UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 60 Matching Results

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Agriculture: Bioconversion of sugar cane molasses

Description: Auxein Corporation is demonstrating for commercial use an organic acid phytochelate, derived from what would otherwise be a discarded portion of sugar cane, that could increase the domestic sugar industry's profit margin from near zero to 7%. Along with helping a struggling industry, the phytochelate will bring substantial improvements to crop and tree production and greatly reduce the environmental threat posed by nitrogen-based fertilizers. Currently, the amount of fertilizer used produces harmful levels of run-off that contaminates ground water with unwanted nitrogen. By utilizing organic acid phytochelates, which assist plant growth by unlocking minerals stored in soil, fertilizer use can be dramatically reduced. This would improve crop yields, remove environmental threats to ground water, and cut fertilizer costs by as much as 50%.
Date: September 29, 1999
Creator: Simon, P.

Airplane structures.

Description: Describes structural details of service airplanes used by the Army Air Corps, sufficient for personnel to perform inspection and maintenance of their equipment.
Date: October 29, 1941
Creator: United States. War Department.

Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 3 No. 3

Description: The alternative fuel industry is heating up. It is a very exciting time to be in the energy business, especially when it comes to transportation. Celebrating of the milestone 75th Clean Cities coalition and kick off of the new Federal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) USER Program is occurring in cities across the country. Clean Energy for the 21st Century and the events that are happening during Energy Awareness Month are covered in this issue. Spotlighted are niche markets; several airports across the country are successfully incorporating alternative fuels into their daily routines.
Date: October 29, 1999
Creator: DOE, Clean Cities Program at

Aluminum: Aluminum Scrap Decoater

Description: NICE3 and the Philip Services Corporation are cost-sharing a demonstration project to decoat metal using indirect-fired controlled-atmosphere (IDEX) kilns, which can both process solid organics such as rubber and plastics, and minimize dust formation and emission of volatile organic compounds. The publication explains how this cost-effective, two-step system operates.
Date: January 29, 1999
Creator: Blazek, S.

Aluminum: Improved System Yields $100,000 Annual Savings

Description: In another Office of Industrial Technologies Motor Challenge Success Story, Alcoa (formerly Alumax) aluminum reduced annual energy consumption by 12% and reduced both maintenance and noise levels. Order this fact sheet now to learn how your company can both increase energy efficiency and decrease pollution.
Date: January 29, 1999
Creator: Ericksen, E.

Aluminum: Recycling of Aluminum Dross/Saltcake

Description: As this NICE3 publication details, the objective of this project is to commercialize the process technology to eliminate all landfill waste associated with black dross and saltcake generated from aluminum recycling in the United States.
Date: January 29, 1999
Creator: Blazek, S.

Aluminum: Reducing chloride emissions from aluminum production

Description: Reynolds Metals Company (RMC), with assistance from a NICE{sup 3} grant, is developing for commercialization a closed-loop control process that greatly reduces chlorine emissions and increases plant efficiency while maintaining metal quality. The process still utilizes chlorine to remove impurities during aluminum processing, but is more effective than current methods. With the new technology chlorine in the stack is monitored and input chlorine is adjusted continuously. This optimization of chlorine use results in substantially less waste because less chlorine has to be bought or produced by aluminum manufacturers. This innovation is a significant improvement over conventional aluminum treatments, in which chlorine is injected in a more costly and wasteful manner. By the year 2010, the new technology has the potential to reduce the energy it takes to create chlorine by 8.4 billion Btu per year and to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 1,377 tons per year.
Date: September 29, 1999
Creator: Simon, P.

Aluminum: Reflective Aluminum Chips

Description: This fact sheet reveals how the use of reflective aluminum chips on rooftops cuts down significantly on heat absorption, thus decreasing the need for air conditioning. The benefits, including energy savings that could reach the equivalent of 1.3 million barrels of oil annually for approximately 100,000 warehouses, are substantial.
Date: January 29, 1999
Creator: Recca, L.

Application of NMR Methods to Identify Detection Reagents for Use in the Development of Robust Nanosensors

Description: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for studying bi-molecular interactions at the atomic scale. Our NMR lab is involved in the identification of small molecules, or ligands that bind to target protein receptors, such as tetanus (TeNT) and botulinum (BoNT) neurotoxins, anthrax proteins and HLA-DR10 receptors on non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cancer cells. Once low affinity binders are identified, they can be linked together to produce multidentate synthetic high affinity ligands (SHALs) that have very high specificity for their target protein receptors. An important nanotechnology application for SHALs is their use in the development of robust chemical sensors or biochips for the detection of pathogen proteins in environmental samples or body fluids. Here, we describe a recently developed NMR competition assay based on transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (trNOESY) that enables the identification of sets of ligands that bind to the same site, or a different site, on the surface of TeNT fragment C (TetC) than a known ''marker'' ligand, doxorubicin. Using this assay, we can identify the optimal pairs of ligands to be linked together for creating detection reagents, as well as estimate the relative binding constants for ligands competing for the same site.
Date: April 29, 2004
Creator: Cosman, M; Krishnan, V V & Balhorn, R

Base Visit Book - AF30

Description: Contains Base Visit Book for Sheppard Air Force Base, TX
Date: November 29, 2005
Creator: United States. Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission.

Base Visit Book - DFAS

Description: Contains the Base Visit Book for Defense Finance & Accounting Service Columbus, OH/ Denver, CO
Date: November 29, 2005
Creator: United States. Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission.

Base Visit Book - NAS Brunswick, ME (2nd Visit)

Description: Contains Base Visit Report by Navy Team Analyst Hal Tickle for the second trip to NAS Brunswick, ME
Date: November 29, 2005
Creator: United States. Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission.

BRAC Commission Briefing Book

Description: Contains BRAC Commission briefing materials from May 2-4, 2005
Date: November 29, 2005
Creator: United States. Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission.

Chapter 9: Model Systems for Formation and Dissolution of Calcium Phosphate Minerals

Description: Calcium phosphates are the mineral component of bones and teeth. As such there is great interest in understanding the physical mechanisms that underlie their growth, dissolution, and phase stability. Control is often achieved at the cellular level by the manipulation of solution states and the use of crystal growth modulators such as peptides or other organic molecules. This chapter begins with a discussion of solution speciation in body fluids and relates this to important crystal growth parameters such as the supersaturation, pH, ionic strength and the ratio of calcium to phosphate activities. We then discuss the use of scanning probe microscopy as a tool to measure surface kinetics of mineral surfaces evolving in simplified solutions. The two primary themes that we will touch on are the use of microenvironments that temporally evolve the solution state to control growth and dissolution; and the use of various growth modifiers that interact with the solution species or with mineral surfaces to shift growth away from the lowest energy facetted forms. The study of synthetic minerals in simplified solution lays the foundation for understand mineralization process in more complex environments found in the body.
Date: July 29, 2006
Creator: Orme, C. A. & Giocondi, J. L.

Chemicals: UV-curable coating for aluminum can production

Description: Fact sheet on curing aluminum can coatings written for the NICE3 Program. Coors Brewing Company has been using ultraviolet (UV) light curing technology on its aluminum beverage cans for 25 years. The company is now looking to share its cost-saving technology with other aluminum can producers. Traditional curing methods for creating external decorations on cans rely on convective-heat ovens to cure ink and over-varnish coatings. These thermal-curing methods require large amounts of energy and money, and can have unintended environmental impacts. Coors' technique uses coating materials that cure when exposed to UV light, thereby eliminating the expensive heat treatments used by conventional coating methods. Additionally, the UV-coating process creates much lower emissions and a smaller pollution waste stream than rival thermal processes because it requires much less solvent than thermal processes. This technology can be used not only in the aluminum can industry, but in the automotive, airline, wood, paper, and plastics industries, as well.
Date: September 29, 1999

Combined Heat and Power: Coal-Fired Air Turbine (CAT)-Cycle Plant

Description: By combining an integrated system with a gas turbine, coal-fired air turbine cycle technology can produce energy at an efficiency rate of over 40%, with capital and operating costs below those of competing conventional systems. Read this fact sheet to discover the additional benefits of this exciting new technology.
Date: January 29, 1999
Creator: Recca, L.

Development of U.S. Regulations for the Transportation of Radioactive Materials - A Look Back Over the Past 40 Years

Description: The discussion in this Chapter is a relatively straightforward, chronological description of the development of U.S. transportation regulations for radioactive materials over the past 40 years. Although primarily based on the development of U.S. regulations for the shipment of what is now known as Type B quantities of radioactive materials, the information presented details the interactions between a number of U.S. governmental agencies, commissions, and departments, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). For the most part, the information that follows was taken directly from the Federal Register, between 1965 and 2004, which, within the boundaries of the U.S., is considered law, or at least policy at the federal level. Starting in 1978, however, the information presented also takes a look at a series of so-called Guidance Documents, including Regulatory Guides (Reg. Guides), NUREGs, and NUREG/CRs. Developed originally by the U.S. Atomic Energy Agency (AEC), and later adapted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NUREGs and NUREG/CRs cited in this Chapter clearly specify a preferred methodology that can be used to meet the regulatory requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR Part 71, or, more simply, 10 CFR 71). As is appropriate for the discussion in this Chapter, the methodology preferred by the NRC, not as law but as guidance, was adapted directly from the requirements of the ASME's Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code. The information provided below is provided with little embellishment. By taking the information directly from the Federal Register, it becomes a story that tells itself. The information is self-consistent, and it provides all of the details behind the numerous policy decisions that led to the development of the U.S. regulations, as they were in their time, and as they are now.
Date: August 29, 2005
Creator: Hafner, R. S.

Forest Products: Acoustic Humidity Sensor

Description: The new acoustic sensor, designed as a humidity-control system for the paper and textile industries, can both eliminate overdrying and improve product quality by measuring humidity precisely. This new fact sheet explains how the process works.
Date: January 29, 1999
Creator: Poole, L. & Recca, L.

Forest Products: Apparatus for Removing Bark from Whole Logs

Description: Order this fact sheet now to learn how replacing the ''closed drum'' debarking technology method used in the forest industry with the ''open drum'' method saves time and production costs, and increases the economic value of wood products by inflicting less damage on logs so that they can be used for high-value economic products.
Date: January 29, 1999
Creator: Poole, L & Recca, L.

Forest products: Fiber loading for paper manufacturing

Description: Fact sheet on manufacturing filler during paper manufacturing written for the NICE3 Program. With its new fiber loading process, Voith Sulzer, Inc., is greatly improving the efficiency of paper production and recycling. Fiber loading produces precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) filler in the pulp recycling process at costs below conventional means. Fiber loading allows papermakers to use as much filler, like PCC, as possible because it costs 80% less than fiber. In addition, increased filler and fines retention due to fiber loading reduces the quantity of greenhouse gas emissions, deinking sludge, and other waste while substantially lowering energy costs. Currently, the most efficient way to produce PCC as filler is to make it in a satellite plant adjacent to a paper mill. Satellite plants exist near large scale paper mills (producing 700 tons per day) because the demand at large mills justifies building a costly ($15 million, average) satellite plant. This new fiber loading process combines the PCC manufacturing technology used in a satellite plant with the pulp processing operations of a paper mill. It is 33% less expensive to augment an existing paper mill with fiber loading technology than to build a satellite plant for the same purpose. This technology is applicable to the manufacturing of all printing and writing paper, regardless of the size or capacity of the paper mill.
Date: September 29, 1999