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Investigation of Zinc-Lead Deposits on Extensions of the Miami Trough, Ottawa County, Oklahoma, and Cherokee County, Kansas
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over studies conducted on zinc-lead fields of Oklahoma and Kansas. Properties of the physical features, geology, and drilling are presented. This report includes tables, maps, and illustrations.
Recent Developments in Water Flooding in Nowata County, Oklahoma: Oil Fields, 1954-55
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over development of systematic flooding in oil field reservoirs. As stated in the introduction, "this report presents a discussion of four full-scale water-flooding projects in the Delaware-Childers field and 1 pilot project in the Curl Creek field" (p. 1). This report includes tables, graphs, maps, and illustrations.
Petroleum-Engineering Study of Muskogee Oilfield, Muskogee County, Oklahoma
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over petroleum-engineering studies conducted on the Muskogee oilfield. As stated in the introduction, "this report describes the geology and reviews the oil-production history of the Dutcher sands of Pennsylvania age in the Muskogee oilfield" (p. 1). This report includes tables, maps, and illustrations.
Effects of Hydraulic Fracturing in Oklahoma Waterflood Wells
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over studies conducted on water flood wells and hydraulic fracturing. As stated in the introduction, "this report presents results of that study and an analysis of some of the factors governing the results of fracture treatment on water flood properties" (p. 1). This report includes tables, and illustrations.
The Soft Red Winter Wheats
"At least 66 distinct varieties of soft red winter wheat, known by nearly 400 different names, are grown commercially in the United States, and additional varieties are grown experimentally. These varieties differ widely in yield, adaptation, milling and baking value, and other characteristics. The most widely grown varieties in the United States in order of importance are Fultz, Fulcaster, Mediterranean, Poole, Red May, Red Wave, and Harvest Queen. The area of each of these varieties in 1919 varied from about 4,800,000 acres to about 1,000,000 acres." -- p. 2
Demonstration Work in Cooperation with Southern Farmers
Report discussing the efforts of the Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work, which consists of "(1) the demonstration of improved methods of agriculture in the weevil-infected districts [...] and (2) the extension of the same principles to other Southern States beyond the range of weevil infestation." (p. 6) Congress created the organization in 1904 to assist with relief efforts.
The Roundheaded Apple-Tree Borer
This report discusses the roundheaded apple-tree borer, an insect in the eastern and midwestern United States that, in its larval stage, destroys the bark and wood of apple trees. Several methods of control are discussed, including worming, paints and washes, and sprays.Apple-tree borers.
Growing Hard Spring Wheat
"This bulletin discusses the topographic, soil, and climatic features of the northern Great Plains, with special reference to the production of hard spring wheat in that area. Cultural methods for growing the crop are given." -- title
The Cotton Bollworm: Some Observations and Results of Field Experiments in 1904
Report discussing the cotton bollworm, which is very destructive to the cotton plant, especially in the Southwestern states in the Cotton Belt of the United States. Contains reports on fieldwork conducted at two stations in Texas and a discussion of effective and ineffective methods of control.
The Culture of Winter Wheat in the Eastern United States
Report discussing best practices for growing winter wheat in the eastern United States. Topics discussed include soils adapted to wheat cultivation, fertilizers, seed selection and preparation, and crop rotation.
The Culture of Winter Wheat in the Eastern United States
Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for growing winter wheat in the eastern United States. Topics discussed include soils adapted to wheat cultivation, fertilizers, seed selection and preparation, and crop rotation.
Sixty-Day and Kherson Oats
Report discussing the results of experiments undertaken to determine the viability of early oats in different regions of the United States since early oats typically thrive only in the Corn Belt and Great Plains regions.
Texas or Tick Fever and Its Prevention
Report discussing the disease tick fever (also known as Texas fever) and its destructive effects on cattle. Topics discussed include the life cycle of the tick which transmits the disease, symptoms of the disease, and methods of treatment and prevention.
Demonstration Work on Southern Farms
Report discussing the origination and purpose of the Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work. The agency is primarily tasked with developing methods to control the spread of the Mexican cotton boll weevil, but it researches cultivation techniques for other crops as well, particularly corn and cowpea. This report summarizes the agency's preliminary findings.
Better Grain-Sorghum Crops
"This paper presents the best-known methods of improving the grain-sorghum crops on the farms where they are grown. These methods are simple and inexpensive of time or money, and are therefore within the reach of all farmers. More attention to the bettering of the quality and yields will be repaid as fully in these crops as in other cereals." -- p. 2. Sorghum crops can be improved for drought resistance, earliness, stature, productivity, and adaptability to machine techniques.
Forage Crops for Hogs in Kansas and Oklahoma
Report discussing forage crops commonly grown for hog feed in Kansas and Oklahoma. Among the more important crops are alfalfa, wheat, oats, and rye, while less important forage crops include clovers, rape, sorghum, cowpeas, Canadian field peas, soy beans, grasses, root crops, and pumpkins. There is also a brief discussion of systems of hog feeding and pasturing, particularly in Oklahoma.
Shallu, or "Egyptian Wheat": A Late-Maturing Variety of Sorghum
"Many varieties of sorghum have been introduced into the United States in the past 30 or 40 years. Some of these have proved valuable under dry-land conditions in the southern Great Plains.... Shallu is one of the introductions which are not adapted to dry-land conditions. It is a variety that requires a long favorable season to mature.... This bulletin is intended for farmers who are interested in the growing of grain-sorghum crops. It applies to the southern Great Plains under dry-land conditions. It records the results obtained from shallu when grown under such conditions in comparison with other varieties of grain sorghum in varietal tests in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and New Mexico." -- p. 4
Screw-Worms and Other Maggots Affecting Animals
This bulletin discusses the screwworm, which is a maggot that causes losses to livestock, and measures for its control. Other maggots and insects discussed include the sheep-wool maggot, the black blowfly, the green bottle fly, and the gray flesh fly.
Eradication of Bermuda Grass
This bulletin describes Bermuda grass, a plant that is both highly valuable to pastures and also invasive in the southern United States, and gives suggestions for its control. Possible methods for eradication include the strategic use of shade, winterkilling, fallowing, hog grazing, and tilling practices.
How to Use Sorghum Grain
This bulletin discusses the uses of sorghum grain, including in animal feeds, human food, and alcohol production.
Crop Systems for Arkansas
"Crop systems for Arkansas that make for increased food production and increased efficiency in man labor and horse labor are described in the following pages. By the introduction of cowpeas, soybeans, and other legumes, and by second cropping, provision is made for a considerable increase in the number of crop acres that can be farmed by the average family.... In each of the cropping systems suggested the crop acreages are calculated for two men and a team, and for light, medium, and heavy soils. These systems in general apply to all of Arkansas, except the northwestern part, and some of them may be used to advantage in northern Louisiana, northeastern Texas, southeastern Oklahoma, western Tennessee, and the northern half of Mississippi." -- p. 2
The Bollworm or Corn Earworm
"Cotton bollworm, corn earworm, tomato fruitworm, and false budworm of tobacco are common names applied to one and the same insect when it is found attacking these various crops. In fact the insect is a very general feeder, attacking many wild plants as well as garden vegetables, alfalfa, cowpeas, and the crops indicated above. The bollworm, or corn earworm as it is most widely known, occurs as a pest in practically all parts of the United States." -- p. 3. This bulletin discusses the life cycle of the insect, its distribution, and measures for its control.
Advice to Forest Planters in the Plains Regions
"Advice about tree planting to provide a windbreak and a supply of firewood, fence posts, and wood for repairs should be especially valuable to the settler in the Plains region. This bulletin gives advice that will enable him to select the species of trees that will bring the most profitable returns without overburdening him with care. Following the description of each species of tree adapted to the region, the points to be avoided in connection with its planting are summarized in a few concise 'dont's.' Information and advice also are given regarding time for planting, methods of cultivation, pruning, etc." -- p. 2
Growing Winter Wheat on the Great Plains
"This bulletin is intended to answer the requests for information on the production of winter wheat on the Great Plains under dry-farming conditions that arise from the stimulus of a present and prospective price much higher than that under which the agriculture of the section has been developed and from the campaign for a large increase in the crop to meet the necessities of war conditions." -- p. 3. Topics discussed include wheat varieties and seeding.
Handling and Loading Southern New Potatoes
This bulletin discusses methods for handling, loading, and transporting southern new potatoes in the United States. It explains the importance of grading potatoes, removing bruised and diseased potatoes from the crop before transport, and loading cars properly. Potatoes may be loaded into cars in barrels, sacks, and crates, but hampers should not be used.
Handling and Loading Southern New Potatoes
Revised edition. This bulletin discusses methods for handling, loading, and transporting southern new potatoes in the United States. It explains the importance of grading potatoes, removing bruised and diseased potatoes from the crop before transport, and loading cars properly. Potatoes may be loaded into cars in barrels, sacks, and crates, but hampers should not be used.
Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture
This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture
Revised edition. This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
The False Chinch Bug and Measures for Controlling It
This report discusses the false chinch bug, which is common to the plateau region east of the Rocky Mountains in the United States (especially in Kansas and Colorado), and methods for controlling it.
Pit Silos
"Pit silos are becoming common in many sections of the Great Plains region, especially in the Panhandle of Texas and in similar sections of the United States. The popularity of this type of silo is due chiefly to the remoteness of many farms in these sections from railroad points, which in many cases would make the cost of a masonry silo prohibitive, and to the fact that silos of wood often weaken rapidly under the peculiar climatic conditions prevailing in the Plains region and are destroyed by wind." -- p. 3. The report discusses factors to consider when deciding to build a pit silo and outlines plans for successfully constructing one.
Uses of Sorghum Grain
This report discusses the uses of sorghum grain for human food and animal feed, including information about nutrition, digestibility, and storage and preparation. Sorghum is grown primarily in the southern Great Plains of the United States.
Grasshoppers and Their Control on Sugar Beets and Truck Crops
This report discusses grasshoppers, which destroy sugar beets and truck crops, and methods for controlling grasshoppers in the light of recent outbreaks in the mid-western United States, particularly in Kansas. The reproductive practices of grasshoppers and their preferred climatic conditions are given special attention.
Bur Clover
This report discusses the cultivation of bur clover, which is an annual legume that serves as a winter cover crop and as pasturage. The best practices for and uses of bur clover are discussed in detail.
Grain Farming in the Corn Belt with Live Stock as a Side Line
"This bulletin is written to suggest to the corn-belt farmer of the Middle West -- especially the farmer whose soil has been run down by continuous grain farming -- some ways of coordinating and 'cashing in' the scientific advice offered him in hundreds of bulletins already published.... Briefly, these are the conclusions reached by our most successful corn-belt farmer and agricultural experts: To make a money-maker of a farm that has become a losing proposition through steady grain farming you must in addition to raising standard grain crops -- (1) Grow legumes, (2) Raise live stock as a side line, (3) Keep accounts of receipts and expenditures, (4) Mix horse sense with scientific agriculture, (5) Try to secure enough capital to enable you to farm right, (6) Stick to whatever policy you adopt long enough to try it out, and (7) Confer with your County Agent and make a careful study of the bulletins of the United States Department of Agriculture." -- p. 1-3.
Growing Fruit for Home Use in the Great Plains Area
This report gives recommendations to farmers in the Great Plains of the United States who would like to grow fruit in this region in which fruit is not commonly cultivated. Topics discussed include climate and soil requirements, pruning, irrigation, orchard pests, injury from hail, and suggested fruit varieties.
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
"This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Because strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove helpful to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "Strawberries can be grown in those parts of the western Untied States in which ordinary farm crops are irrigated as well as in western Oregon and Washington, where irrigation is not essential but may be profitable. The principles of irrigating strawberries are essentially the same as those for other crops. Because strawberries are sensitive to the alkali salts that irrigation brings to the surface, such salts must be washed out or skimmed off. The strawberry grower, after choosing a suitable site and preparing the soil carefully, should select varieties adapted to his district and needs. He should use plants that are disease-free. In California, southern Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas the plants should have undergone a rest period. Usually the growers plant during the period of greatest rainfall. By using the recommended systems of training and care before, during, and after setting of the plants and the suggested methods of decreasing diseases and insect pests, he should obtain better yields. A grower can furnish consumers a better product by using good methods of harvesting and shipment. He can prolong the fresh-fruit season only a little by the use of cold storage, but he can extend his market by growing varieties suitable for preserving, canning, and freezing." -- p. ii
Preventing Soil Blowing on the Southern Great Plains
"Soil blowing is often a serious problem from December to May [in the Southern Great Plains], when the soil is, in many cases, bare and winds are high. This period is often referred to as the 'blow season.' The whole art of preventing and controlling soil blowing consists in keeping nonblowing materials on the surface. These may be crops, crop residues, or clods. When crops are absent, the essential feature in preventing soil blowing is the use of implements that lift clods and other nonblowing materials to the surface rather than implements that pulverize or destroy them.... Since tillage is dependent on implements, it seems of first importance to consider the implements that may be used to discuss their merits and shortcomings in relation to soil blowing.... From the general principles stated and the specific examples of implement use given, most farmers can probably decide on the correct applications for their farms." -- p. 1-3
Soil Defense in the South
"This bulletin describes farming practices that conserve soil, and how such practices may be applied to farms in a large part of the South. Its scope is limited to that part of the Cotton Belt extending west from the Georgia-Alabama line to central Texas and southern Oklahoma." -- p. i.
Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States
"The information given in this bulletin should enable farmers in the Great Plains and Western States to select from the more common species of grasses some one or more suited to their needs [for soil and water conservation]. Common harvesting equipment and farm machinery can be adapted to the proper handling of native grasses. This brings the cost of such work within the means of most farmers." -- p. i. Among the grasses discussed are wheatgrass, buffalo grass, bluestem, grama, Bermuda grass, wild rye, hilaria, Sudan grass, bluegrass, panic grasses, dropseed, and needlegrass.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed and instructions for constructing a concrete vat are given.
The Hard Red Winter Wheats
This bulletin discusses the classes and varieties of hard red winter wheats and the areas in which they are successfully grown. Among the varieties discussed are Turkey, Kharkof, Kanred, Blackhull, Minturki, and Baeska.