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Geology and Mineral Resources of the Northern Part of the North Cascades National Park, Washington

Description: Introduction: This report was started as part of a study of the North Cascade Primitive Area, an area of about 830,000 acres, which adjoined the Canadian border on the north and which extended from Mount Shuksan on the west to Rock Mountain on the east. In the fall of 1968, Public Law 90-544, 90th Cong., reclassified the North Cascade Primitive Area and certain other national forest lands and created the North Cascades National Park, the Ross Lake National Recreation Area, and the Pasayten Wilderness. Ross Lake National Recreational Area, a corridor 21/2-4 miles wide along the Skagit River and its dammed portions, Ross, Diablo, and Gorge Lakes, separates the park into two parts and separates the northern part of the park from the Pasayten Wilderness. The present study concerns those parts of North Cascades National Park and the Ross Lake National Recreation Area that are north of Skagit River and west of Ross Lake (fig. 1), as well as part of the Mount Baker National Forest west of the park (pl. 2).
Date: 1972
Creator: Staatz, Mortimer Hay; Tabor, R. W.; Weis, Paul L.; Robertson, Jacques F.; Van Noy, Ronald M. & Pattee, Eldon C.
Item Type: Report

Revisions in Stratigraphic Nomenclature of the Columbia River Basalt Group

Description: From abstract: New stratigraphic nomenclature for units within the Columbia River Basalt Group is introduced to revise and expand that currently in use; it is based largely on subdivisions made informally by T. L. Wright, M. J. Grolier, and D. A. Swanson in 1973. The Yakima Basalt is raised to subgroup status, and three formations-the Grande Ronde Basalt, Wanapum Basalt, and Saddle Mountains Basalt, in order of decreasing age-are defined within it.
Date: 1979
Creator: Swanson, Donald A.; Bentley, Robert Donald; Hooper, P. R. & Wright, Thomas L.
Item Type: Report

Stratigraphic Nomenclature of the Central Santa Monica Mountains, Los Angeles County, California

Description: From abstract: The stratigraphic nomenclature of the central Santa Monica Mountains is revised to conform with present knowledge of the age, distribution, and stratigraphic relations of about 35 bedrock units. The revision is based on 1:12,000-scale mapping of the entire stratigraphic sequence and its facies, the position and stage assignment of abundant fossils, and contact relations.
Date: June 16, 1979
Creator: Yerkes, R. F. & Campbell, Russell H.
Item Type: Report

Geology and Ore Deposits of the Picher Field, Oklahoma and Kansas

Description: From Purpose and Scope of Report: This report presents a detailed description of the ore deposits of the Picher field and all phases of geology having a bearing on their localization, origin, and the search for them. It is based mainly on work done by the U.S. Geological Survey, but it also incorporates pertinent data from published literature, especially from the outstanding work of George M. Fowler and associates, and some unpublished data obtained from the geologic staffs of the mining companies.
Date: 1970
Creator: McKnight, Edwin Thor & Fischer, Richard P.
Item Type: Report

Platinum Deposits of the Goodnews Bay District, Alaska

Description: From abstract: Platinum placers were discovered in 1926 in a small area south of Goodnews Bay, in southwestern Alaska. Beginning in 1927, the placers were worked for 7 years by small-scale mining methods; in later years dragline excavators and a dredge were utilized. These deposits are important, not only because they are of high grade but because they are the only commercial source of platinum metals in the United States. This report details the deposits in this district.
Date: 1976
Creator: Mertie, John Beaver, Jr.
Item Type: Report

Stratigraphy and Geologic History of the Montana Group and Equivalent Rocks, Montana, Wyoming, and North and South Dakota

Description: From introduction: This is a progress report on regional stratigraphic and paleontologic studies of the Upper Cretaceous Montana Group and equivalent rocks in the northern part of the western interior of the United States. It presents preliminary data on the positions of strandlines during a 14-m.y. (million year) span of the Late Cretaceous as well as our interpretations of the geologic history of this period.
Date: 1973
Creator: Gill, James R. & Cobban, William Aubrey
Item Type: Report

The Lyon Station-Paulins Kill Nappe : the Frontal Structure of the Musconetcong Nappe System in Eastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey

Description: From abstract: Geologic and aeromagnetic data show that a major tectonic unit underlies rocks of the Musconetcong nappe in the Great Valley of eastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This structure, the Lyon Station-Paulins Kill nappe, can be traced from Lyon Station, Pa., at least to Branchville, N.J., a distance of about 120 km. The nappe has a core of Precambrian crystalline rocks as shown by an aeromagnetic anomaly that has the same signature as the outcropping Precambrian rocks of the Musconetcong nappe. This core extends at least 70 km east from Lyon Station to Bangor, Pa., the eastern limit of the aeromagnetic survey. This report details the frontal structure of this system.
Date: 1978
Creator: Drake, Avery Ala, Jr.
Item Type: Report

Stratigraphy and Microfaunas of the Oquirrh Group in the Southern East Tintic Mountains, Utah

Description: Abstract: The Oquirrh Group of Pennsylvanian and Permian age in the southern East Tintic Mountains, Utah, is more than 15,000 feet (4,572 m) thick and consists of an incomplete section of the West Canyon Limestone (Morrowan) 960 feet (293 m) thick, a nearly complete section of the Butterfield Peaks Formation (Atokan(?) and Des Moinesian) about 5,800 feet (1,768 m) thick, a complete section of the Bingham Mine Formation (Missourian) 3,200-3,400 feet thick (975-1,036 m), and a complete section of the newly named Furner Valley Limestone (Missourian to Wolfcampian) 5,000-6,000 feet (1,524-1,829 m) thick. The formations below the Furner Valley Limestone are generally similar to their counterparts in their type areas in the central and southern Oquirrh Mountains but are somewhat thinner and less arenaceous. The Furner Valley Limestone, more than 90 percent carbonate, is apparently unique. Strata of the same age in the Wasatch, Stansbury, Cedar, Hogup, and Promontory Mountains in Utah are all considerably arenaceous; in the southern Oquirrh Mountains in the upper plate of the Midas thrust fault they have been largely removed by erosion. The Oquirrh Group in the East Tintic Mountains is overlain by the Diamond Creek Sandstone; the latter, in turn, is overlain by the Park City Formation. No units lithologically resembling the Kirkman Limestone of the Wasatch Mountains are recognized. Fusulinids are common in the Butterfield Peaks and Bingham Mine Formations and are present throughout the Furner Valley Limestone. The faunas are comparable to those of the Oquirrh Group in the Oquirrh and Cedar Mountains to the west and in the Wasatch Mountains to the east.
Date: 1977
Creator: Morris, H. T.; Douglass, Raymond C. & Kopf, Rudolph W.
Item Type: Report

Revisions of Ulmus and Zelkova in the Middle and Late Tertiary of Western North America

Description: Abstract: Examination of previously described and some undescribed leaves of Ulmus and Zelkova from the later Oligocene, Miocene, and Pliocene of western North America indicates that at least eight species of Ulmus and two species of Zelkova are represented. Three new species are described: Ulmus chaneyi, U. knowltoni, and Zelkova browni.
Date: 1977
Creator: Tanai, Toshimasa & Wolfe, Jack A.
Item Type: Report

Studies Related to the Charleston, South Carolina, Earthquake of 1886: a Preliminary Report

Description: From abstract: The seismic history of the southeastern United States is dominated by the 1886 earthquake near Charleston, S.C. An understanding of the specific source and the uniqueness of the neotectonic setting of this large earthquake is essential in order to properly assess seismic hazards in the southeastern United States. Such knowledge will also contribute to the fundamental understanding of intraplate earthquakes and will aid indirectly in deciphering the evolution of Atlantic-type continental margins. The 15 chapters in this volume report on the first stage of an ongoing multidisciplinary study of the Charleston earthquake of 1886.
Date: 1977
Creator: Rankin, Douglas W.
Item Type: Report

Paleozoic-Mesozoic Boundary in the Berry Creek Quadrangle, Northwestern Sierra Nevada, California

Description: Abstract: Structural and petrologic studies in the Berry Creek quadrangle at the north end of the western metamorphic belt of the Sierra Nevada have yielded new information that helps in distinguishing between the chemically similar Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks. The distinguishing features are structural and textural and result from different degrees of deformation. Most Paleozoic rocks are strongly deformed and thoroughly recrystallized. Phenocrysts in metavolcanic rocks are granulated and drawn out into lenses that have sutured outlines. In contrast, the phenocrysts in the Mesozoic metavolcanic rocks show well-preserved straight crystal faces, are only slightly or not at all granulated, and contain fewer mineral inclusions than do those in the Paleozoic rocks. The groundmass in the Paleozoic rocks is recrystallized to a fairly coarse grained albite-epidote-amphibole-chlorite rock, whereas in the Mesozoic rocks the groundmass is a very fine grained feltlike mesh with only spotty occurrence of well-recrystallized finegrained albite-epidote-chlorite-actinolite rock. Primary minerals, such as augite, are locally preserved in the Mesozoic rocks but are altered to a mixture of amphibole, chlorite, and epidote in the Paleozoic rocks. In the contact aureoles of the plutons, and within the Big Bend fault zone, which crosses the area parallel to the structural trends, all rocks are thoroughly recrystallized and strongly deformed. Identification of the Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks in these parts of the area was based on the continuity of the rock units in the field and on gradual changes in microscopic textures toward the plutons.
Date: 1977
Creator: Hietanen, Anna Martta
Item Type: Report

Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian Formations of the Funeral Mountains in the Ryan Quadrangle, Death Valley Region, California

Description: From abstract: A composite section of the Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian formations in the Funeral Mountains between Death Valley and Amargosa Valley is about 4,700 feet thick. The formations are in the top of a concordant, complexly faulted sequence that is about 25,000 feet thick from the highest part of the Precambrian to the Upper Mississippian. The Silurian and younger formations consist of marine dolomite and limestone that contain some regionally characteristic cherty and siliceous clastic beds as well as widely spaced fossiliferous zones.
Date: 1974
Creator: McAllister, James Franklin
Item Type: Report

M.I.T. Plane Strain Device

Description: From abstract: This report describes a plane strain device that has been developed at M.I.T. during the past four years. The apparatus and associated equipment and test procedures are described in detail.
Date: July 1970
Creator: Bovee, Richard B. & Ladd, Charles C.
Item Type: Report

Modifications to Filling and Emptying System of Lock No. 1, Mississippi River, Minneapolis, Minnesota =: Hydraulic Model Investigation

Description: From abstract: The existing locks at Locks and Dam No. 1 were constructed between 1929 and 1932. Problems have been experienced with accumulation of ice and debris at the intakes, air entrapment in the culverts of the filling and emptying system, excessive turbulence in the lock chamber during filling, and hazardous conditions downstream from the locks during emptying operations.
Date: December 1979
Creator: Ables, Jackson H.
Item Type: Report

Hard Rock Silo Prototype Test Site Selection Investigations

Description: Abstract: Geologic field reconnaissance and geophysical evaluation of eight areas in the western part of the United States were made to locate a site for conducting tests of a prototype hard rock silo (HRS).
Date: April 1970
Creator: Kolb, Charles R.; Farrell, Warren J. & Curro, Joseph R., Jr.
Item Type: Report

Puerto Rico Energy Center Study: Volume 1

Description: From introduction: The scope of work of the study was to compile and analyze information on the resources and requirements of the southwestern, southeastern, and north-central coastal regions of the Commonwealth, and assess industrial and agricultural activities which in conjunction with the power and desalting plants, might comprise the energy center complex. The study was also to identify the need for any experimental, pilot or demonstration projects which benefit the practical application of the Energy Center concept in Puerto Rico.
Date: July 1970
Creator: Burns and Roe
Item Type: Report

Puerto Rico Energy Center Study: Executive Summary

Description: From introduction: The scope of work of the study was to compile and analyze information on the resources and requirements of the southwestern, southeastern, and north-central coastal regions of the Commonwealth, and assess industrial and agricultural activities which in conjunction with the power and desalting plants, might comprise the energy center complex. The study was also to identify the need for any experimental, pilot or demonstration projects which benefit the practical application of the Energy Center concept in Puerto Rico.
Date: July 1970
Creator: Burns and Roe
Item Type: Report

Puerto Rico Energy Center Study: Site Selection Supplement

Description: From introduction: The PRWRA has contracted with the AEC to study the application of an Energy Center in Puerto Rico. The authority in turn has retained Burns and Roe, Inc. as a subcontractor and the Dow Chemical Company as a major sub-subcontractor to carry out this study.
Date: July 1970
Creator: Burns and Roe
Item Type: Report