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Analyses of Coals in the United States with Descriptions of Mine and Field Samples Collected between July 1, 1904 and June 30, 1910 Part 2. Descriptions of Samples
From Introduction: "This volume contains the descriptions of the samples whose analyses are published in the preceding volume, Part I of this bulletin. The descriptions have been compiled from the notebooks of the persons who collected the samples, have been condensed from accounts given in published reports of the United States Geological Survey, or have furnished by the collection themselves. Inasmuch as the descriptions represent the work of many persons during a period of six years, and inasmuch as they were recorded under widely differing conditions, they necessarily vary in fullness detail."
Coal-Mine Accidents in the United States and Foreign Countries
From Introduction: "The lack of comparable and accurate statistics of coal-mine accidents in the united States as a whole led the Bureau of Mines in 1911 to undertake the collection of such data. The mining departments of the leading foreign coal-producing countries have long taken cognizance of the importance of statistics. The bureau feels that in presenting the tables embodied in this report it is offering the and comparable statistics of coal-min accidents for the country as a whole that have ever been published."
Oil and Gas Wells through Workable Coal Beds: Papers and Discussions
From Preface: "In carrying out such a policy with reference to the subject under consideration, the Bureau of Mines invited the State geologists, mine inspectors, and a number of coal operators and oil and gas well drillers from the States interested to meet representatives of the Bureau of Mines in Pittsburgh, Pa., for a discussion of the subject during February 7 and February 8, 1913. This adjourned meeting of the conference will be held at an early date and its report will be printed in a later edition of this bulletin, with such additional suggestions as may be received by the Bureau of Mines. The bureau will be glad, therefore, to receive at the earliest practicable date any additional suggestions or any additional information throwing light on the matters discussed in this bulletin."
Analyses of Coals in the United States with Descriptions of Mine and Field Samples Collected between July 1, 1904 and June 30, 1910: Part 1. -- Analyses
From Significance and value of Analyses of Coal: "The analyses published in this report cover samples of coal collected in many different parts of the country with unusual care by experiences men, in such manner as to make them representative of extensive beds of coal."
Analyses of Tipple and Delivered Samples of Coal: (Collected During the Fiscal Years 1948 to 1950 Inclusive)
From Forward: "This bulletin is the first of a new series, which includes analyses of only tipple and delivered coal. It covers samples collected throughout the United States from July 1, 1947 to June 30, 1950 (fiscal years 1948-50). It is planned that future publications of this series will cover a period of one fiscal year only and be issued as soon as possible after June 30 of each year."
The Decline and Ultimate Production of Oil Wells, with Notes on the Valuation of Oil Properties
From General Statement Purpose of the Report: "The present investigation was undertaken for the purpose of supplying some of the material so badly needed in the valuation and more efficient operation of oil properties. Because of the lack of time for further studies, the amount of data already accumulated and the policy of the Bureau of Mines of publishing as soon as possible any information that may be of use to an industry, the bulletin is issued now."
Mining and Milling of Lead and Zinc Ores in the Missouri-Kansas-Oklahoma Zinc District
From Introduction: "This report of investigations carried on by the Bureau of Mines gives the methods used in mining and milling and indicates in some detail the conditions that affect the efficiency of those methods; it does not attempt to discuss the geology of the district, except incidentally, as this has been described in numerous reports by several geologists."
Conditioning Water for Secondary-Recovery in Midcontinent Oil Fields
Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines on results from a study of water-injection plants in the mid-continent oil producing area. The report lists the field methods used, and the analysis of available water for injection. This report includes maps, illustrations, and photographs.
Zinc-Lead Ore Reserves of the Tri-State District, Missouri-Kansas-Oklahoma
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over studies of zinc-lead reserves in the tri-state area. The results of the studies are presented. This report includes tables, maps, and illustrations.
Production Potential of Copper Deposits Associated with Permian Red Bed Formations in Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines on the copper deposits in the Permian red beds from north-central Texas through Oklahoma, and into southwestern Kansas. Geologic and economic properties of the copper ore are documented. This report includes tables, maps, illustrations, and photographs.
Investigation of Melrose Zinc-Lead District, Ottawa County, Oklahoma, and Cherokee County, Kansas
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over studies conducted on the Melrose zinc-lead deposits. Methods used in the investigation are listed. The characteristics of the zinc-lead deposits are presented also. This report includes tables, maps, and illustrations.
Investigation of Zinc-Lead Deposits on Extensions of the Miami Trough, Ottawa County, Oklahoma, and Cherokee County, Kansas
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over studies conducted on zinc-lead fields of Oklahoma and Kansas. Properties of the physical features, geology, and drilling are presented. This report includes tables, maps, and illustrations.
The Soft Red Winter Wheats
"At least 66 distinct varieties of soft red winter wheat, known by nearly 400 different names, are grown commercially in the United States, and additional varieties are grown experimentally. These varieties differ widely in yield, adaptation, milling and baking value, and other characteristics. The most widely grown varieties in the United States in order of importance are Fultz, Fulcaster, Mediterranean, Poole, Red May, Red Wave, and Harvest Queen. The area of each of these varieties in 1919 varied from about 4,800,000 acres to about 1,000,000 acres." -- p. 2
The Roundheaded Apple-Tree Borer
This report discusses the roundheaded apple-tree borer, an insect in the eastern and midwestern United States that, in its larval stage, destroys the bark and wood of apple trees. Several methods of control are discussed, including worming, paints and washes, and sprays.Apple-tree borers.
Growing Hard Spring Wheat
"This bulletin discusses the topographic, soil, and climatic features of the northern Great Plains, with special reference to the production of hard spring wheat in that area. Cultural methods for growing the crop are given." -- title
The Culture of Winter Wheat in the Eastern United States
Report discussing best practices for growing winter wheat in the eastern United States. Topics discussed include soils adapted to wheat cultivation, fertilizers, seed selection and preparation, and crop rotation.
The Culture of Winter Wheat in the Eastern United States
Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for growing winter wheat in the eastern United States. Topics discussed include soils adapted to wheat cultivation, fertilizers, seed selection and preparation, and crop rotation.
Sixty-Day and Kherson Oats
Report discussing the results of experiments undertaken to determine the viability of early oats in different regions of the United States since early oats typically thrive only in the Corn Belt and Great Plains regions.
Better Grain-Sorghum Crops
"This paper presents the best-known methods of improving the grain-sorghum crops on the farms where they are grown. These methods are simple and inexpensive of time or money, and are therefore within the reach of all farmers. More attention to the bettering of the quality and yields will be repaid as fully in these crops as in other cereals." -- p. 2. Sorghum crops can be improved for drought resistance, earliness, stature, productivity, and adaptability to machine techniques.
Forage Crops for Hogs in Kansas and Oklahoma
Report discussing forage crops commonly grown for hog feed in Kansas and Oklahoma. Among the more important crops are alfalfa, wheat, oats, and rye, while less important forage crops include clovers, rape, sorghum, cowpeas, Canadian field peas, soy beans, grasses, root crops, and pumpkins. There is also a brief discussion of systems of hog feeding and pasturing, particularly in Oklahoma.
Shallu, or "Egyptian Wheat": A Late-Maturing Variety of Sorghum
"Many varieties of sorghum have been introduced into the United States in the past 30 or 40 years. Some of these have proved valuable under dry-land conditions in the southern Great Plains.... Shallu is one of the introductions which are not adapted to dry-land conditions. It is a variety that requires a long favorable season to mature.... This bulletin is intended for farmers who are interested in the growing of grain-sorghum crops. It applies to the southern Great Plains under dry-land conditions. It records the results obtained from shallu when grown under such conditions in comparison with other varieties of grain sorghum in varietal tests in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and New Mexico." -- p. 4
How to Use Sorghum Grain
This bulletin discusses the uses of sorghum grain, including in animal feeds, human food, and alcohol production.
Advice to Forest Planters in the Plains Regions
"Advice about tree planting to provide a windbreak and a supply of firewood, fence posts, and wood for repairs should be especially valuable to the settler in the Plains region. This bulletin gives advice that will enable him to select the species of trees that will bring the most profitable returns without overburdening him with care. Following the description of each species of tree adapted to the region, the points to be avoided in connection with its planting are summarized in a few concise 'dont's.' Information and advice also are given regarding time for planting, methods of cultivation, pruning, etc." -- p. 2
Growing Winter Wheat on the Great Plains
"This bulletin is intended to answer the requests for information on the production of winter wheat on the Great Plains under dry-farming conditions that arise from the stimulus of a present and prospective price much higher than that under which the agriculture of the section has been developed and from the campaign for a large increase in the crop to meet the necessities of war conditions." -- p. 3. Topics discussed include wheat varieties and seeding.
Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture
This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture
Revised edition. This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
The False Chinch Bug and Measures for Controlling It
This report discusses the false chinch bug, which is common to the plateau region east of the Rocky Mountains in the United States (especially in Kansas and Colorado), and methods for controlling it.
Pit Silos
"Pit silos are becoming common in many sections of the Great Plains region, especially in the Panhandle of Texas and in similar sections of the United States. The popularity of this type of silo is due chiefly to the remoteness of many farms in these sections from railroad points, which in many cases would make the cost of a masonry silo prohibitive, and to the fact that silos of wood often weaken rapidly under the peculiar climatic conditions prevailing in the Plains region and are destroyed by wind." -- p. 3. The report discusses factors to consider when deciding to build a pit silo and outlines plans for successfully constructing one.
Uses of Sorghum Grain
This report discusses the uses of sorghum grain for human food and animal feed, including information about nutrition, digestibility, and storage and preparation. Sorghum is grown primarily in the southern Great Plains of the United States.
Grasshoppers and Their Control on Sugar Beets and Truck Crops
This report discusses grasshoppers, which destroy sugar beets and truck crops, and methods for controlling grasshoppers in the light of recent outbreaks in the mid-western United States, particularly in Kansas. The reproductive practices of grasshoppers and their preferred climatic conditions are given special attention.
Grain Farming in the Corn Belt with Live Stock as a Side Line
"This bulletin is written to suggest to the corn-belt farmer of the Middle West -- especially the farmer whose soil has been run down by continuous grain farming -- some ways of coordinating and 'cashing in' the scientific advice offered him in hundreds of bulletins already published.... Briefly, these are the conclusions reached by our most successful corn-belt farmer and agricultural experts: To make a money-maker of a farm that has become a losing proposition through steady grain farming you must in addition to raising standard grain crops -- (1) Grow legumes, (2) Raise live stock as a side line, (3) Keep accounts of receipts and expenditures, (4) Mix horse sense with scientific agriculture, (5) Try to secure enough capital to enable you to farm right, (6) Stick to whatever policy you adopt long enough to try it out, and (7) Confer with your County Agent and make a careful study of the bulletins of the United States Department of Agriculture." -- p. 1-3.
Growing Fruit for Home Use in the Great Plains Area
This report gives recommendations to farmers in the Great Plains of the United States who would like to grow fruit in this region in which fruit is not commonly cultivated. Topics discussed include climate and soil requirements, pruning, irrigation, orchard pests, injury from hail, and suggested fruit varieties.
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
"This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Because strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove helpful to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "Strawberries can be grown in those parts of the western Untied States in which ordinary farm crops are irrigated as well as in western Oregon and Washington, where irrigation is not essential but may be profitable. The principles of irrigating strawberries are essentially the same as those for other crops. Because strawberries are sensitive to the alkali salts that irrigation brings to the surface, such salts must be washed out or skimmed off. The strawberry grower, after choosing a suitable site and preparing the soil carefully, should select varieties adapted to his district and needs. He should use plants that are disease-free. In California, southern Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas the plants should have undergone a rest period. Usually the growers plant during the period of greatest rainfall. By using the recommended systems of training and care before, during, and after setting of the plants and the suggested methods of decreasing diseases and insect pests, he should obtain better yields. A grower can furnish consumers a better product by using good methods of harvesting and shipment. He can prolong the fresh-fruit season only a little by the use of cold storage, but he can extend his market by growing varieties suitable for preserving, canning, and freezing." -- p. ii
Preventing Soil Blowing on the Southern Great Plains
"Soil blowing is often a serious problem from December to May [in the Southern Great Plains], when the soil is, in many cases, bare and winds are high. This period is often referred to as the 'blow season.' The whole art of preventing and controlling soil blowing consists in keeping nonblowing materials on the surface. These may be crops, crop residues, or clods. When crops are absent, the essential feature in preventing soil blowing is the use of implements that lift clods and other nonblowing materials to the surface rather than implements that pulverize or destroy them.... Since tillage is dependent on implements, it seems of first importance to consider the implements that may be used to discuss their merits and shortcomings in relation to soil blowing.... From the general principles stated and the specific examples of implement use given, most farmers can probably decide on the correct applications for their farms." -- p. 1-3
Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States
"The information given in this bulletin should enable farmers in the Great Plains and Western States to select from the more common species of grasses some one or more suited to their needs [for soil and water conservation]. Common harvesting equipment and farm machinery can be adapted to the proper handling of native grasses. This brings the cost of such work within the means of most farmers." -- p. i. Among the grasses discussed are wheatgrass, buffalo grass, bluestem, grama, Bermuda grass, wild rye, hilaria, Sudan grass, bluegrass, panic grasses, dropseed, and needlegrass.
The Hard Red Winter Wheats
This bulletin discusses the classes and varieties of hard red winter wheats and the areas in which they are successfully grown. Among the varieties discussed are Turkey, Kharkof, Kanred, Blackhull, Minturki, and Baeska.
Sand-Dune Reclamation in the Southern Great Plains
"Among the most striking manifestations of the destruction of soils and crops by the windstorms of recent years are the gigantic sand dunes that have formed on some of the lighter soils of the Great Plains. Specialists of the Soil Conservation Service who were assigned to a study of the problem have been successful in devising methods by which these immense piles of sand, which have covered cultivated lands and good native sod, can be leveled and stabilized. Of still greater value to the farmers and ranchers in areas subject to this soil shifting are the methods of cultivation and land use that recent study and experiments have revealed as the best means of protection against the formation of dunes. This bulletin is written for the benefit of those farmers and ranchers who are faced with the problem of protecting their lands against possible damage from dune formation of with the more immediate problem of restoring lands that have been made temporarily useless by the invasion of these monstrous wind-blown piles of sand." -- p. i
Crops Against the Wind on the Southern Great Plains
"This bulletin briefly traces the circumstances which have created the soil problems in the southern Great Plains and shows how the hand of man has hastened present troubles. But it goes further and deals with the methods now being used to solve the problem on nature's own terms." -- p. 2-3. Some of the solutions discussed include contour farming, terraces, water conservation techniques, crop lines, and revegetation.
Waste of Oil and Gas in the Mid-Continent Fields
Technical paper issued by the Bureau of Mines over studies of waste in oil and gas fields in the mid-continent area. As stated in the introduction, this report "describes the general amounts and kinds of waste, and attempts to show the importance of conserving these natural resources" (p. 5). This paper includes tables, maps, illustrations, and photographs.
Experiments in the Use of Back Pressures on Oil Wells
Technical paper issued by the Bureau of Mines over experiments conducted on the back pressure of oil wells. The results of the experiments are presented and discussed. This paper includes tables, photographs, and illustrations.
Annual Report of Research and Technologic Work on Coal: Fiscal Year 1941
Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing the annual report over the research and technology of coal during 1941. As stated in the foreword, "these investigations increase our fund of exact knowledge on the properties and composition of American coals and lead to better methods in mining, preparing, storing, and utilizing coal" (p. 4). This report includes tables, illustrations, photographs, and a map.
Silicosis and Tuberculosis Among Miners of the Tri-State District of Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri--[Part] 1: For the Year Ended June 30, 1928
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines discussing the occurrence of tuberculosis and silicosis among mine workers of the Tri-State district including Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri. Past history of the diseases are presented, as well as the standard means of examination of miners. This report includes a map, tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Catalog of Recorded Exploration Drilling and Mine Workings, Tri-State Zinc-Lead District--Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma
Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing mining practices conducted in the tri-state district of Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. As stated in the introduction, "the catalog preserves the records of accomplished explorations and mine developments in the district and provides a readily available source of information for individuals and firms interested in planning mineral explorations, Government agencies estimating of reserves of mineral resources, and the mining industry for general use" (p. 1). This report includes tables, maps, and illustrations
The Anadarko Basin (of parts of Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, and Colorado)
Abstract: This report is a synthesis of published and unpublished data on the rocks of the Anadarko basin.
Complete Bouguer and Isostatic Residual Gravity Maps of the Anadarko Basin, Wichita Mountains, and Surrounding Areas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas, and Colorado
From abstract: This report contains the complete Bouger and isostatic residual gravity maps of the Anadarko basin, Wichita Mountains, and surrounding areas on parts of Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas and Colorado that were compiled using gravity data from 11,023 stations.
Geology and Ore Deposits of the Picher Field, Oklahoma and Kansas
From Purpose and Scope of Report: This report presents a detailed description of the ore deposits of the Picher field and all phases of geology having a bearing on their localization, origin, and the search for them. It is based mainly on work done by the U.S. Geological Survey, but it also incorporates pertinent data from published literature, especially from the outstanding work of George M. Fowler and associates, and some unpublished data obtained from the geologic staffs of the mining companies.