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Wyoming Emergency Management and Homeland Security Statutory Authorities Summarized
This report is one of a series that profiles the emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and three territories (American Samoa, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). Each profile identifies the more significant elements of state statutes, generally as codified. This report focuses on the state of Wyoming.
Water Rights Related to Oil Shale Development in the Upper Colorado River Basin
Concerns over fluctuating oil prices and declining petroleum production worldwide have revived interest in oil shale as a potential resource. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (P.L. 109-58) identified oil shale as a strategically important domestic resource and directed the Department of the Interior to promote commercial development. Oil shale development would require significant amounts of water, however, and water supply in the Colorado River Basin, where several oil shale reserves are located, is limited. This report will provide a brief overview of water rights in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, including changes that may be made to currently held water rights and the possibility for abandonment of unused water rights.
Analyses of Coals in the United States with Descriptions of Mine and Field Samples Collected between July 1, 1904 and June 30, 1910 Part 2. Descriptions of Samples
From Introduction: "This volume contains the descriptions of the samples whose analyses are published in the preceding volume, Part I of this bulletin. The descriptions have been compiled from the notebooks of the persons who collected the samples, have been condensed from accounts given in published reports of the United States Geological Survey, or have furnished by the collection themselves. Inasmuch as the descriptions represent the work of many persons during a period of six years, and inasmuch as they were recorded under widely differing conditions, they necessarily vary in fullness detail."
Coal-Mine Accidents in the United States and Foreign Countries
From Introduction: "The lack of comparable and accurate statistics of coal-mine accidents in the united States as a whole led the Bureau of Mines in 1911 to undertake the collection of such data. The mining departments of the leading foreign coal-producing countries have long taken cognizance of the importance of statistics. The bureau feels that in presenting the tables embodied in this report it is offering the and comparable statistics of coal-min accidents for the country as a whole that have ever been published."
Oil and Gas Wells through Workable Coal Beds: Papers and Discussions
From Preface: "In carrying out such a policy with reference to the subject under consideration, the Bureau of Mines invited the State geologists, mine inspectors, and a number of coal operators and oil and gas well drillers from the States interested to meet representatives of the Bureau of Mines in Pittsburgh, Pa., for a discussion of the subject during February 7 and February 8, 1913. This adjourned meeting of the conference will be held at an early date and its report will be printed in a later edition of this bulletin, with such additional suggestions as may be received by the Bureau of Mines. The bureau will be glad, therefore, to receive at the earliest practicable date any additional suggestions or any additional information throwing light on the matters discussed in this bulletin."
Analyses of Coals in the United States with Descriptions of Mine and Field Samples Collected between July 1, 1904 and June 30, 1910: Part 1. -- Analyses
From Significance and value of Analyses of Coal: "The analyses published in this report cover samples of coal collected in many different parts of the country with unusual care by experiences men, in such manner as to make them representative of extensive beds of coal."
Operation of Experimental Plant for Producing Alumina from Anorthosite
From Preface: "This Bulletin provides a permanent record of the operation of an experimental alumina plant by the Bureau of Mines at Laramine, Wyo. The broad purpose of this experimental program was to appraise the technologic and economic feasibility of producing aluminum from nonbauxitic ores."
Analyses of Tipple and Delivered Samples of Coal: (Collected During the Fiscal Years 1948 to 1950 Inclusive)
From Forward: "This bulletin is the first of a new series, which includes analyses of only tipple and delivered coal. It covers samples collected throughout the United States from July 1, 1947 to June 30, 1950 (fiscal years 1948-50). It is planned that future publications of this series will cover a period of one fiscal year only and be issued as soon as possible after June 30 of each year."
Barrier Pillars in Wyoming Basin, Northern Field: Anthracite Region of Pennsylvania
From Introduction: "The purpose of this report is to furnish factual data on barrier pillars that enter into the water problem of the Wyoming Basin; these data will, in turn, be helpful in solving the anthracite-mine-water problem of the Northern field."
Flood Prevention in Anthracite Mines, Northern Field: Anthracite Region of Pennsylvania, Project Number 3 (Wyoming)
From Scope of Report: "This report covers the following: (a) A brief description of the work contemplated under Project No. 3 as an integral part of the Conowingo tunnel system; (b) an economic discussion of the area affected; (c) the geology and hydrology of the Northern field, including the Wyoming Basin; (d) the basic problem, plans, and costs, and the construction schedule of the project; (e) an economic analysis and a justification for the project; (f) recommendations and cooperation of local interests; and (g) final conclusions."
Asbestos
From Introduction: "This report covers the essential features of the asbestos industry, including occurrence, production, mining, milling, utilization, international trade, and marketing."
Coal Deposit, Coal Creek District, Gunnison County Colorado: Reserves, Coking Properties, and Petrographic and Chemical Characteristics
From Introduction: "A preliminary report of the work was published in April 1947, and this bulletin supplements Report of Investigations 4104 and describes the results of the entire investigation."
Microscopic Structure and Concentratability of the Important Iron Ores of the United States
Outline of Problem: "This paper covers a survey of 19 ores collected from seven of the more important iron-ore districts of the United States and is a contribution by the ore-dressing section of the United States Bureau of Mines to general research program on iron and steel being conducted by the Bureau."
Production and Briquetting of Carbonized Lignite
From Introduction: "The Bureau of Mines since its establishment has always taken an active interest in the utilization of lignite and in the development of the lignite deposits of the United States. Extensive lignite fields occur in the west central States, notably in North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, and Texas; there are smaller areas in several other Sates, some of which are widely separated."
Coal-Washing Investigations: Methods and Tests
From Introduction: "The investigations described in this bulletin are confined to a study of the washing characteristics of bituminous coals. The washing characteristics of coals from many of the most important coal-producing fields of the Eastern and Central States were examined."
Thermal Solution and Hydrogenation of Green River Oil Shale: Experimental Investigations and Bibliography
From Introduction: "This so-called thermal-solution process and a modification of it, wherein the conversion is carried out under a high partial pressure of hydrogen, have been studied at the Petroleum and Oil-Shale Experiment Station, Laramie, Wyo., to determine their applicability to Green River oil shale. The results of this work are presented in this report."
Flood Prevention in Anthracite Mines: Anthracite Region of Pennsylvania, Projects Numbers 4 and 5
From Scope of Reports: "This report covers the following: (a) A brief description of the work proposed under Projects Nos. 4 and 5; (b) the topography, geology and hydrology of the area into which the sections of the proposed tunnel are to be driven; (c) plans, costs, and construction schedules of the projects; and (d) conclusions and recommendations."
BRAC 2005 Report to the Base Closure and Realignment Commission: Army Justification Book
Disregard Restriction Header and Footer - RC Transformation in Wyoming - Impacted Sites: Cheyenne
Army Installations and State Action Papers - Wyoming
Disregard Restriction of Header and Footer: Army Installations and State Action Papers - Wyoming
2005 BRAC Commission Final COBRA Run - AASF JFHQ FMS Cheyenne (WAFB)
2005 BRAC Commission Final COBRA Run - AASF JFHQ FMS Cheyenne (WAFB) - 49 - RC Transformation in Wyoming
Final Cobra Run - Army RC Transformation Cheyenne Wyoming
Final Cobra Run - Army RC Transformation Cheyenne Wyoming
BRAC 2005 Report to the Base Closure and Realignment Commission: Army Justification Book
COBRA Program - RC Transformation in Wyoming
Variable Characteristics of the Oil in the Tensleep Sandstone Reservoir, Elk Basin Field, Wyoming and Montana
Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines on the characteristics of oil obtained from the Tensleep Sandstone Reservoir. The samples collected are analyzed for physical characteristics and presented in tables and graphs. The report also includes a map.
Trends in the Use of Energy in the Western States, With Particular Reference to Coal
Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines on energy consumption in the western United States. A focus on coal as the primary energy source is presented. This report includes tables, graphs, maps, and illustrations.
Investigations of Salt River Vanadium Deposits, Lincoln County, Wyoming
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over studies conducted on the vanadium deposits of Lincoln County, Wyoming. As stated in the introduction, "the work performed by the Bureau of Mines is explained in detail and supplemented with plans, sections, and a complete set of sample analyses. Proposed mining methods are discussed, and metallurgical tests are outlined" (p. 2). This report includes tables, maps, and illustrations.
Investigation of Sublette Ridge Vanadium Deposit, Lincoln County, Wyoming
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over studies conducted on vanadium deposits in Lincoln County. As noted in the introduction, "the following report covers the history of the district, outlines the physical features and communications, mentions the property, and notes the ownership. The deposits and ore are described, and work performed by the Bureau of Mines is explained in detail" (p. 1). This report includes tables, and maps.
Investigation of Casper Mountain Chromite Deposits, Natrona County, Wyoming
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over a large chromite deposit on Casper Mountain. Description of the deposit is listed. This report includes tables, maps, and illustrations.
Mining Program: Bureau of Mines Oil-Shale Project, Rifle, Colorado
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines on the development of efficient mining methods for producing oil shale. Characteristics of the oil shale deposits of the Green River are presented. The results of core drilling and sampling in this area are also listed. This report includes tables, illustrations, maps, and photographs.
Investigation of Tuffs Near Lysite, Wyoming for Selenium
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over studies conducted on seleniferous tuff deposits in Wyoming. Results of the tuff samples obtained are presented. This report includes tables, maps, photographs, and illustrations.
Oil Yields and Stratigraphy of the Green River Formation's Tipton Member at Bureau of Mines Sites Near Green River, Wyoming
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over the oil yields at the Green River. The average oil yields from the area are discussed. This report includes tables, and illustrations.
Laramie Sponge-Iron Pilot Plant
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over studies conducted on the pilot plant in Laramie County, Wyoming. As stated in the introduction, "the purpose of this report is to record information derived from recent experimental work that had as its objective the development and demonstration of one method of producing sponge iron" (p. 2). This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Reconnaissance of Titaniferous Sandstone Deposits of Utah, Wyoming, New Mexico, and Colorado
Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over heavy sandstone deposits in the Four-State area of the U.S. Details of the geology and an estimate of resources are presented. This report includes tables, maps, and illustrations.
The Beet Leaf-Beetle and Its Control
Report discussing the beet leaf-beetle, which is common in the Rocky Mountain region. Discussion include physical appearance, geographic distribution, life cycle, affected plants, and methods of control.
The Durum Wheats
Report discussing the different varieties of durum wheat, their various uses, and areas to which they are best adapted. Among the varieties discussed are Kubanka, Arnautka, Mindum, Buford, Acme, Monad, Marouani, Pentad, and Peliss.
Growing Hard Spring Wheat
"This bulletin discusses the topographic, soil, and climatic features of the northern Great Plains, with special reference to the production of hard spring wheat in that area. Cultural methods for growing the crop are given." -- title
Sheeps, Hogs, and Horses in the Pacific Northwest
This bulletin gives a broad overview of the livestock industry in the Pacific Northwest with respect to sheep and hogs; there is also a brief discussion of the horse industry. I. Sheep Husbandry. II. Hog Raising. III. The Horse Industry.
Rape as a Forage Crop
Report discussing the cultivation of the rape plant as a forage crop, including its varieties, soil requirements and preparation, and harvesting. Also describes various uses of rape as a forage crop, weed destroyer, and cover crop.
Winter Emmer
"In recent years [the] cultivation [of emmer] has greatly increased.... There are both spring and winter varieties, but the emmer crop of the United States heretofore has been almost entirely spring sown. This paper treats of winter emmer and the importance of using winter varieties for certain conditions and in certain districts. The general description of emmer, its history, etc., are applicable equally to spring or winter varieties." -- p. 5
Sixty-Day and Kherson Oats
Report discussing the results of experiments undertaken to determine the viability of early oats in different regions of the United States since early oats typically thrive only in the Corn Belt and Great Plains regions.
Advice to Forest Planters in the Plains Regions
"Advice about tree planting to provide a windbreak and a supply of firewood, fence posts, and wood for repairs should be especially valuable to the settler in the Plains region. This bulletin gives advice that will enable him to select the species of trees that will bring the most profitable returns without overburdening him with care. Following the description of each species of tree adapted to the region, the points to be avoided in connection with its planting are summarized in a few concise 'dont's.' Information and advice also are given regarding time for planting, methods of cultivation, pruning, etc." -- p. 2
Growing Winter Wheat on the Great Plains
"This bulletin is intended to answer the requests for information on the production of winter wheat on the Great Plains under dry-farming conditions that arise from the stimulus of a present and prospective price much higher than that under which the agriculture of the section has been developed and from the campaign for a large increase in the crop to meet the necessities of war conditions." -- p. 3. Topics discussed include wheat varieties and seeding.
The Alfalfa Weevil and Methods of Controlling It
"The alfalfa weevil destroys a great deal of alfalfa in northern Utah and southern Idaho. It also inhabits southwestern Wyoming and is spreading slowly to new territory in all directions. It may in time infest most of the United States. The adult, a small brown snout-beetle, and the larva, a green, worm-like creature, usually escape notice during the first two or three years that they are present in a locality, but as soon as they become numerous enough to do harm they are readily found, and their effect upon the appearance of the fields is conspicuous. Vigorous treatment is then necessary to prevent partial or total destruction of the first and second crops. The purpose of this bulletin is to show how serious the attack is to the farmer, how much territory it embraces and how it spreads, and to describe the insect, its work, and the methods which are effective in dealing with it." -- title page
Growing Fruit for Home Use in the Great Plains Area
This report gives recommendations to farmers in the Great Plains of the United States who would like to grow fruit in this region in which fruit is not commonly cultivated. Topics discussed include climate and soil requirements, pruning, irrigation, orchard pests, injury from hail, and suggested fruit varieties.
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
"This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Because strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove helpful to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "Strawberries can be grown in those parts of the western Untied States in which ordinary farm crops are irrigated as well as in western Oregon and Washington, where irrigation is not essential but may be profitable. The principles of irrigating strawberries are essentially the same as those for other crops. Because strawberries are sensitive to the alkali salts that irrigation brings to the surface, such salts must be washed out or skimmed off. The strawberry grower, after choosing a suitable site and preparing the soil carefully, should select varieties adapted to his district and needs. He should use plants that are disease-free. In California, southern Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas the plants should have undergone a rest period. Usually the growers plant during the period of greatest rainfall. By using the recommended systems of training and care before, during, and after setting of the plants and the suggested methods of decreasing diseases and insect pests, he should obtain better yields. A grower can furnish consumers a better product by using good methods of harvesting and shipment. He can prolong the fresh-fruit season only a little by the use of cold storage, but he can extend his market by growing varieties suitable for preserving, canning, and freezing." -- p. ii
Implements and Methods of Tillage to Control Soil Blowing on the Northern Great Plains
This bulletin tools and methods of tilling which can help reduce or control soil blowing and soil erosion on farms in the northern Great Plains of the United States. Among the crops discussed with relation to tilling methods are beans, corn, sorghum, potatoes, alfalfa, and sweet clover.
Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States
"The information given in this bulletin should enable farmers in the Great Plains and Western States to select from the more common species of grasses some one or more suited to their needs [for soil and water conservation]. Common harvesting equipment and farm machinery can be adapted to the proper handling of native grasses. This brings the cost of such work within the means of most farmers." -- p. i. Among the grasses discussed are wheatgrass, buffalo grass, bluestem, grama, Bermuda grass, wild rye, hilaria, Sudan grass, bluegrass, panic grasses, dropseed, and needlegrass.