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Harmful and Beneficial Mammals of the Arid Interior, With Special Reference to the Carson and Humboldt Valleys, Nevada
"Large tracts of arid desert are now being reclaimed and converted into arable land, rich in agricultural possibilities. Crops, trees, live stock, poultry, and ditch banks in this reclaimed territory suffer from the depredations of certain mammals, and the farmers, many of whom are from remote localities, are not always able to discriminate between friends and foes; nor are they always acquainted with cheap and effective methods of destroying the noxious kinds. The report comprises a brief account of the commoner mammals of the region, with special reference to their economic status and the best means of destroying the noxious species, and has been prepared as a practical aid to the ranchmen of the arid interior." -- p. 2. Among the animal discussed are squirrels, chipmunks, various types of mice, muskrats, rats, gophers, rabbits, bobcats, desert foxes, coyotes, skunks, badgers, weasels, minks, otters, and bats.
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
"This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Because strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove helpful to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Strawberry Culture: Western United States
Revised edition. "Strawberries can be grown in those parts of the western Untied States in which ordinary farm crops are irrigated as well as in western Oregon and Washington, where irrigation is not essential but may be profitable. The principles of irrigating strawberries are essentially the same as those for other crops. Because strawberries are sensitive to the alkali salts that irrigation brings to the surface, such salts must be washed out or skimmed off. The strawberry grower, after choosing a suitable site and preparing the soil carefully, should select varieties adapted to his district and needs. He should use plants that are disease-free. In California, southern Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas the plants should have undergone a rest period. Usually the growers plant during the period of greatest rainfall. By using the recommended systems of training and care before, during, and after setting of the plants and the suggested methods of decreasing diseases and insect pests, he should obtain better yields. A grower can furnish consumers a better product by using good methods of harvesting and shipment. He can prolong the fresh-fruit season only a little by the use of cold storage, but he can extend his market by growing varieties suitable for preserving, canning, and freezing." -- p. ii
Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States
"The information given in this bulletin should enable farmers in the Great Plains and Western States to select from the more common species of grasses some one or more suited to their needs [for soil and water conservation]. Common harvesting equipment and farm machinery can be adapted to the proper handling of native grasses. This brings the cost of such work within the means of most farmers." -- p. i. Among the grasses discussed are wheatgrass, buffalo grass, bluestem, grama, Bermuda grass, wild rye, hilaria, Sudan grass, bluegrass, panic grasses, dropseed, and needlegrass.
How to Attract Birds in Northwestern United States
This report discusses steps that can be taken by residents of the northwestern United States to attract birds to their homes and farms. Needs for protections from natural enemies, breeding places, and food and water are each discussed
Purple Vetch
This bulletin discusses purple vetch, a plant used for hay, manure, and pasturage that grows readily along the Pacific and Gulf Coasts of the United States.
The Nevada Mouse Plague of 1907-08
Report discussing the history of the mouse plague in Nevada from 1907-1908, its causes, effects, and lessons for combating future plagues. Special attention is given to the importance of protecting hawks, owls, and other small predatory mammals which can help prevent future occurrences.
Soil Defense in the Pacific Southwest
"The Pacific Southwest, as considered in this bulletin, embraces the two States -- California and Nevada. Evidences of soil and water losses are briefly touched upon, as are the factors contributing to these losses. The bulk of the bulletin deals with measures of defense that are now being employed on farms and range land within project areas of the Soil Conservation Service and in areas where members of Civilian Conservation Corps camps have been assigned to erosion-control activities." -- p. i. Some of the measures discussed include the use of cover crops, contour farming, crop rotation, subsoiling, strip cropping, and terracing.
Reseeding Range Lands of the Intermountain Region
"Revegetating deteriorated range lands by sowing adaptable, nutritious, and palatable grasses is vital for adequate forage production in the Intermountain region, for profitable livestock raising, and as a safeguard against flood and erosion damage. The effect of serious droughts, greatly aggravated by overstocking, has resulted in the replacement of valuable perennial grasses by annual weeds and grasses that have much less value as forage for livestock or for proper soil protection. The abandonment of unsuccessful submarginal croplands has also added greatly to the vast acreage of deteriorated but potentially productive range lands of the region in need of revegetation. Proper guides and procedure for revegetating run-down ranges and abandoned dry farms by artificial reseeding are necessary to safeguard against costly pitfalls and to insure reasonable success. The procedures herein outlined are based on the experiences and research to date and should prove helpful to those administering range lands and producing livestock in the region comprising Utah, Nevada, southern Idaho, and southwestern Wyoming, commonly referred to as the Intermountain region." -- p. i
The Sugar-Beet Nematode in the Western States
"The sugar-beet nematode is one of the most serious of the beet pests. It appears to have been imported with some shipments of beet seed many years ago. It has been found widely scattered in four of the western sugar-beet States and probably exists in other States where beets have been grown for several years. The sugar-beet nematode is the cause of a great deal of loss to the beet grower through reduction of his tonnage, and of a corresponding amount of loss to the sugar producer through reduction of the output of sugar. This bulletin treats of the nature and distribution of the sugar-beet nematode, indicates the most probable means by which this pest is spread, and suggests preventive measures and practical means of control." -- p. 2
Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 53
Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Inoculation and Lime for Alfalfa, Citrus Culture in Southern Texas, Pruning Rotundifolia Grapes, Native Hays or Arid Region, Bermuda Grass, Short v. Long Feeding of Beef Cattle, Contagious Abortion of Cattle, Preventing Losses at Lambing time, Winter Lambs for the Pacific Coast Market, Feeding Work Horses, Colony Houses for Poultry, Food of the Crow Blackbird, and Flour for Baking Powder Biscuits.