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Primary Productivity of Minor Marsh Plants in Delaware, Georgia and Maine

Description: Abstract: "This report summarizes the importance of common species of salt marsh plants inhabiting wetlands of the eastern U.S. coast. An evaluation of the ecological significance of the plants is based on their rates of primary production, morality, and contribution of detritus to the estuarine dependent systems. The data are important in reaching decisions relative to the deposition of dredged material in these coastal wetland systems."
Date: November 1977
Creator: Reimold, Robert J. & Linthurst, Rick Alan

Chromite and Other Mineral Deposits in Serpentine Rocks of the Piedmont Upland, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Delaware

Description: From abstract: The Piedmont Upland in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Delaware is about 160 miles long and at the most 50 miles wide. Rocks that underlie the province are the Baltimore gneiss of Precambrian age and quartzite, gneiss, schist, marble, phyllite, and greenstone, which make up the Glenarm series of early Paleozoic(?) age. These are intruded by granitic, gabbroic, and ultramafic igneous rocks. Most of the ultramafic rocks, originally peridotite, pyroxenite, and dunite, have been partly or completely altered to serpentine and talc; they are all designated by the general term serpentine. The bodies of serpentine are commonly elongate and conformable with the enclosing rocks.
Date: 1960
Creator: Pearre, Nancy C. & Heyl, Allen V., Jr.

Physical Hydraulic Models: Assessment of Predictive Capabilities; Report 1: Hydrodynamics of the Delaware River Estuary Model

Description: Partial abstract: The purpose of this study is to define the reliability with which results of tests conducted in a physical model of the Delaware River Estuary can be used to predict the effects of modifications to the estuary. The Delaware River model at the Waterways Experiment Station was used to conduct tests to predict the effects of the navigation channel enlargement between Philadelphia and Trenton, and the results of the tests are compared with subsequent prototype data to determine the accuracy of the model predictions.
Date: June 1975
Creator: Letter, Joseph V., Jr. & McAnally, William H., Jr.

Chestnut Blight

Description: "Chestnut blight, caused by a fungus brought into this country from Asia before 1904, is responsible for the death of millions of acres of chestnut growth in New England and the Middle Atlantic States. The disease spread rapidly to nearly all parts of the range of the native chestnut, and the remaining stands of the southern Appalachians face certain destruction. The present known distribution, its symptoms, and the fungus that causes the disease are described. The blight fungus itself does not have any effect upon the strength of chestnut timber, and blight-killed trees can be utilized for poles, posts, cordwood, lumber, and extract wood. Search is being made for native and foreign chestnuts resistant to the disease in the hope of finding a tree suitable for replacing the rapidly disappearing stands. Seedlings of Asiatic chestnuts, which have considerable natural resistance even though not immune, are being tested in the United States." -- p. ii
Date: 1930
Creator: Gravatt, G. F. & Gill, L. S.

Wildlife Conservation Through Erosion Control in the Piedmont

Description: "Erosion has left scars on a majority of farms in the Southeast. Too poor to produce crops, the eroding spots are usually abandoned. Unless they are treated to stop further washing of the soil they grow steadily larger and continually rob the farmer of more of his land. Fortunately, soil conservation and wildlife management can be effectively combined, and otherwise worthless areas made to produce a crop of game, fur bearers, and other desirable types of wildlife. The general principles of wildlife management on the farm are described in Farmers' Bulletins 1719 and 1759. The purpose of this bulletin is to show how gullies, terrace outlets, waterways, eroding field borders, pastures, and woodlands in the Piedmont region may be protected against erosion through the use of vegetation that will also provide food and cover for wildlife." -- p. ii
Date: 1937
Creator: Stevens, Ross O.

Beekeeping in the Buckwheat Region

Description: "The production of the full honey crop from buckwheat requires a plan of apiary management quite different from that of most other beekeeping regions. A system of management is here given which will result in a full honey crop and at the same time control European foulbrood, which is so prevalent in the buckwheat region. Methods are also given which may be used in case the clovers are valuable as sources of nectar." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Phillips, Everett Franklin, 1878-1951 & Demuth, Geo. S. (George S.)

Beekeeping in the Tulip-Tree Region

Description: "Many thousand colonies of bees occur in the region where the tulip-tree is abundant but the honey crop from tulip-tree flowers inconsiderable. Too few beekeepers in this region have modern equipment, it is true, but the greatest loss comes from the fact that they do not care for their bees so as to have them ready to gather the abundant nectar from this early-blooming tree. In this bulletin a methods is given for the management of the apiary so that the full honey crop from this source may be obtained." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Phillips, Everett Franklin, 1878-1951 & Demuth, Geo. S. (George S.)

A Simple Way to Increase Crop Yields: Methods Followed by Farmers of the Coastal Plain Section of the Central Atlantic States in Building Up Soil Fertility

Description: "The soils of the coastal plain section of the Central Atlantic States, as a rule, are light in character, have been farmed for generations, and need first of all a liberal supply of organic matter. This need should be met by growing such legumes as crimson clover, cowpeas, soy beans, red clover, and hairy vetch. Rye, buckwheat, and the grasses are also valuable in this connection. Commercial fertilizer and lime should be used freely when necessary to stimulate the growth of these soil-improving crops. By arranging the cropping system to include one or more legumes that supply the land with nitrogen and humus, crop yields have been greatly increased on many farms scattered throughout this region. The systems followed on a few of the more successful of these farms are described in detail in the following pages." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Miller, H. A.

The Southern Corn Rootworm and Farm Practices to Control It

Description: "Of all corn pests in the South one of the most serious is the larva, or young, of the 12-spotted cucumber beetle -- the so-called southern corn rootworm. True to its name, it feeds on the roots, but in young corn it also drills a small hole in the stem just above the first circle of roots, boring out the crown and killing the bud.... Progressive farming methods, as described in this bulletin, will reduce the ravages of this insect. Burn over waste places to destroy dead grass, weeds, and rubbish in which the beetles winter. If possible, avoid planting corn in fields which contained corn the year before. Enrich the soil by planting legumes so that the corn will have a better chance of recovering from rootworm injury. Protect the bobwhite. This bird destroys many beetles of the rootworm. By careful observations, extending over a period of years, find out the dates between which the rooworm does the most damage; then time your planting so that it will fall either before or after these dates, taking into consideration, of course, other important factors in crop production." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Luginbill, Philip

Handling and Loading Southern New Potatoes

Description: This bulletin discusses methods for handling, loading, and transporting southern new potatoes in the United States. It explains the importance of grading potatoes, removing bruised and diseased potatoes from the crop before transport, and loading cars properly. Potatoes may be loaded into cars in barrels, sacks, and crates, but hampers should not be used.
Date: 1919
Creator: Grimes, A. M.

Handling and Loading Southern New Potatoes

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses methods for handling, loading, and transporting southern new potatoes in the United States. It explains the importance of grading potatoes, removing bruised and diseased potatoes from the crop before transport, and loading cars properly. Potatoes may be loaded into cars in barrels, sacks, and crates, but hampers should not be used.
Date: 1927
Creator: Grimes, A. M.

The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, feeding on the juices of the plant and causing a slight swelling or distortion of the stem above the joint. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks wheat only. The injury which it causes to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the effects caused by these two insects are often confused by farmers." -- p. 1-2. This bulletin gives a brief outline of the life cycle and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended.
Date: 1940
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972 & Poos, F. W.

The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, sucking the juices of the plant and causing a swelling in the stem. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks no other kind of plant. The injury which it does to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the depredations of these two insects are often confused by farmers. This paper is intended, therefore, to give a brief outline of the life history and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended." -- p. 3-4
Date: 1918
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972

The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer

Description: This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. This bulletin gives the life history of the insect, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it. There are two generations in a season, so greater vigilance is necessary. The second generation passes the winter only in the corn roots, so if these are destroyed or plowed under deeply, the pest will be largely decreased. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the pest." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Ainslie, George G.

The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer

Description: Revised edition. This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. There are two generations in a season. As the second generation passes the winter in the corn roots, if the roots are destroyed or plowed, the pest will be largely subdued. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the borer. This bulletin gives the life history of the borer, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it." -- p. ii
Date: 1933
Creator: Ainslie, George G.

The Roundheaded Apple-Tree Borer

Description: This report discusses the roundheaded apple-tree borer, an insect in the eastern and midwestern United States that, in its larval stage, destroys the bark and wood of apple trees. Several methods of control are discussed, including worming, paints and washes, and sprays.Apple-tree borers.
Date: 1915
Creator: Brooks, Fred E.