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The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer
This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. This bulletin gives the life history of the insect, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it. There are two generations in a season, so greater vigilance is necessary. The second generation passes the winter only in the corn roots, so if these are destroyed or plowed under deeply, the pest will be largely decreased. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the pest." -- p. 2
The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer
Revised edition. This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. There are two generations in a season. As the second generation passes the winter in the corn roots, if the roots are destroyed or plowed, the pest will be largely subdued. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the borer. This bulletin gives the life history of the borer, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it." -- p. ii
Farm Practices That Increase Crop Yields in Kentucky and Tennessee
"In the limestone and mountain districts south of the Ohio River there is much land that has been run down by continual cropping without rotation. In some places run-down land is left to grow up in weeds, wild grasses, and brush, a practice known as 'resting' the land. Where this sort of farm management is followed farm manure is largely wasted, little or no attention is paid to green-manure crops or other means of putting humus into the soil, and crop yields are very low. However, progressive farmers throughout the region who have built up run-down lands are now getting heavy yields. In the following pages are described some of the methods by which these farmers get results by making good use of farm manure and crop refuse, using legumes and grasses in regular rotations, and applying lime and commercial fertilizers." -- p. 2
Ways of Making Southern Mountain Farms More Productive
"The southern mountain farm often produces no more than a scant living for the family. Corn is the chief crop grown. Often part of the farm lies idle, being 'rested' while corn is grown on another part year after year until the land is worn out. By growing three or more crops in rotation, including clover, the farmer will be able to produce larger crops, make more money, and keep all crop land under cultivation all the time. Cattle, hogs, and sheep will not only add to the cash income, but will help to increase the fertility of the soil, and render larger crops possible. This bulletin describes crop rotations for small mountain farms in the southern Alleghenies, and gives complete directions for starting a crop rotation that will make poor mountain land more productive." -- p. 2
Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture
This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture
Revised edition. This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
Farm Practice in the Use of Commercial Fertilizers in the South Atlantic States
Report discussing the use of fertilizers on the more important soils of the South Atlantic States in the growing of staple farm crops. Factors which influence the use of commercial fertilizers such as crop rotation, legumes, and manure are discussed. In addition, methods for fertilizing cotton, corn, oats, wheat, and cowpea are discussed.
The Roundheaded Apple-Tree Borer
This report discusses the roundheaded apple-tree borer, an insect in the eastern and midwestern United States that, in its larval stage, destroys the bark and wood of apple trees. Several methods of control are discussed, including worming, paints and washes, and sprays.Apple-tree borers.
The Eelworm Disease of Wheat and Its Control
"The eelworm disease of wheat, long known in Europe, has been found during the past year causing considerable damage in Virginia and in isolated localities in West Virginia, Maryland, Georgia, and California. Every effort should be made to control the trouble in these infested regions, to prevent its further spread, and to find other localities where the disease may exist. The disease may be recognized on young and old plants and in the thrashed wheat by the descriptions given in this bulletin. The trouble may be controlled by use of clean seed, by crop rotation, and by sanitation. If clean seed cannot be procured from uninfested localities, diseased seed can be made safe for planting by the salt-brine treatment here described." -- p. 2
The Eelworm Disease of Wheat and Its Control
Revised edition. "The eelworm disease of wheat, long known in Europe, has been found during the past year causing considerable damage in Virginia and in isolated localities in West Virginia, Maryland, Georgia, and California. Every effort should be made to control the trouble in these infested regions, to prevent its further spread, and to find other localities where the disease may exist. The disease may be recognized on young and old plants and in the thrashed wheat by the descriptions given in this bulletin. The trouble may be controlled by use of clean seed, by crop rotation, and by sanitation. If clean seed cannot be procured from uninfested localities, diseased seed can be made safe for planting by the salt-brine treatment here described." -- p. 2
Hog Pastures for the Southern States
This bulletin describes how farmers in the southern United States can cultivate pastures for hogs using forage crops. Among the crops recommended are corn, sorghum, winter grains, alfalfa, several varieties of clover and beans, cowpeas, peanuts, chufas, sweet potatoes, mangels, and rape.
Eradication of Ferns from Pasture Lands in the Eastern United States
"There are nearly 7,500 recognized species of ferns in the world, of which number over 200 are known to be native to the United States. A few species have become weed pests in this country, and it is to a discussion of the control of these weedy ferns that this bulletin is devoted. The parts of the United States in which ferns are bad weeds are, principally, (1) the hill country of the Northeastern States and the higher portions of the Appalachian Mountain region as far south as Georgia, and (2) the Pacific coast country west of the Cascade Mountains.... This publication deals only with fern eradication in the Eastern States." -- p. 1-2
An Example of Intensive Farming in the Cotton Belt
"This paper is descriptive of the improvement of an area of poor land by growing ordinary field crops under a system of farm management which aims at the incorporation of liberal amounts of organic matter in the soil as the chief factor in maintaining fertility and increased crop yields -- a practice which can not be too frequently brought to the attention of farmers. This system has produced greater returns to the farmer who practices it than any other system in use in his locality and will serve as an object lesson to many small farmers in all parts of the country." -- p. 2
Farm Practices That Increase Crop Yields: The Gulf Coast Region
"Gulf Coast region upland soils are ordinarily deficient in nitrogen and need to be supplied with liberal quantities of organic matter if profitable crop yields are to be produced. This condition is most easily and cheaply remedied by growing such legumes as velvet beans, cowpeas, soy beans, bur clover, crimson clover, hairy vetch, and beggar weed, and by carefully utilizing all farm manures, crop residues, and other sources of humus. By a simple readjustment most of the cropping systems followed in this region may be made to include one or more legumes which will increase the supply of nitrogen and humus in the soil and greatly increase crop yields. Systems by means of which crop yields are being increased in the region are discussed in the following pages." -- p. 2
Muscadine Grapes
"Muscadine grapes are indigenous to the southeastern section of the United States, where they grow in greater or less profusion in the wild state. Through careful selection from the wild grapes and scientific breeding there have been developed a considerable number of varieties particularly adapted to the home needs in the Southeast, both as table grapes and as raw material for a variety of food and beverage products. Not being resistant to low winter temperatures they do not thrive in the northern grape districts. Muscadines are relatively resistant to grape diseases and insect pests and do well with a minimum of care, but, like most fruits, respond favorably to good cultural treatment. This bulletin sets forth in nontechnical form the information accumulated by the Department [of Agriculture] over a considerable period of years on muscadine grape varieties, their bleeding, culture, and uses." -- p. ii
Muscadine Grapes
Revised edition. "Muscadine grapes, which are native to the southeastern part of the United States, thrive in most soils of that region. They can be grown successfully in the Southeastern States, where American bunch grapes do not thrive. furthermore, they are suitable for home gardens as well as for commercial use. In fact they are perhaps the most satisfactory of all fruits for the home garden in this region. They cannot be grown, hoever, where temperatures as low as 0 °F occur habitually and may be injured at somewhat higher temperatures. Muscadine grapes are relatively uninjured by diseases and insects and produce well with a minimum of care, but they resopnd favorably to the good cultural practices recommended in this bulletin. The varieties described or listed produce fruit suitable for making unfermented juice, wine, jelly, and other culinary products and for eating fresh over a long season." -- p. ii
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed and instructions for constructing a concrete vat are given.
Cotton Diseases and Their Control
"The principal cotton diseases which cause damage in the Southern States are described and illustrated in the following pages and the best-known methods of controlling them are described." -- p. 3. Diseases discussed include wilt, root knot, anthracnose, bacterial blight, shedding of bolls, rust, Texas root rot, and other minor diseases.
Fig Growing in the South Atlantic and Gulf States
"This bulletin describes the varieties of figs most suitable for the South Atlantic and Gulf States, tells how to grow them and protect them from diseases and insects, and suggests methods of making them into desirable products for the table." -- p. 2
Fig Growing in the South Atlantic and Gulf States
"This bulletin tells about growing figs in the South Atlantic and Gulf States and protecting the figs from diseases and insects; it discusses the varieties commonly grown, and suggests methods of making the fruit into desirable products for the table." -- p. ii
Chestnut Blight
"Chestnut blight, caused by a fungus brought into this country from Asia before 1904, is responsible for the death of millions of acres of chestnut growth in New England and the Middle Atlantic States. The disease spread rapidly to nearly all parts of the range of the native chestnut, and the remaining stands of the southern Appalachians face certain destruction. The present known distribution, its symptoms, and the fungus that causes the disease are described. The blight fungus itself does not have any effect upon the strength of chestnut timber, and blight-killed trees can be utilized for poles, posts, cordwood, lumber, and extract wood. Search is being made for native and foreign chestnuts resistant to the disease in the hope of finding a tree suitable for replacing the rapidly disappearing stands. Seedlings of Asiatic chestnuts, which have considerable natural resistance even though not immune, are being tested in the United States." -- p. ii
Feeding Hogs in the South
Report discussing the status of hog raising in the southern United States. Topics discussed include sows, corn feeds, supplements to corn in feeds, and different breeds of swine.
Feeding Hogs in the South
Report discussing the status of hog raising in the southern United States. Topics discussed include sows, corn feeds, and supplements to corn in feeds.
Handling and Loading Southern New Potatoes
This bulletin discusses methods for handling, loading, and transporting southern new potatoes in the United States. It explains the importance of grading potatoes, removing bruised and diseased potatoes from the crop before transport, and loading cars properly. Potatoes may be loaded into cars in barrels, sacks, and crates, but hampers should not be used.
Handling and Loading Southern New Potatoes
Revised edition. This bulletin discusses methods for handling, loading, and transporting southern new potatoes in the United States. It explains the importance of grading potatoes, removing bruised and diseased potatoes from the crop before transport, and loading cars properly. Potatoes may be loaded into cars in barrels, sacks, and crates, but hampers should not be used.
Dodder
Report discussing the weed commonly known as dodder or love vine and methods for controlling it. If procedures are properly followed, eradication of the weed in the United States is possible. Topics include varieties of dodder and plants that susceptible to attack by it, its life cycle, and ways it is unintentionally introduced to farms.
Eradication of Bermuda Grass
This bulletin describes Bermuda grass, a plant that is both highly valuable to pastures and also invasive in the southern United States, and gives suggestions for its control. Possible methods for eradication include the strategic use of shade, winterkilling, fallowing, hog grazing, and tilling practices.
The Nichols Terrace: An Improved Channel-Type Terrace for the Southeast
This bulletin describes how farmers can build a Nichols terrace, which is an improved channel-type terrace. Maintenance suggestions are also provided.
The Southern Pine Beetle: A Menace to the Pine Timber of the Southern States
Report discussing the destructive effects of the Southern pine beetle on pine forests in the southern United States. To prevent spread of the disease, infested trees should be located between November and March and destroyed. Methods for locating infested trees and destroying them are explained in detail.
The Mexican Bean Beetle in the East
Report discussing the Mexican bean beetle, which is the most serious insect enemy of beans in parts of the United States. Although it has long been present in the southwestern United States, it has recently spread to the Southeast and destroyed much of the bean crop there. This bulletin describes the beetle's life cycle and different control measures, including spraying and dusting with insecticides.
Wheat Scab and Its Control
This bulletin discusses wheat scab, a fungal disease of wheat, rye, barley, and oats that is caused by a parasite. It describes the appearance of afflicted crops as well as the parasite's life cycle and proposes a variety of control measures.
Demonstration Work on Southern Farms
Report discussing the origination and purpose of the Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work. The agency is primarily tasked with developing methods to control the spread of the Mexican cotton boll weevil, but it researches cultivation techniques for other crops as well, particularly corn and cowpea. This report summarizes the agency's preliminary findings.
Demonstration Work in Cooperation with Southern Farmers
Report discussing the efforts of the Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work, which consists of "(1) the demonstration of improved methods of agriculture in the weevil-infected districts [...] and (2) the extension of the same principles to other Southern States beyond the range of weevil infestation." (p. 6) Congress created the organization in 1904 to assist with relief efforts.
The Culture of Winter Wheat in the Eastern United States
Report discussing best practices for growing winter wheat in the eastern United States. Topics discussed include soils adapted to wheat cultivation, fertilizers, seed selection and preparation, and crop rotation.
The Culture of Winter Wheat in the Eastern United States
Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for growing winter wheat in the eastern United States. Topics discussed include soils adapted to wheat cultivation, fertilizers, seed selection and preparation, and crop rotation.
The Southern Corn Rootworm and Farm Practices to Control It
"Of all corn pests in the South one of the most serious is the larva, or young, of the 12-spotted cucumber beetle -- the so-called southern corn rootworm. True to its name, it feeds on the roots, but in young corn it also drills a small hole in the stem just above the first circle of roots, boring out the crown and killing the bud.... Progressive farming methods, as described in this bulletin, will reduce the ravages of this insect. Burn over waste places to destroy dead grass, weeds, and rubbish in which the beetles winter. If possible, avoid planting corn in fields which contained corn the year before. Enrich the soil by planting legumes so that the corn will have a better chance of recovering from rootworm injury. Protect the bobwhite. This bird destroys many beetles of the rootworm. By careful observations, extending over a period of years, find out the dates between which the rooworm does the most damage; then time your planting so that it will fall either before or after these dates, taking into consideration, of course, other important factors in crop production." -- p. 2
The Corn Earworm As an Enemy of Vetch
"Vetch, which has become an important forage crop throughout the Southeastern States, needs protection from the same insect that works such havoc on corn and cotton. This corn earworm, or cotton bollworm, is the most serious pest that growers of vetch have to combat. The caterpillars eat both the foliage and the seed pods, and, if the infestation is heavy, make the crop practically worthless. Vetch intended for a hay crop generally escapes serious injury, as it is cut before the caterpillars are large enough to do much damage. It is recommended that a crop intended for seed be carefully watched and if the insects become numerous an insecticide be applied at once or the vetch cut for hay. Spraying, dusting, the use of poisoned-bran bait, and other control measures are discussed and summarized in this bulletin." -- p. 2
How to Attract Birds in the Middle Atlantic States
"For economic as well as for aesthetic reasons an effort should be made to attract and protect birds and to increase their numbers. Where proper measures of this kind have been taken an increase of several fold in the bird population has resulted, with decreased losses from depredations of injurious insects. This bulletin is one of a series intended to describe the best methods of attracting birds in various parts of the United States, especially by providing a food supply and other accessories about the homestead." -- p. 2. This particular bulletin focuses on birds in the Middle Atlantic states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, West Virginia, Virginia, and North Carolina.
The Red Spider on Cotton and How to Control It
This report discusses the red spider, an insect which destroys cotton plants, and measures for controlling it. Topics discussed include its breeding patterns, life cycle, and natural enemies.
The Control of the Chestnut Bark Disease
Report discussing the spread of the chestnut bark disease, including its causes, symptoms, modes of transmission, financial consequences, and the possible methods of controlling it.
Farm Practice with Lespedeza
"The use of lespedeza as a farm crop has rapidly increased during the past few years. The increase in the use of lespedeza is due partly to the excellent results that have been obtained by the farmers who have been growing the Common variety, for hay and for pasture and soil improvement, but more particularly to the introduction of some new varieties that produce better yields, are adapted to a wider range of climatic conditions, and are generally better suited to the needs of the average farm than is the Common variety. This bulletin is based on information collected from farmers located in the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Kentucky who are growing lespedeza regularly as a farm crop. The information includes methods of seeding, varieties used, the place in the cropping system usually occupied by lespedeza, and practices that have developed in connection with the production and use of the crop in these States." -- p. 1
A Simple Way to Increase Crop Yields: Methods Followed by Farmers of the Coastal Plain Section of the Central Atlantic States in Building Up Soil Fertility
"The soils of the coastal plain section of the Central Atlantic States, as a rule, are light in character, have been farmed for generations, and need first of all a liberal supply of organic matter. This need should be met by growing such legumes as crimson clover, cowpeas, soy beans, red clover, and hairy vetch. Rye, buckwheat, and the grasses are also valuable in this connection. Commercial fertilizer and lime should be used freely when necessary to stimulate the growth of these soil-improving crops. By arranging the cropping system to include one or more legumes that supply the land with nitrogen and humus, crop yields have been greatly increased on many farms scattered throughout this region. The systems followed on a few of the more successful of these farms are described in detail in the following pages." -- p. 2
The Tobacco Budworm and Its Control in the Southern Tobacco Districts
This report discusses the tobacco budworm, a destructive insect prominent in the southern United States, and measures for its control, including poisons. Topics discussed include the insect's life cycle, diet, and enemies.
Arsenate of Lead as an Insecticide Against the Tobacco Hornworms in the Dark-Tobacco District
Report discussing the use of lead arsenate (diplumbie) as a safe and effective insecticide for tobacco farms in the southern United States. Includes instructions for applying the insecticide.
Cowpeas
"The cowpea is the most valuable legume for the Southern States and its use would be much more extensive were it not for the relatively high price of the seed, most of which is still picked by hand. Particular attention is therefore given to the matter of harvesting seed by machinery now in very successful use in several communities. These methods are so far perfected that the cowpea seed crop should receive much greater attention in favorable localities." -- p. 5. This bulletin also discusses the use of cowpeas for hay, seed mixtures of cowpeas and other crops, the nutritional value of cowpeas in animal feeds, growing practices, and the several different varieties of cowpea.