weepah Spring Wilderness Study Area (NV-040-246), Lincoln and Nye Counties, Nev., at the request of the BLM (U.S. Bureau of Land Management). In this report, the area studied is referred to as the "wilderness study area" or the "study area." Field studies of the area were conducted during summer 1984 by USBM geologists and during spring 1984 and fall 1985 by USGS geologists, geochemists, and geophysicists.
Date: 1987
Creator: Du Bray, Edward A.; Blank, H. Richard, Jr. & Turner, Robert L.

Mineral Resources of the Willow Creek and Skull Creek Wilderness Study Areas, Moffat County, Colorado

Description: Abstract: The Willow Creek Wilderness Study Area (CO-010-002) and the Skull Creek Wilderness Study Area (C-010-003), which contain 13,368 acres and 13,739 acres, respectively, are in northwest Colorado near the Utah border. There are no identified resources in either of the study areas. The study areas have low resource potential for undiscovered uranium, vanadium, copper, and all other metals; oil and gas; and coal.
Date: 1990
Creator: Van Loenen, Richard E.; Folger, Helen W. & Kulik, Dolores M.

Mineral Resources of the Farlin Creek Wilderness Study Area, Beaverhead County, Montana

Description: Abstract: The Farlin Creek Wilderness Study Area (MT-076-034) is in the south-central Pioneer Mountains about 24 miles west-northwest of Dillon, Beaverhead County, southwestern Montana. At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, an area of 610 acres (less than 1 square mile) was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines in 1984. The area contains no mines or prospects, no visible evidence of mineralization, and no identified mineral resources. Geophysical evidence suggests that three parts of the area have moderate mineral resource potential for undiscovered resources of molybdenum. The entire area has a low resource potential for all other metals and for all nonmetals, fuels, and geothermal energy.
Date: 1987
Creator: Pearson, Robert Carl; Hassemer, Jerry H. & Hanna, William F.

Mineral Resources of the White Rock Range Wilderness Study Area, Lincoln County, Nevada, and Beaver and Iron Counties, Utah

Description: From summary: The White Rock Range Wilderness Study Area (NV-040-202/UT-040-216) is in Lincoln County, Nevada, and Beaver and Iron Counties, Utah, along the southern Nevada-Utah state line. Ursine, the town nearest to the study area, is about 15 mi (miles) southwest of the study area; the larger town of Pioche is about 30 mi southwest of the study area on Nevada Highway 322. A joint mineral resource appraisal of the 23,625 acre wilderness study area was completed in the summers of 1984 and 1985 by the U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Bureau of Mines. The White Rock Range Wilderness Study Area has no identified mineral resources and has low mineral resource potential for metals; the potential for oil and gas, coal, and geothermal energy is also low.
Date: 1986
Creator: Toth, Margo I.; Stoneman Rebecca G.; Blank, H. Richard, Jr. & Gese Diann D.

Mineral Resources of the Parsnip Peak Wilderness Study Area, Lincoln County, Nevada

Description: From summary: The Parsnip Peak (NV-040-206) Wilderness Study Area in Lincoln County, Nevada, is 10 mi (miles) northeast of the small mining town of Pioche. A mineral resource study of the area was completed in the summers of 1984 and 1985 by the U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Bureau of Mines. A small area of limestone and dolomite on the western side of the wilderness study area has high mineral resource potential for arsenic, antimony, mercury, and gold. The rest of the Parsnip Peak Wilderness Study Area has low mineral resource potential for metals, oil and gas, coal, and geothermal energy.
Date: 1987
Creator: Toth, Margo I.; Stoneman, R. G.; Blank, H. Richard, Jr. & Gese, Diann D.

Mineral Resources, Geology, and Geophysics of the Worthington Mountains Wilderness Study Area, Lincoln County, Nevada

Description: From summary: The U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines studied 26,587 acres of the Worthington Mountains Wilderness Study Area (NV-040-242) in Lincoln County, Nevada. The study of this acreage was requested by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. In this report, the studied area is called "wilderness study area" or just "study area." Field studies of the area were conducted during fall 1983 and spring 1984 by Bureau of Mines personnel and during fall 1984 and spring 1985 by geologists and geophysicists of the Geological Survey. Metallic mineral (Cu, Pb, Zn, Au, Ag, W) resource potential within the study area is moderate, with level-B certainty, in the northernmost part, and it is low, with level-C certainty, in the remainder of the area. Identified resources of commodities with industrial applications occur in the area. Energy resources are unknown; accordingly, their resource potential is considered low, with level-B certainty.
Date: 1986
Creator: Du Bray, Edward A.; Blank, H. Richard, Jr. & Wood, Robert H., II

Mineral Resources of the Far South Egans Wilderness Study Area, Lincoln and Nye Counties, Nevada

Description: From summary: During 1983 and 1984, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted field investigations to assess the mineral resource potential and appraise the identified resources of a part of the Far South Egans (NV-040-172) Wilderness Study Area. The area studied encompasses about 63.5 mi2 (square miles) (42,316 acres) in Lincoln and Nye Counties, Nevada, and is in the southern part of the Egan Range of east-central Nevada.
Date: 1987
Creator: Hedlund, David Carl; Davies, R. C.; Hovorka, Dirk S. & Blank, H. Richard, Jr.

Mineral Resources of the Coal Canyon, Spruce Canyon, and Flume Canyon Wilderness Study Areas, Grand County, Utah

Description: From abstract: The Coal Canyon (UT-060-1000), Spruce Canyon (UT-060-100D), and Flume Canyon (UT-060-100B) Wilderness Study Areas are in the Book Cliffs in Grand County, eastern Utah. Demonstrated coal reserves totaling 22,060,800 short tons, and demonstrated subeconomic coal resources totaling 39,180,000 short tons are in the Coal Canyon Wilderness Study Area. Also, inferred subeconomic coal resources totaling 143,954,000 short tons are within the Coal Canyon Wilderness Study Area. No known deposits of industrial minerals are in any of the wilderness study areas. All three of the wilderness study areas have a high resource potential for undiscovered deposits of coal and for undiscovered oil and gas.
Date: 1990
Creator: Dickerson, Robert P.; Gaccetta, Jerry D.; Kulik, Dolores M. & Kreidler, Terry J.

Mineral Resources of the Paria-Hackberry Wilderness Study Area, Kane County, Utah

Description: From abstract: The Paria-Hackberry Wilderness Study Area, in central Kane County, southern Utah, is a region of generally flat-lying, gently folded sedimentary rocks, bounded on the east by the east-dipping limb of the East Kaibab monocline and cut by sheer-walled, narrow canyons. The area selected for study by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management totaled 94,642 acres (148 square miles); because of uncertainty as to final boundaries, the U.S. Geological Survey studied an additional contiguous 41,180 acres (64 square miles).
Date: 1991
Creator: Bell, Henry, III; Bush, Alfred Lerner & Turner, Robert L.