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0-2 kv Flash Tube Supplies
The power supplies designed and constructed to power high-intensity flash tubes are described. Three supplies, capable of charging 100 mfd to 2 kv with a repetltion rate of not less than 0.8 sec, are operated remotely from a control panel containing 3 powerstats. The power supplies are full wave center trapped rectifiers employing silicon rectifiers. (M.C.G.)
0. 4 mm interferometer system using dielectric waveguide
A 0.4 mm submillimeter-wave, phase-modulated polarimeter/interferometer is used for simultaneous time-dependent measurement of line-averaged electron density and poloidal field-induced Faraday rotation along chords of the plasma column in ISX-B tokamak. Heterodyna detection and hollow dielectric waveguide are utilized to achieve the high sensitivity required for the multichord equipment.
0.5 μm E/D AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure field effect transistor technology with DFET threshold adjust implant
A doped-channel heterostructure field effect transistor (H-FET) technology has been developed with self-aligned refractory gate processing and using both enhancement- and depletion-mode transistors. D-HFET devices are obtained with a threshold voltage adjust implant into material designed for E-HFET operation. Both E- and D-HFETs utilize W/WSi bilayer gates, sidewall spacers, and rapid thermal annealing for controlling short channel effects. The 0.5 {mu}m E- HFETs (D-HFETs) have been demonstrated with transconductance of 425 mS/mm (265-310 mS/mm) and f{sub t} of 45-50 GHz. Ring oscillator gate delays of 19 ps with a power of 0.6 mW have been demonstrated using direct coupled FET logic. These results are comparable to previous doped-channel HFET devices and circuits fabricated by selective reactive ion etching rather than ion implantation for threshold voltage adjustment.
0.7-eV GaInAs Junction for a GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs(1-eV)/GaInAs(0.7-eV) Four-Junction Solar Cell: Preprint
We discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction solar cells, focusing on adding a fourth junction to the Ga0.5In0.5P/GaAs/Ga0.75In0.25As inverted three-junction cell. This cell, grown inverted on GaAs so that the lattice-mismatched Ga0.75In0.25As third junction is the last one grown, has demonstrated 38% efficiency, and 40% is likely in the near future. To achieve still further gains, a lower-bandgap GaxIn1-xAs fourth junction could be added to the three-junction structure for a four-junction cell whose efficiency could exceed 45% under concentration. Here, we present the initial development of the GaxIn1-xAs fourth junction. Junctions of various bandgaps ranging from 0.88 to 0.73 eV were grown, in order to study the effect of the different amounts of lattice mismatch. At a bandgap of 0.88 eV, junctions were obtained with very encouraging {approx}80% quantum efficiency, 57% fill factor, and 0.36 eV open-circuit voltage. The device performance degrades with decreasing bandgap (i.e., increasing lattice mismatch). We model the four-junction device efficiency vs. fourth junction bandgap to show that an 0.7-eV fourth-junction bandgap, while optimal if it could be achieved in practice, is not necessary; an 0.9-eV bandgap would still permit significant gains in multijunction cell efficiency while being easier to achieve than the lower-bandgap junction.
0. 9 a Gev /sup 238/U on /sup 238/U collisions in the LBL streamer chamber. Appendix A
Charged particle exclusive data for high multiplicity U on U events are reported. Analyses are based on comparison with Cugnon's intranuclear cascade model, and the explosion-evaporation simulation of Fai and Randrup. The azimuthal structure of the observed events shows evidence of collective flow. The widely used flow angle methodology proves to be relatively insensitive to collective effects under the conditions of the present experiment. An isotropic pattern of ejectile emission is not reached at maximum multiplicity. 18 refs., 4 figs.
0. 20-m (8-in. ) primary burner development report
High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) utilize graphite-base fuels. Fluidized-bed burners are being employed successfully in the experimental reprocessing of these fuels. The primary fluidized-bed burner is a unit operation in the reprocessing flowsheet in which the graphite moderator is removed. A detailed description of the development status of the 0.20-m (8-in.) diameter primary fluidized-bed burner as of July 1, 1977 is presented. Experimental work to date performed in 0.10; 0.20; and 0.40-m (4, 8, and 16 in.) diameter primary burners has demonstrated the feasibility of the primary burning process and, at the same time, has defined more clearly the areas in which additional experimental work is required. The design and recent operating history of the 0.20-m-diameter burner are discussed, with emphasis placed upon the evolution of the current design and operating philosophy.
The 0.22 Percent Across-the-Board Cut in FY2001 Appropriations
Report describing changes that affected the government budget for the 2001 fiscal year under the Consolidated Appropriations Act.
The 0.38 Percent Across-the-Board Cut in FY2000 Appropriations
This report outlines cuts made in the federal budget for FY2000. The 0.38% cut was expected to yield savings of $2.4 billion in budget authority and $1.4 billion in outlays for the fiscal year. Departments with cuts in excess of $100 million included the Departments of Defense, Transportation, Health and Human Services, and Education.
0.351 micron Laser Beam propagation in High-temperature Plasmas
A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes have been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. The plasma emulator is produced in a gas-filled hohlraum; a blue 351-nm laser beam propagates along the axis of the hohlraum interacting with a high-temperature (T{sub e} = 3.5 keV), dense (n{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 20}cm{sup -3}), long-scale length (L {approx} 2 mm) plasma. Experiments at these conditions have demonstrated that the interaction beam produces less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for laser intensities less than I < 2 x 10{sup 15} W-cm{sup -2}. The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2 keV to 3.5 keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. A plasma length scaling is also investigated extending our measurements to 4-mm long high-temperature plasmas. At intensities I < 5 x 10{sup 14} W-cm{sup -2}, greater than 80% of the energy in the laser is transmitted through a 5-mm long, high-temperature (T{sub e} > 2.5 keV) high-density (n{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 20} w-cm{sup -3}) plasma. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows a stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold (R=10%) for a linear gain of 15; these high temperature, low density experiments produce plasma conditions comparable to those along the outer beams in ignition hohlraum designs. By increasing the gas fill density (n{sub e} = 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}) in these ...
0.25mm-Thick CCD Packaging for the Dark Energy Survey Camera Array
Abstract: The Dark Energy Survey Camera focal plane array will consist of 62 2k x 4k CCDs with a pixel size of 15 microns and a silicon thickness of 250 microns for use at wavelengths between 400 and 1000 nm. Bare CCD die will be received from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). At the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the bare die will be packaged into a custom back-side-illuminated module design. Cold probe data from LBNL will be used to select the CCDs to be packaged. The module design utilizes an aluminum nitride readout board and spacer and an Invar foot. A module flatness of 3 microns over small (1 sqcm) areas and less than 10 microns over neighboring areas on a CCD are required for uniform images over the focal plane. A confocal chromatic inspection system is being developed to precisely measure flatness over a grid up to 300 x 300 mm. This system will be utilized to inspect not only room-temperature modules, but also cold individual modules and partial arrays through flat dewar windows.
0.52eV Quaternary InGaAsSb Thermophotovoltaic Diode Technology
Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) diodes fabricated from 0.52eV lattice-matched InGaAsSb alloys are grown by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) on GaSb substrates. 4cm{sup 2} multi-chip diode modules with front-surface spectral filters were tested in a vacuum cavity and attained measured efficiency and power density of 19% and 0.58 W/cm{sup 2} respectively at operating at temperatures of T{sub radiator} = 950 C and T{sub diode} = 27 C. Device modeling and minority carrier lifetime measurements of double heterostructure lifetime specimens indicate that diode conversion efficiency is limited predominantly by interface recombination and photon energy loss to the GaSb substrate and back ohmic contact. Recent improvements to the diode include lattice-matched p-type AlGaAsSb passivating layers with interface recombination velocities less than 100 cm/s and new processing techniques enabling thinned substrates and back surface reflectors. Modeling predictions of these improvements to the diode architecture indicate that conversion efficiencies from 27-30% and {approx}0.85 W/cm{sup 2} could be attained under the above operating temperatures.
No Description Available.
$D^0 \bar{D}^0$ Mixing at BaBar
This article reviews the recent measurement of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with the D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi} decay channel from the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II B-Factory. Averages from the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group between this result and a previous result from BELLE are also presented.
0-D study of the compression of low temperature spheromaks
Compression of low temperature spheromak plasmas has been studied with the aid of a O-D two-fluid computer code. It is found that in a plasma which is radiation dominated, the electron temperature can be increased by up to a factor of seven for a compression of a factor of two, provided the temperature is above some critical value (approx.25eV) and the electron density particle confinement time product n/sub e/tau/sub p/ greater than or equal to 1 x 10/sup 9/s/cm/sup 3/. If the energy balance is dominated by particle confinement losses rather than radiation losses, the effect of compression is to raise the temperature as T/sub e/ approx.C/sup 6/5/, for constant tau/sub p/.
D-0 End Calorimeter Warm Tube/TeV Dry Air Purge
This Engineering Note studies the design of the Dry Air Purge that is going to flow through the Warm Tube of the End Calorimeter of the D-O Calorimeter. The Tev tubes through the E.C. can be thought of as a cluster of concentric tubes: The Tev tube, the warm (vacuum vessel) tube, 15 layers of superinsulation, the cold (argon vessel) tube, and the Inner Hadronic center support tube. The Dry Air Purge will involve flowing Dry Air through the annular region between the Warm Tube and the Tev Beam Pipe. This air flow is intended to prevent condensation from forming in this region which could turn to ice under cryogenic temperatures. Any ice formed in this gap, could cause serious problems when these tubes are moved. The Air will flow through a Nylon Tube Fitting -1/4-inch I.D. to 1/8-inch male pipe thread (Cole Palmer YB-06465-15) see Drawing MC-295221 (Appendix A). This fitting will be attached to the Nylon 2-inch Tube-Wiper and Seal Assembly which is clamped to the ends of the Warm Tube (Appendix A). This note includes drawings and calculations that explain the setup of the Dry Air Purge and give the required information on the pressure drops through the setup. The Equations and properties used in the calculations were obtained from the Applied Fluid Dynamics Handbook by Robert D. Blevins and Fluid Dynamics Second Edition by Frank M. White.
0-G experiments with advanced ceramic fabric wick structures
Both Air Force and NASA future spacecraft thermal management needs span the temperature range from cryogenic to liquid metals. Many of these needs are changing and not well defined and will remain so until goals, technology, and missions converge. Nevertheless, it is certain that high-temperature (> 800 K) and medium-temperature (about 450 K) radiator systems will have to be developed that offer significant improvements over current designs. This paper discusses experiments performed in the lower temperature regime as part of a comprehensive advanced ceramic fabric (ACF) heat pipe development program. These experiments encompassed wicking tests with various ceramic fabric samples, and heat transfer tests with a 1-m long prototype ACF water heat pipe. A prototype ceramic fabric/titanium water heat pipe has been constructed and tested; it transported up to 60 W of power at about 390 K. Startup and operation both with and against gravity examined. Wick testing was begun to aid in the design and construction of an improved prototype heat pipe, with a 38-{mu}m stainless steel linear covered by a biaxially-braided Nextel (trademark of the 3M Co., St. Paul, Minnesota) sleeve that is approximately 300-{mu}m thick. Wick testing took place in 1-g; limited testing in 0-g was initiated, and results to date suggest that in 0-g, wick performance improves over that in 1-g.
D-0 North End Cap Calorimeter Cold Test Results
The North endcap calorimeter vessel was recieved on July 1, 1990. A cooldown of the pressure vessel with liquid nitrogen was performed on July 10-11 to check the vessel's integrity. With the pressure vessel cold, the insulating vacuum was monitored for leaks. Through out the testing, the insulating vacuum remained good and the vessel passed the test. The cold test was carried out per the procedures of D-Zero engineering note 3740.220-EN-250. The test was very similar to the cold test performed on the Central Calorimeter in October of 1987. Reference D-Zero engineering notes 3740.210-EN-122, 3740.000-EN107, and 3740.210-EN-110 for information about the CC cold test. The insulating vacuum space was pumped on while equipment was being connected to the pressure vessel. Two hours after starting to pump with the blower the vacuum space pressure was at about 210 microns. Pumping on the vacuum space for the next 15 hours showed no progress and a leak detector was connected to the pumping line. A leak check showed a leak in a thermocouple feedthru on the vacuum space relief plate. After fixing the leak, the pressure dropped to 16 microns in less than one hour. A rate of rise test was performed starting at a pressure of 13 microns. The pressure rose to 39 microns within 8 minutes and then only rose to 43 microns in 2.5 hours (1.6 microns/hour). After all connections were made to the pressure vessel, a vacuum pump with an estimated effective pumping speed of about 70 scfm was valved on. The lowest pressure achieved after 2 days of pumping was 80 microns. Valving out the pump for 30 minutes resulted in a 5 micron per minute rate of rise. The rate of rise was considered acceptable since there were known leak paths through the bolts of the signal ...
D-0 South End Cap Calorimeter Cold Test Results
The South endcap calorimeter vessel was moved into Lab A on Sept. 18, 1990. A cooldown of the pressure vessel with liquid nitrogen was performed on Sept. 26 to check the vessel's integrity. With the pressure vessel cold, the insulating vacuum was monitored for leaks. Through out the testing, the insulating vacuum remained good and the vessel passed the test. The cold test was carried out per the procedures of D-Zero engineering note 3740.220-EN-250. The test was very similar to the cold test performed on the Central Calorimeter in October of 1987. The test of the ECS was performed in the same manner using the same equipment as the ECN cold test. Reference D-Zero engineering notes 3740.210-EN-122, 3740.000-EN-I07, and 3740.210-EN-II0 for information about the CC cold test. Reference EN-260 for the results of the ECN cold test. The insulating vacuum space was pumped on while equipment was being connected to the pressure vessel. Two hours after starting to pump with the blower the vacuum space pressure was at about 40 microns. The pumping continued overnight (another 16 hours). In the morning the pressure was 11.5 microns. A rate of rise test was performed. With the pump valved off, the pressure rose to 14 microns within 5 minutes and then rose to 16 microns in 6 hours (0.33 microns/hour). After all connections were made to the pressure vessel, a vacuum pump with an estimated effective pumping speed of about 70 scfm was valved on. After 18 hours, the pressure vessel was down to 270 microns. An additional day of pumping took the pressure down to only 250 microns. A leak was then found and fixed around the seal of the rupture disc. The pump was put on line again. The pressure vessel with pump on line was 27 microns after 16.5 ...
1-1/2-loop semiscale isothermal test program: program and system description in support of experiment data reports
No Description Available.
1.1-meter bore, 8-Tesla test facility
The design and fabrication of a 1.1-m bore superconducting coil for an 8- T facility at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are discussed. This facility will provide the backing field required for testing large multifilamentary Nb$sub 3$Sn coils as part of the superconductor development program at Livermore. The magnet measures 1.85 m o.d., is 1.5 m in length, and is solenoid wound in four separate modules. Total cold weight of the assembly is 18,000 Kg. A NbTi superconductor is used throughout with a gradation of current density within the magnet to provide complete cryostatic stability. The preliminary design of a large 3500-A multifilamentary Nb$sub 3$Sn insert magnet is also included. Together, the backing coil and insert magnets are designed to produce a 12-T central field in a 0.4m bore. The ''equal area'' theory of cryostatic stability is applied in the design of both magnet systems and is discussed in detail. A large open-mouth cryostat is used and measures 2 m in diameter and 3.7 m in length. Details of Dewar design and the refrigeration requirements are included. (auth)
1.1 Simulations of a Free-Electron Laser Oscillator at Jefferson Lab Lasing in the Vacuum Ultraviolet
The UVFEL at Jefferson Lab has provided a 10 eV photon beam for users by outcoupling the coherent third harmonic of the UVFEL operated at 372 nm. This can provide up to tens of milliwatts of power in the VUV. Operation of the FEL at the fundamental might enhance this power by up to a factor of 1000. With minor upgrades to the accelerator now underway and a new undulator proposed by Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. we show that we can lase in the fundamental at 124 nm. The predicted output is higher by four orders of magnitude on an average power basis and six orders of magnitude on a peak fluence basis than the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
1/2 Creep Fracture in Ceramic Polycrystals I. Creep Cavitation Effects in Polycrystalline Alumina
Fine grained polycrystalline alumina has been deformed in creep at high temperatures, to examine the evolution of cavities at grain boundaries. Cavities with equilibrium and crack-like morphologies have been observed, distributed non-uniformly throughout the material. The role of cavities during creep has been described. A transition from equilibrium to crack-like morphology has been observed and correlated with a model based on the influence of the surface to boundary diffusivity ratio and the local tensile stress. The contribution of cavitation to the creep rate and total creep strain has been analyzed and excluded as the principal cause of the observed non-linear creep rate,
1. 2-GeV damping-ring complex for the Stanford Linear Collider
The choice of parameters, the design, a 2-1/2 year consruction program and the early operation of a high field, high tune research and development damping ring complex for one of the two linear collider beams are described.
1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory
The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a dedicated synchrotron radiation facility optimized to generate soft x-ray and vacuum ultraviole (XUV) light using magnetic insertion devices, was proposed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in 1982. It consists of a 1.3-GeV injection system, an electron storage ring optimized at 1.3 GeV (with the capability of 1.9-GeV operation), and a number of photon beamlines emanating from twelve 6-meter-long straight sections, as shown in Fig. 1. In addition, 24 bending-magnet ports will be avialable for development. The ALS was conceived as a research tool whose range and power would stimulate fundamentally new research in fields from biology to materials science (1-4). The conceptual design and associated cost estimate for the ALS have been completed and reviewed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), but preliminary design activities have not yet begun. The focus in this paper is on the history of the ALS as an example of how a technical construction project was conceived, designed, proposed, and validated within the framwork of a national laboratory funded largely by the DOE.
1,2-HOIQO--A highly versatile 1,2-HOPO analog
A cyclic, bidentate hydroxamic acid binding unit based on an isoquinoline scaffold has been utilized for the synthesis of a hexadentate tripodal ligand based on the TREN backbone. This prototype for a new class of multidentate chelators forms mononuclear iron(III) complexes and one-dimensional coordination polymers with lanthanide(III) cations. The latter has been determined by single crystal X-ray analysis of the cerium species. The solid state structure in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c (C{sub 36}H{sub 34}CeN{sub 7}O{sub 11}, a = 12.341(2){angstrom}, b = 26.649(4){angstrom}, c = 10.621(2){angstrom}, {alpha} = {gamma} = 90{sup o}, {beta} = 96.753(3){sup o}, V = 3468.6(9) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 4) exhibits a trigonal-dodecahedral environment around the cerium cation. The proof of concept for the versatility of the new scaffold has been shown by the modification of the crucial precursor 3-carboxyiso-coumarin through electrophilic aromatic substitutions to yield the corresponding chlorosulfonated and nitrated analogs.
1,2-Hydroxypyridonates as Contrast Agents for Magnetic ResonanceImaging: TREN-1,2-HOPO
1,2-Hydroxypyridinones (1,2-HOPO) form very stable lanthanide complexes that may be useful as contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). X-ray diffraction of single crystals established that the solid state structures of the Eu(III) and the previously reported [Inorg. Chem. 2004, 43, 5452] Gd(III) complex are identical. The recently discovered sensitizing properties of 1,2-HOPO chelates for Eu(III) luminescence allow direct measurement of the number if water molecules in the metal complex. Fluorescence measurements of the Eu(III) complex corroborate that in solution two water molecules coordinate the lanthanide (q = 2) as proposed from the analysis of NMRD profiles. In addition, fluorescence measurements have verified the anion binding interactions of lanthanide TREN-1,2-HOPO complexes in solution, studied by relaxivity, revealing only very weak oxalate binding (K{sub A} = 82.7 {+-} 6.5 M{sup -1}). Solution thermodynamic studies of the metal complex and free ligand have been carried out using potentiometry, spectrophotometry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The metal ion selectivity of TREN-1,2-HOPO supports the feasibility of using 1,2-HOPO ligands for selective lanthanide binding [pGd = 19.3 (2); pZn = 15.2 (2), pCa = 8.8 (3)].
1.2 MW klystron for Asymmetric Storage Ring B Factory
A cw klystron operating at 476 MHz has been developed jointly by SLAC and Varian Associates. The unique set of characteristics of this tube were strongly guided by requirements of the fast feedback necessary to prevent oscillations of the storage ring beams caused by the detuned accelerating cavity. This requires a combination of bandwidth and short group delay within the klystron. The RF feedback stabilization scheme also requires amplitude modulation making it necessary to operate the klystron about 10% below saturation. Performance specifications and initial operating results are presented.
1/2 Sintering of Mullite-Containing Materials: I. Effect of Composition
Sintering behavior of mullite-containing powders was studied over a range of chemical compositions (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} ratio). Densification measurements were made for both liquid phase-containing and solid state systems. Small amounts of liquid phase were observed to have a significant effect on densification rate. A linear relationship was obtained between the percent of theoretical density and the logarithm of time for compositions in the range 73-75 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Currently available models for intermediate stage sintering kinetics were considered to be inadequate for these systems. Grain boundary transport 0r diffusion appeared to be the primary mechanism of densification.
1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab
At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.
1,3-Propanediol Made From Fermentation-Derived Malonic Acid: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Agriculture Project Fact Sheet
1,3-Propanediol is one of two ingredients used in producing polytrimethylene terephthalate (PTT), a polymer which can be used in polyester and nylon applications. Researchers are developing a process to ferment biomass feedstock to malonic acid using filamentous fungi and then catalytically convert malonic acid to 1,3-propanediol.
1.4 Natural Gas Combustion
This document focus's on the use of natural gas as a major combustion fuel and offers information on firing practices, emissions, and controls.
1.5% boron, stainless steel
No Description Available.
1. 5 GeV/c multiturn shaving extraction and its transport line for the Brookhaven AGS
A system for fast shaving extraction at 1.5 GeV/c is implemented to extract the circulating beam in five turns. A numerical simulation is first carried out to determine the emittance and the rf structure of the extracted beam. This is followed by several machine study sessions which establish the optimal extraction configuration, confirm the emittance, and modify the transport line for low energy beam. Finally, a one-week run for the Neutrino Oscillation experiment demonstrates that the system is very stable and capable of delivering 7.5 x 10/sup 12/ p/sec with 70% extraction efficiency and 95% transport efficiency.
A 1.5 GeV compact light source with superconducting bending magnets
This paper describes the design of a compact electron synchrotron light source for producing X-rays for medical imaging, protein crystallography, nano-machining and other uses up to 35 keV. The source will provide synchrotron light from six 6.9 tesla superconducting 60{degree} bending magnet stations. In addition the ring, contains conventional quadrupoles and sextupoles. The light source has a circumference of 26 meters, which permits it to be located in a variety of industrial and medical facilities.
1.5-GeV FFAG Accelerator for the AGS Facility
1. 5 megawatt dc chopper power supplies for plasma shape control on Doublet III
The Doublet III device is designed to study noncircular plasmas, including doublet and dee-shaped cross-sections. The plasma shape is determined by a system of 24 field-shaping coils which surround the vacuum vessel. Control of the magnetic flux linking these coils allows the plasma shape to be varied and controlled. This paper describes the high-speed dc chopper which is a major component of the field-shaping coil power system. The high-speed dc choppers, with a frequency response of up to 5 kHz and a switching power capability of 1.5 megawatts are used for fine tuning and feedback control of the plasma position and shape. The design and operation of two 1.5 megawatt, 3 kHz choppers used on closed loop plasma control experiments will be presented.
No Description Available.
1.06 μm 150 psec laser damage study of diamond turned, diamond turned/ polished and polished metal mirrors
Using a well characterized 1.06 μm 150 ps glass laser pulse the damage characteristics for diamond turned, diamond turned/ polished, and polished copper and silver mirrors less than 5 cm diameter were studied. Although most samples were tested with a normal angle of incidence, some were tested at 45$sup 0$ with different linear polarization showing an increase in damage threshold for S polarization. Different damage mechanisms observed will be discussed. Laser damage is related to residual surface influences of the fabrication process. First attempts to polish diamond turned surfaces resulted in a significant decrease in laser damage threshold. The importance of including the heat of fusion in the one dimensional heat analysis of the theoretical damage threshold and how close the samples came to the theoretical damage threshold is discussed. (auth) Site system engineering implementation Fiscal Year 1998 multi-year work plan
Manage the Site Systems Engineering process to provide a traceable, integrated, requirements-driven, and technically defensible baseline., Through the Site Integration Group, Systems Engineering ensures integration of technical activities across all site projects. Systems Engineering`s primary interfaces are with the Project Direction Office and with the projects, as well as with the Planning organization.
1.8.3 Site system engineering FY 1997 program plan
The FY 1997 Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP) technical baseline describes the functions to be accomplished and the technical standards that govern the work. The following information is provided in this FY 1997 MYWP: technical baseline, work breakdown structure, schedule baseline, cost baseline, and execution year.
A 1.8 Mev K+ injector for the high current beam transport experiment fusion
For the High Current Beam Transport Experiment (HCX) at LBNL, an injector is required to deliver up to 1.8 MV of 0.6 A K{sup +} beam with an emittance of {approx}1 p-mm-mrad. We have successfully operated a 10-cm diameter surface ionization source together with an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator to meet these requirements. The pulse length is {approx}4 {micro}s, firing at once every 10-15 seconds. By optimizing the extraction diode and the ESQ voltages, we have obtained an output beam with good current density uniformity, except for a small increase near the beam edge. Characterization of the beam emerging from the injector included measurements of the intensity profile, beam imaging, and transverse phase space. These data along with comparison to computer simulations provide the knowledge base for designing and understanding future HCX experiments.
1?10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential: Independent Review
This independent review examines the status and technical potential of 1-10 kW stationary combined heat and power fuel cell systems and analyzes the achievability of the DOE cost, efficiency, and durability targets for 2012, 2015, and 2020.
1.5D Quasilinear Model for Alpha Particle-TAE Interaction in ARIES ACT-I
We study the TAE interaction with alpha particle fusion products in ARIES ACT-I using the 1.5D quasilinear model. 1.5D uses linear analytic expressions for growth and damping rates of TAE modes evaluated using TRANSP pro les to calculates the relaxation of pressure pro les. NOVA- K simulations are conducted to validate the analytic dependancies of the rates, and to normalize their absolute value. The low dimensionality of the model permits calculating loss diagrams in large parameter spaces.
The purpose of this task was to determine if mixing was an issue for the entrainment and dispersion of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) solvent in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Strip Effluent Feed Tank (SEFT). The MCU strip effluent stream containing the Cs removed during salt processing will be transferred to the DWPF for immobilization in HLW glass. In lab-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing, mixing of the solvent in the dilute nitric acid solution proved problematic, and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to perform scaled SEFT mixing tests to evaluate whether the problem was symptomatic of the lab-scale set-up or of the solvent. The solvent levels tested were 228 and 235 ppm, which represented levels near the estimated DWPF solvent limit of 239 ppm in 0.001M HNO{sub 3} solution. The 239 ppm limit was calculated by Norato in X-CLC-S-00141. The general approach for the mixing investigation was to: (1) Investigate the use of fluorescent dyes to aid in observing the mixing behavior. Evaluate and compare the physical properties of the fluorescent dyed MCU solvents to the baseline Oak Ridge CSSX solvent. Based on the data, use the dyed MCU solvent that best approximates the physical properties. (2) Use approximately a 1/6th linear scale of the SEFT to replicate the internal configuration for DWPF mixing. (3) Determine agitator speed(s) for scaled testing based on the DWPF SEFT mixing speed. (4) Perform mixing tests using the 1/6th SEFT and determine any mixing issues (entrainment/dispersion, accumulation, adhesion) through visual observations and by pulling samples to assess uniformity. The mixing tests used MCU solvent fabricated at SRNL blended with Risk Reactor DFSB-K43 fluorescent dye. This dyed SRNL MCU solvent had equivalent physical properties important to mixing as compared to the Oak Ridge baseline solvent, ...
1- and 2-D computer analysis of an HDL stress wave switch
No Description Available.
E-1 CAM Revision 4
No Description Available.
E-1 common analog model
No Description Available.
E-1 common analog model. Revision 6.1 (RN-S-0469)
No Description Available.
1-D Equilibrium Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo
We present a new hybrid Monte Carlo method for 1-D equilibrium diffusion problems in which the radiation field coexists with matter in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This method, the Equilibrium Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (EqDDMC) method, combines Monte Carlo particles with spatially discrete diffusion solutions. We verify the EqDDMC method with computational results from three slab problems. The EqDDMC method represents an incremental step toward applying this hybrid methodology to non-equilibrium diffusion, where it could be simultaneously coupled to Monte Carlo transport.
A 1-D model for highly sensitive tubular reactors
We consider the steady state operation of wall-cooled, fixed-bed tubular reactors. In these reactors the temperature rise ..delta..T must normally be limited to small fractions of the adiabatic temperature rise ..delta..T/sub ad/, both to avoid runaway and maintain product selectivity. Yet ..delta..T/..delta..T/sub ad/ << 1 can only occur if eta = t/sub dif//t/sub reac/ << 1, where t/sub dif/ is the timescale on which heat escapes the reactor by ''diffusing'' to the cooled walls, and t/sub reac/ is the timescale over which the reaction occurs. So here we use asymptotic methods based on eta << 1 to analyze the 2-d reactor equations, and find the radial concentration and temperature profiles to leading order in eta. We then obtain a 1-d model of the reactor by substituting these asymptotically correct profiles into the reactor equations and averaging over r. This model, the ..cap alpha..-model, is identical to the standard (Beek and Singer) 1-d model, except that the reactor's overall heat transfer coefficient U is a decreasing function of the temperature rise ..delta..T. This occurs because as ..delta..T increases, the reaction becomes increasingly concentrated near r = 0, causing a decreased heat transfer efficiency through the reactor's walls. By comparing it with numerical solutions of the original 2-d reactor equations, we find that the ..cap alpha..-model simulates the 2-d equations very accurately, even for highly sensitive reactors operated near runaway. We also find that a runaway criterion derived from the ..cap alpha..-model predicts the runaway transition of the original 2-d equations accurately, especially for highly sensitive reactors. 19 refs.