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The Eastern Front of the Bitterroot Range, Montana

Description: From abstract: The origin of the gneissic rocks on the eastern border of the Idaho batholith in the Bitterroot Range, near Hamilton, Mont., has long been in dispute. Lindgren regarded these rocks as the product of stresses related to a normal fault along the front of the range with an eastward dip of about 150. He thought both the hanging wall and the footwall had moved, with a total displacement along the fault plane of at least 20,000 feet. The faulting was believed to have been so recent as to be a major factor in the present topography. Langton appears to accept the concept of faulting but to regard the gneissic rocks as formed much earlier from a granitic rock that was more silicic and older than the Idaho batholith.
Date: 1952
Creator: Ross, Clyde P.