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Investigation of Graphite Bodies : Progress Report No. 3 for the Period March 1, 1959 to May 31, 1959
This document is the third in a series of progress report that records investigations of graphite bodies. Along with the report, two appendices are given to describe the different graphite bodies: "Synthetic Binders for Carbon and Graphite" and "High Temperature Physical Properties of Molded Graphites".
Modified-Graphite Technology : Quarterly Report No. 1
From abstract: "This report summarizes the past year of study of fine, molded, multicrystalline graphites with particular reference to the interrelation among certain properties with the composition, fabricating techniques, and thermal treatments found to influence them."
An Improved Nuclear Density Gauge : Covering the Interval of July 1 to August 1, 1959
The following document is a note describing the building process of an improved nuclear density gauge in comparison to previous gauges, within the interval of July 1 to August 1, 1959.
Magnetic Recorder for Nuclear Pulse Application : Covering the Period from August 6, 1959 to October 5, 1959
The following report discusses direct recording of nuclear pulse height data on magnetic tape that represents an inexpensive method of data storage where some degradation of the original energy resolution can be tolerated.
Magnetic Recorder for Nuclear Pulse Application : Covering the Period from December 6, 1959 to February 5, 1960
"Abstract: An evaluation of a modulator flux sensitive playback head to be used with an analog magnetic recorder for nuclear pulse information storage was made. The modulator head was found unsultable. A pulse stretching unit was constructed which takes pulses from a standard linear pulse amplifier and provides an output signal suitable for driving a recording head."
Magnetic Recorder for Nuclear Pulse Application : Covering the Period from February 6, 1960 to April 5, 1960
Abstract: "The accuracies which can be achieved in analog recording systems are for the most part tape limited. While reasonable variations in tape speed do not directly affect the accuracy, such variations result in improper tape tensioning, which in turn results in poor head-to-tape contact. The quality of the tape transport mechanism should be such that the error introduced by improper head- to tape contact is less than tape errors. Some additional equipment is necessary in setting up a tape recorder for a given experiment. The amplitude of the input pulse spectura to the recorder should be adjusted for optimum value and, if possible, the counting rate should be adjusted to obtain good tape utilization. An oscilloscope is probably adequate to satisfy both conditions."
Magnetic Recorder for Nuclear Pulse Application : Covering the Period from June 5, 1959 to August 5, 1959
"Abstract: The advantages of storing nuclear pulse height information on tape for later use with an analyzer are pointed out. Experiments with a magnetic modulator playback head which would offset inaccuracies due to tape speed variation are described. (T.R.H.)."
Magnetic Recorder for Nuclear Pulse Application : Covering the Period from October 6, 1959 to December 5, 1959
"Abstract: Data on analog magnetic tape characteristics are presented along with results from conventional and modulator playback system operational tests. Theoretical considerations imply that the modulator head should be loss sensitive to short term variations in record and playback tape speed. It is also pointed out that although a tape recorder operating at 7.5 in./sec has only 12 kcs bandwidth for sinusoidal wave forms. the record and play-back amplifiers for pulse recording can operate with other bandwidths. These amplifiers must be capable of passing a square wave with a frequency of 1.5 kcs. A square wave of such frequency represents the condition of 350 microsecond pulses with a 700 microsecond period. (J.R.D)."
Feasibility Study of a New Mass Flow System : Quarterly Report No. 1 Covering the Period From June 1 to September 1, 1960
The following report describes a mass flow system that can measure homogeneous flow, slurries, highly corrosive fluids and multiphase fluids, with the addition of considering pressure drops, measuring external to the flow, ruggedness and reliability.
An Improved Nuclear Density Gauge : Covering the Interval from October 2 to November 1, 1959
The following document is a note describing the process of building a nuclear density gauge and its improved features in comparison to previously reported density gauges.
An Improved Nuclear Density Gauge : Covering the Interval from September 2 to October 1, 1959
The following document is an updated note on the process of building an improved nuclear density gauge within the time interval of September 2 to October 1, 1959.
An Improved Nuclear Density Gauge : Covering the Interval of June 1 to July 1, 1959
The following document is a note describing the building process of an improved nuclear density gauge in comparison to previous gauges, within the interval of June 1 to July 1, 1959.
An Improved Nuclear Density Gauge : Quarterly Report No. 1 Covering the Period from June 1 to September 1, 1959
This report discusses the concept of an improved mass gauging technique with a scintillation counter as the radiation detector in order to meet industrial requirements.
An Improved Nuclear Density Gauge : Quarterly Report No. 2 Covering the Period from September 1 to December 1, 1959
This report is the second in a series of quarterly reports on the discussion and progression of an improved nuclear density gauge, covering techniques measuring detector sensitivity to result in improved stability.
An Improved Nuclear Measuring Principle : Quarterly Progress Report No. 3 Covering the Period from December 1, 1959 to March 1, 1960
This report is the third in a series of quarterly reports discussing the concept and progression of an improved method in nuclear measuring than the usage of the scintillation counter. This report indicates that in a chopped double beam system, commutation of the detector current permits selection of optimum response time and size of radioactive sources.
Feasibility Study of a New Mass Flow System : Covering the Period from January 1 to January 31, 1961
This document reports progress during the month of February, 1961, recording investigations and studies of a flow rate using a curved pipe or S-tube and documenting measurements of mass flow, tube design and construction.
Feasibility Study of a New Mass Flow System : Quarterly Report No. 2 Covering the Period from September 1 to November 30, 1960
This is the second quarterly report that documents a system of mass flow that can record measurements of homogeneous flow, slurries, highly corrosive fluids and multiphase fluids, additionally considering pressure drops, measuring external to the flow, ruggedness and reliability.
Feasibility Study of a New Mass Flow System : Quarterly Report No. 3 Covering the Period from December 1, 1960 to February 28, 1961
This is the third quarterly report that documents a system of mass flow that can record measurements of homogeneous flow, slurries, highly corrosive fluids and multiphase fluids, additionally considering pressure drops, measuring external to the flow, ruggedness and reliability.
High-Temperatuer Creep Evaluation in Carbon Dioxide Atmosphere : Summary Report, October 1, 1959 to March 31, 1961
This report follows an investigation made to determine creep-rupture data for three sheet materials. Fourteen of sixteen tests were made in an atmosphere of carbon dioxide within hermetically sealed capsules, analyzing the reaction of the three sheet metals: 347 stainless steel, iron-aluminum-chromium alloy designated 261C, and a zirconium-base alloy, AE1H. Minimum creep rate, per cent elongation, and rupture life were determined and reported.
The Boron-Carbon System: Final Technical Report, May 1, 1960 - April 30, 1961
Abstract: The boron-carbon equilibrium diagram has been determined by X-ray, metallographic, and thermal analysis of sintered and arc-cast alloys. A single carbide having a range of solubility from approximately 9 to 20 a/o carbon and melting congruently exists in the system. The terminal solubility of carbon in boron is 0.1-0.2a/o. The freezing reaction at the composition and melting temperature of elemental boron; there is a eutectic reaction at 29a/o carbon and 2375 degrees Celcius. No allotropy of boron was observed.
The Boron-Carbon System: Quarterly Report No. 3, November 1, 1960 - January 31, 1961
Abstract: A definitive investigation of the boron-carbon equilibrium system is being made by X-ray diffraction, metallographic, and thermal analytical techniques. On the basis of metallographic and X-ray diffraction studies it is concluded that boron carbide has a range of solubility from approximately 10 to 20 atomic per cent carbon at 1500 degrees to 2000 degrees Celsius. The melting point of the carbide-graphite eutectic has been established as 2325-2350 degrees Celsius. No reversible allotropy of the beta-rhombohedral structure has been observed. The solubility of carbon in boron is very small. The melting point of dilute carbon alloys is found to be essentially the same as that of pure boron (2040 degrees to 2050 degrees). No metallographic evidence of a three-phase reaction of dilute alloys is observed.
Niobium Phase Diagrams : Manuscript Report on Niobium-Carbon System
Abstract: "The niobium-carbon system has been determined by X-ray and metallographic examination of sintered and arc-cast alloys. Two carbides exist: hexagonal Nb2C with a limited range of homogeneity, and cubic NbC with a solubility range from 8.25 to 10.25 weight per cent carbon. Dilute alloys freeze by eutectic reaction at 2230 C. The solubility of carbon in niobium is 0.80 at the eutectic temperature, but this decreases rapidly with temperature. Metallographic evidence indicates a peritectic reaction between melt, Nb2C, and NbC; alloys richer in carbon than NbC freeze by eutectic reaction."
Niobium Phase Diagrams : Manuscript Report on Niobium-Oxygen System
Abstract: "The niobium-oxygen equilibrium has been determined by metallographic examination of arc-cast alloys made of electron-gun-refined niobium metal and special purity niobium pentoxide. Two intermediate oxides, NbO and NbO2, melt without decomposition at 1945 C and 1915 C, respectively. Eutectic reactions exist between niobium and NbO and 1915 C and between NbO and NbO2 at 1810 C. Experimental supports a peritectic reaction between NbO2 and Nb2O5 1510 C. The maximum solid solubility of oxygen in niobium metal is 0.72 weight per cent."
Niobium Phase Diagrams
The following report is the final technical report on a series of reports under contract AT(11-1)-515, titled "Niobium Phase Diagrams", covering the period from April 15, 1957 to April 16, 1960.
The Boron-Carbon System: Quarterly Report No. 1, May 1, 1960 - June 31, 1960
Abstract: A definitive investigation of the boron-carbon equilibrium system is being made by X-ray diffraction, metallographic, and thermal analytical techniques. Alloys are being produced by sintering pressed powder aggregates with subsequent arc melting. Alloys have been made at two atomic percent intervals up to thirty atomic per cent carbon. In the future, higher carbon compositions are to be investigated. Techniques have been worked out for the metallographic preparation of the extremely hard and friable alloys.
The Boron-Carbon System: Quarterly Report No. 2, August 1, 1960 - October 31, 1960
Abstract: A definitive investigation of the boron-carbon equilibrium system is being made by X-ray diffraction, metallographic, and thermal analytical techniques. Additional baron-carbon alloys have been prepared by sintering and arc-melting compacts prepared from boron and high-purity graphite. Metallographic examinations of these alloys are in agreement with alloys previously preapred from lampblack. X-ray investigation of sintered compacts indicates that the solubility range of boron carbide extends almost to pure boron. Boron of various purities has been annealed for times up to four hours, but no structure other than beta-rhombohedral has been detected. Very high purity boron (10 ppm impurity) has been obtained for the study of allotropy and the equilibrium relationships at very dilute carbon contents.
Study of the capability of isotopic source of secondary radiation : covering the period from June 1, 1962 to August 31, 1962
A report intending to determine optimum beta-excited x-ray source designs which will demonstrate practical uses of the isotopic sources for medical and dental radiography, inspection of missile and airplane structures, and other nondestructive testing problems.
Studies of nuclear resonant absorption of gamma rays : covering the period from June 1, 1961 to August 31, 1961
A report which determines the effect of polarizing magnetic field intensities on the fraction of nuclear resonant absorption using a simple electromagnet.
Studies of nuclear resonant absorption of gamma rays : covering the period from September 1 to November 30, 1961
A report about the absorption of gamma rays. Absorption measurements were made using pressures up to 40,000 psi, but no measurable changes were found over this range. Experiments were carried out to determine whether there was any change in the fraction of recoil free emissions of gamma rays.
Radiation Synthesis Involving Halogenated Compounds : Progress Report No. 2 Covering the Period From August 1, 1960 to October 31, 1960
Report covering progress regarding a study on radiation synthesis involving halogenated compounds. Experimental progress, results and discussion are included.
Scintillation spectrometer measurements of capture gamma rays from natural elements : sixth quarterly report covering the period November 1, 1962 to January 31, 1963
This report discusses many low energy neutron capture gamma ray spectra from many elements. Also, a series of neutron capture gamma ray spectra from a wide variety of meteorite and terrestrial rock samples were obtained.
Scintillation Spectrometer Measurements of Capture Gamma Rays From Natural Elements: First Quarterly Report
From abstract: "The objective of this program is to make a compilation of neutron capture gamma ray spectra of the naturally occurring elements, covering both the low and high energy region, using Na I(TI) scintillation detectors...During this phase of the program a detection system, together with its associated shielding was constructed and tested."
Scintillation spectrometer measurements of capture gamma rays from natural elements : fourth quarterly report covering the period March 15, 1962 to June 14, 1962
A report about obtaining low energy neutron capture gamma-ray spectra of a suitable quality for inclusion in the Atlas. It analyzes several low energy spectra obtained from many sources.
Scintillation spectrometer measurements of capture gamma rays from natural elements : second quarterly report covering the period September 15, 1961 to December 14, 1961
A report which intends to make a compilation of neutron capture gamma ray spectra of naturally occurring elements, covering both the low and the high energy spectral region, using NaI(TI) scintillation detectors.
Scintillation spectrometer measurements of capture gamma rays from natural elements : third quarterly report covering the period December 15, 1961 to March 14, 1962
A report which describes the how the low energy neutron capture gamma ray spectra has been obtained for inclusion in the atlas along with many ores. In addition to gaining this spectra, tests were conducted with the 5'' by 4'' NaI(TI) crystal in the present detector system.
Scintillation spectrometer measurements of capture gamma rays from natural elements : seventh quarterly report covering the period February 1, 1963 to April 30, 1963
A report focused on obtaining further neutron capture gamma ray spectra for inclusion in the Atlas, and in conducting subsidiary experiments to determine the cause of the anomalous broad peak structure which was reported in ARF 1193-20.
Feasibility Study of a New Mass Flow System : Quarterly Report No. 5 Covering the Period from June 1, 1961 to August 31, 1961
This is the fifth quarterly report that documents a system of mass flow that can record measurements of homogeneous flow, slurries, highly corrosive fluids and multiphase fluids, additionally considering pressure drops, measuring external to the flow, ruggedness and reliability.
Literature Survey on World Isotope and Radiation Technology : First Interim Report Covering the Period from June 15, 1961 to August 14, 1961
Abstract: "This is the first interim report of a literature survey investigating the uses and technology of radioscopes in the countries of the world, with particular emphasis necessarily placed on those more highly industrialized nations. Part I includes a general summary of the quantity and quality of radioisotope work being performed in these countries. Among the outstanding radioisotope applications with respect to quantity is the work of Japan in chemical research, that of USSR in metals research, and that in the USA in medical research. A detailed qualitative examination of the relatively narrow region of radioisotope applications in leak detection is also presented. Part II of this report gives a direct comparison between the progress and status of the US and the USSR in the varied uses of radio-isotopes."
Literature Survey on World Isotope and Radiation Technology : First Semi-Annual Report Covering the Period from June 15, 1961 to December 14, 1961
The following report is the first semi-annual report of a literature survey designed to investigate the uses and technology of radioisotopes in the countries of the world from 1955 to the present. This survey includes two phases: 1) involves the direct comparison of radioisotopic work in all fields in various countries as demonstrated at international conferences. 2) involves a more detailed examination and evaluation of the individual fields of interest selected previously (Phase II is also expected to comprise the bulk of the remainder of this investigation).
Literature Survey on World Isotope and Radiation Technology : Quarterly Report Covering the Period from December 15, 1961 to March 14, 1962
Abstract: "This quarterly report, ARF 1194-10, covers the work performed in the time period December 15, 1961 to March 14, 1962, on Contract No. AT(11-1)-578. In this period, Phase II, the detailed evaluation of various fields of radioisotope research, has been extended. Preliminary results on the use of radioisotopes in the industrial applications, apparatus and techniques, and metallurgy categories are presented. These preliminary studies indicate the quantity of research, growth rates, and specialized areas of interest in various countries of the world. More detailed evaluations of these categories will be presented in the final report."
Feasibility Study of a New Mass Flow System : Quarterly Report No. 4 Covering the Period from March 1, 1961 to May 31, 1961
This is the fourth quarterly report that documents a system of mass flow that can record measurements of homogeneous flow, slurries, highly corrosive fluids and multiphase fluids, additionally considering pressure drops, measuring external to the flow, ruggedness and reliability.
Development and Evaluation of High-Temperature Tungsten Alloys : Final Report, October 1, 1960 - September 30, 1960
This report summarizes investigations taken between October 1, 1959, to September 30, 1960 with the objectives of developing high-tungsten alloys which are readily fabricable into massive and complex shapes and which possess adequate strength for operation at temperatures up to 2000 F. Within this report, studies are divided into two main categories: alloy development and material fabrication techniques
Development and Evaluation of High-Temperature Tungsten Alloys : Quarterly Report No. 2, January 1, 1960 - March 31, 1960
Abstract: "Room-temperature properties were determined for W-Ni-Fe-Ru base alloys containing Cr, Mo, Pd, and Ta; highest strength levels were found in W-Ni-Fe-Ru-Mo compositions. Annealing for 250 hours at 1600 F produced a precipitate in the matrix phase and increased hardness in some of the tungsten-base alloys under study. Oxidation tests at temperatures up to 2000 F showed that additions of Al, Cr, Mo, Pd, and Ti improved the oxidation resistance of the W-Ni-Fe base. A fused coating of AMS 4775 protected a 90W-6Ni-4Fe alloy for 72 hours in air at 2100 F."
Development and Evaluation of High-Temperature Tungsten Alloys : Quarterly Report No. 3, April 1, 1960 - June 30, 1960
Abstract: "High-tungsten alloys were prepared by powder metallurgy techniques. Excellent strength and ductility at room temperature were found in the W-Ni-Mo-Ry system and in W-Ni-Fe alloys containing platinum and/or ruthenium. The effects of prolonged annealing at 1600 F on room-temperature properties were studied; W-Ni-Fe-Pt-Ru alloys were least affected by this treatment. Oxidation rates for most alloys at 2000 F were 2 to 4 times that of unalloyed tungsten; an exception was a W-Ni-Mo-Ru alloy which oxidized at 1/5 the rate of tungsten. Slip casting techniques and induction-sintering of loosely compacted powders were used to produce compacts of W-Ni-Fe materials having section thicknesses of 1 to 2 inches."
Development and Evaluation of High-Temperature Tungsten Alloys Quarterly Report: October-December 1959
Abstract: "High-tungsten alloys were prepared by powder metallurgy techniques. Room-temperature strength properties were determined for W-Ni-Fe compositions with quaternary additions of Cr, Pd, and Ru; tungsten levels ranged from 80 to 94 wt%. Small (1-3 wt%) ruthenium additions were the most effective in improving strength. The oxidation resistance of a number of tungsten-base alloys was measured at 2000F. Quaternary W-Ni-Fe base alloys containing Al, Ru, Ti, and Zr were the most oxidation resistant, having values similar to unalloyed tungsten. Oxidation protection of a 90W-6Ni-4Fe material was accomplished by a fused coating of AMS 4775; the composite was tested for 482 hours in air at 2000F without damage to the base alloy."
Development and Evaluation of High-Temperature Tungsten Alloys : Summary Report
Abstract: "Tungsten-rich alloys, developed for use at temperatures up to 2000F, exhibit ductility, fabricability and joinability not found in commercially-available materials. An envelope type of microstructure was produced in compositions containing at least 90 wt% tungsten by liquid-phase sintering of cold-pressed powders in hydrogen. At room temperature the alloys could be rolled extensively, and tensile elongations up to 25% were noted. Strength properties of a W-Ni-Fe base were improved by small quaternary additions. The ultimate tensile strength of a 90W-4.8Ni-3.2Fe-2Ru alloy was 46,700 psi at 2000F, compared to 30,000 - 35,000 psi for unalloyed tungsten or W-Ni-Fe; the 100-hour stress-rupture strength at 1600F was 15,000 psi. Excellent joints were produced by spot welding and localized induction heating. The oxidation resistance of unprotected 90 wt% tungsten compositions was not significantly affected by alloying."
Electrostatic Classification of Submicron Airborne Particles : Final Report, August 16, 1961 to January 31, 1963
From abstract: "This project was a study of electrostatic classification of submicron aerosols. Classification of particles as small as 0.006-[mu]-diameter was shown to be feasible, and good classification of atmospheric dust was achieved. However, a practical solution to the problem of overlapping between particles larger and smaller than 0.1 [mu], the point of minimum electric mobility, was not found."
Electrostatic Classification of Submicron Airborne Particles : Final Report, October 15, 1960 to August 15, 1961
From abstract: "This program was a study of the basic variables that affect electrostatic classification of heterogeneous aerosols of submicron size, especially below 0.1 [mu]."
Electrostatic Classification of Submicron Airborne Particles : Progress report, April 1 to June 1, 1962
The following report focuses on the study of electrostatic classification of submicron aerosols, with emphasis on particles below 0.1 micron. During the period this work was concerned with detailed studies of the ARF charger, the Whitby ionizer used as a charger or neutralizer, and the high-volume classifier.
Electrostatic Classification of Submicron Airborne Particles : Progress Report, April 15 to June 15, 1961
Abstract: "This program is a study of the basic variables that affect electrostatic classification of heterogeneous aerosols of submicron size,especially below 0.1[mu]. The variables of interest are particle size, concentration, composition, shape, and initial charge. During this period research was concerned with classifying particles as small as 0.01[mu]. This research included work on an aerosol generator for monodispersed 0.015-[mu] gold particles. The performance of the charger was further improved by studying its basic electrical characteristics. Tests with the electrostatic classifier showed very clearly the interference due to the stabilizer material associated with polystyrene latex suspensions. These suspensions are used to produce monodispersed aerosols for calibration."