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The Roundheaded Apple-Tree Borer
This report discusses the roundheaded apple-tree borer, an insect in the eastern and midwestern United States that, in its larval stage, destroys the bark and wood of apple trees. Several methods of control are discussed, including worming, paints and washes, and sprays.Apple-tree borers.
The Gipsy Moth and the Brown-Tail Moth and Their Control
"This bulletin describes briefly the seasonal history and habits of [the gypsy moth and the brown-tail moth] and suggests the best methods for their control, determined and adopted as a result of many extensive experiments." -- p. 5
Eradication of Ferns from Pasture Lands in the Eastern United States
"There are nearly 7,500 recognized species of ferns in the world, of which number over 200 are known to be native to the United States. A few species have become weed pests in this country, and it is to a discussion of the control of these weedy ferns that this bulletin is devoted. The parts of the United States in which ferns are bad weeds are, principally, (1) the hill country of the Northeastern States and the higher portions of the Appalachian Mountain region as far south as Georgia, and (2) the Pacific coast country west of the Cascade Mountains.... This publication deals only with fern eradication in the Eastern States." -- p. 1-2
How to Attract Birds in Northeastern United States
"The means of increasing the number of birds about our homes are few and simple. They comprise adequate protection and the provision of suitable nesting places, food, and water.... This bulletin [recommends] practicable methods of attracting birds about homes [in the northeastern United States]. Especial attention will be given to the value of fruit-bearing shrubs and trees." -- title page. Protection for birds, winter feeding, water supplies, and nesting boxes and birdhouses are also discussed.
The Control of the Chestnut Bark Disease
Report discussing the spread of the chestnut bark disease, including its causes, symptoms, modes of transmission, financial consequences, and the possible methods of controlling it.
The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control
Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, sucking the juices of the plant and causing a swelling in the stem. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks no other kind of plant. The injury which it does to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the depredations of these two insects are often confused by farmers. This paper is intended, therefore, to give a brief outline of the life history and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended." -- p. 3-4
Oil and Gas Wells through Workable Coal Beds: Papers and Discussions
From Preface: "In carrying out such a policy with reference to the subject under consideration, the Bureau of Mines invited the State geologists, mine inspectors, and a number of coal operators and oil and gas well drillers from the States interested to meet representatives of the Bureau of Mines in Pittsburgh, Pa., for a discussion of the subject during February 7 and February 8, 1913. This adjourned meeting of the conference will be held at an early date and its report will be printed in a later edition of this bulletin, with such additional suggestions as may be received by the Bureau of Mines. The bureau will be glad, therefore, to receive at the earliest practicable date any additional suggestions or any additional information throwing light on the matters discussed in this bulletin."
The Feldspars of the New England and North Appalachian States
From Introduction: "The investigations presented in this bulletin have been undertaken by the bureau with a view to a better understanding of the conditions which confront the producer of commercial feldspar and also with the object of determining wherein the various deposits of feldspar differ."