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Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture
This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture
Revised edition. This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
The Bollworm or Corn Earworm
"Cotton bollworm, corn earworm, tomato fruitworm, and false budworm of tobacco are common names applied to one and the same insect when it is found attacking these various crops. In fact the insect is a very general feeder, attacking many wild plants as well as garden vegetables, alfalfa, cowpeas, and the crops indicated above. The bollworm, or corn earworm as it is most widely known, occurs as a pest in practically all parts of the United States." -- p. 3. This bulletin discusses the life cycle of the insect, its distribution, and measures for its control.
Building Up a Run-Down Cotton Plantation
"This paper is an account of the progress made in three years in changing a run-down cotton plantation into a profitable stock and hay farm. The results obtained from the use of cowpeas and other leguminous crops in restoring the fertility of the land have exceeded the expectations of those in charge of the work." -- p. 5
The Roundheaded Apple-Tree Borer
This report discusses the roundheaded apple-tree borer, an insect in the eastern and midwestern United States that, in its larval stage, destroys the bark and wood of apple trees. Several methods of control are discussed, including worming, paints and washes, and sprays.Apple-tree borers.
Prairie Rice Culture in the United States
Report discussing the cultivation of rice on the Gulf coastal plain, primarily in Louisiana, Texas, and Arkansas. Contains sections on varieties, irrigation, seeding, drainage, and harvesting.
An Example of Intensive Farming in the Cotton Belt
"This paper is descriptive of the improvement of an area of poor land by growing ordinary field crops under a system of farm management which aims at the incorporation of liberal amounts of organic matter in the soil as the chief factor in maintaining fertility and increased crop yields -- a practice which can not be too frequently brought to the attention of farmers. This system has produced greater returns to the farmer who practices it than any other system in use in his locality and will serve as an object lesson to many small farmers in all parts of the country." -- p. 2
A Successful Alabama Diversification Farm
"In this bulletin is given the record of a 65-acre hog farm in the black prairie region of Alabama. The method of farming described is applicable to the entire area in which corn, alfalfa, and Bermuda grass can be grown. This area includes the black lands of Texas, the river bottoms of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, and the alluvial soils generally in all the Southern States.... The primary object in the work of this farm was to demonstrate that hog farming is practicable in this territory, and three years' experience has led us to the conclusion that the production of alfalfa hay in this region can also be made highly profitable.... The system of farming established on the diversification farm at Uniontown, Alabama, was planned with the special view of increasing the fertility of the soil and reducing the cost of tillage by doing away with hillside ditches and adopting improved methods of cultivation." -- p. 5
Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions
Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions
Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions
Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions
Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions
Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions
Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions
Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions
Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Muscadine Grapes
Revised edition. "Muscadine grapes, which are native to the southeastern part of the United States, thrive in most soils of that region. They can be grown successfully in the Southeastern States, where American bunch grapes do not thrive. furthermore, they are suitable for home gardens as well as for commercial use. In fact they are perhaps the most satisfactory of all fruits for the home garden in this region. They cannot be grown, hoever, where temperatures as low as 0 °F occur habitually and may be injured at somewhat higher temperatures. Muscadine grapes are relatively uninjured by diseases and insects and produce well with a minimum of care, but they resopnd favorably to the good cultural practices recommended in this bulletin. The varieties described or listed produce fruit suitable for making unfermented juice, wine, jelly, and other culinary products and for eating fresh over a long season." -- p. ii
Marketing Live Stock in the South: Suggestions for Improvement
"The purpose of this bulletin is to place before southern farmers [in the United States] who produce stock in small lots and who are experiencing difficulty in marketing their livestock the more important local marketing plans which have been found successful in certain communities and which are practicable under southern conditions." -- p. 3. Topics include cooperative livestock shipping, marketing clubs and associations, and market demands.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication
Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed and instructions for constructing a concrete vat are given.
Feeding Hogs in the South
Report discussing the status of hog raising in the southern United States. Topics discussed include sows, corn feeds, supplements to corn in feeds, and different breeds of swine.
Feeding Hogs in the South
Report discussing the status of hog raising in the southern United States. Topics discussed include sows, corn feeds, and supplements to corn in feeds.
Handling and Loading Southern New Potatoes
This bulletin discusses methods for handling, loading, and transporting southern new potatoes in the United States. It explains the importance of grading potatoes, removing bruised and diseased potatoes from the crop before transport, and loading cars properly. Potatoes may be loaded into cars in barrels, sacks, and crates, but hampers should not be used.
Handling and Loading Southern New Potatoes
Revised edition. This bulletin discusses methods for handling, loading, and transporting southern new potatoes in the United States. It explains the importance of grading potatoes, removing bruised and diseased potatoes from the crop before transport, and loading cars properly. Potatoes may be loaded into cars in barrels, sacks, and crates, but hampers should not be used.
Eradication of Bermuda Grass
This bulletin describes Bermuda grass, a plant that is both highly valuable to pastures and also invasive in the southern United States, and gives suggestions for its control. Possible methods for eradication include the strategic use of shade, winterkilling, fallowing, hog grazing, and tilling practices.
Irrigation Practice in Rice Growing
This report discusses the practice of growing rice in irrigated fields in the southern United States and details the irrigation process, including the building of canals, wells, pumps, and levees.
The Southern Pine Beetle: A Menace to the Pine Timber of the Southern States
Report discussing the destructive effects of the Southern pine beetle on pine forests in the southern United States. To prevent spread of the disease, infested trees should be located between November and March and destroyed. Methods for locating infested trees and destroying them are explained in detail.
Demonstration Work on Southern Farms
Report discussing the origination and purpose of the Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work. The agency is primarily tasked with developing methods to control the spread of the Mexican cotton boll weevil, but it researches cultivation techniques for other crops as well, particularly corn and cowpea. This report summarizes the agency's preliminary findings.
Demonstration Work in Cooperation with Southern Farmers
Report discussing the efforts of the Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work, which consists of "(1) the demonstration of improved methods of agriculture in the weevil-infected districts [...] and (2) the extension of the same principles to other Southern States beyond the range of weevil infestation." (p. 6) Congress created the organization in 1904 to assist with relief efforts.
The Culture of Winter Wheat in the Eastern United States
Report discussing best practices for growing winter wheat in the eastern United States. Topics discussed include soils adapted to wheat cultivation, fertilizers, seed selection and preparation, and crop rotation.
The Culture of Winter Wheat in the Eastern United States
Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for growing winter wheat in the eastern United States. Topics discussed include soils adapted to wheat cultivation, fertilizers, seed selection and preparation, and crop rotation.
Rye Growing in the Southeastern States
"Rye should be grown much more widely than at present in many parts of the Southeastern Stats. In any consideration of the expansion of the acreage of bread grain and in any encouragement given for the production of home-grown bread in this section it is necessary to consider wheat and rye together. This is because rye can be sown safely on many fields with less risk than wheat. Further, rye can be used as a substitute for wheat as a bread grain by those who are accustomed to it. Rye succeeds on poorer and sandier soils and with less fertilizer than wheat. For these reasons it should be sown in preference to wheat where it has been proved a safer crop. Rye is also the best grain in most of this section for use as a cover, green manure, and grazing dcrop. Home-grown seed is best. Northern-grown rye is not suitable for sowing in the South." -- p. 2
The Red Spider on Cotton and How to Control It
This report discusses the red spider, an insect which destroys cotton plants, and measures for controlling it. Topics discussed include its breeding patterns, life cycle, and natural enemies.
Horse Beans
This bulletin discuss the horse bean (or fava bean), which is a legume cultivated widely in many nations and holds great potential as a crop along the Pacific and Gulf Coasts of the United States.
Crop Systems for Arkansas
"Crop systems for Arkansas that make for increased food production and increased efficiency in man labor and horse labor are described in the following pages. By the introduction of cowpeas, soybeans, and other legumes, and by second cropping, provision is made for a considerable increase in the number of crop acres that can be farmed by the average family.... In each of the cropping systems suggested the crop acreages are calculated for two men and a team, and for light, medium, and heavy soils. These systems in general apply to all of Arkansas, except the northwestern part, and some of them may be used to advantage in northern Louisiana, northeastern Texas, southeastern Oklahoma, western Tennessee, and the northern half of Mississippi." -- p. 2
Texas or Tick Fever and Its Prevention
Report discussing the disease tick fever (also known as Texas fever) and its destructive effects on cattle. Topics discussed include the life cycle of the tick which transmits the disease, symptoms of the disease, and methods of treatment and prevention.
Cowpeas: Culture and Varieties
Report discussing the cowpea, a leguminous crop often grown in the Southern United States. Topics discussed include its several varieties, fertilizers, methods of sowing, and diseases.
Beekeeping in the Tulip-Tree Region
"Many thousand colonies of bees occur in the region where the tulip-tree is abundant but the honey crop from tulip-tree flowers inconsiderable. Too few beekeepers in this region have modern equipment, it is true, but the greatest loss comes from the fact that they do not care for their bees so as to have them ready to gather the abundant nectar from this early-blooming tree. In this bulletin a methods is given for the management of the apiary so that the full honey crop from this source may be obtained." -- p. 2
The Rough-Headed Corn Stalk-Beetle in the Southern States and Its Control
"Within recent years an increasing number of reports of serious damage to the corn crop by a robust black beetle have been received from most of the Southern States. A noteworthy outbreak occurred during the early summer of 1914 in the tidewater section of Virginia. As very little was known regarding the natural history of this pest, this bulletin has been designed to supply this information. By following the control measures recommended herein it is hoped that the ravages of this pest may be largely overcome in the future." -- p. 3
Spraying for Apple Diseases and the Codling Moth in the Ozarks
Report promoting the spraying of apples with insecticides and fungicides in the Ozarks in order to prevent damage from bitter-rot, apple blotch, leaf-spot diseases, apple scab, and the codling moth. Each problem is described and a course of treatment by spraying is recommended.
The Cotton Bollworm: Some Observations and Results of Field Experiments in 1904
Report discussing the cotton bollworm, which is very destructive to the cotton plant, especially in the Southwestern states in the Cotton Belt of the United States. Contains reports on fieldwork conducted at two stations in Texas and a discussion of effective and ineffective methods of control.
Soil Defense in the South
"This bulletin describes farming practices that conserve soil, and how such practices may be applied to farms in a large part of the South. Its scope is limited to that part of the Cotton Belt extending west from the Georgia-Alabama line to central Texas and southern Oklahoma." -- p. i.
Soy Beans in Systems of Farming in the Cotton Belt
This bulletin discusses ways that soybeans may be used in systems of farming in the Cotton Belt of the United States. Soybeans are a legume that may be used as a fertilizer, livestock feed, oil, or human food.
Strawberry Growing in the South
This report discusses strawberry cultivation in the southern United States, especially with regard to field location, soil and climate requirements, fertilizers, harvesting, varieties, and strawberry by-products
Muscadine Grapes: A Fruit for the South
This bulletin discusses the cultivation of muscadine grapes in the southern United States. Topics discussed include propagation, pruning and training, soil management, fertilizers, harvesting, common diseases, and varieties.
Muscadine Grapes: A Fruit for the South
Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cultivation of muscadine grapes in the southern United States. Topics discussed include propagation, pruning and training, soil management, fertilizers, harvesting, common diseases, and varieties.