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Uranium Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Data from the Area of the Noatak and Portions of the Baird Mountains and Ambler River Quadrangles, Alaska
From introduction: This report describes work done in the Noatak and portions of the Baird Mountains and Ambler River, Alaska, National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangles (1:250 000 scale) by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) as part of the nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR).
Uranium Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance of the McGrath and Talkeetna NTMS Quadrangles, Alaska, Including Concentrations of Forty-Three Additional Elements
From abstract: During the summer of 1977, 1268 water and 1206 sediment samples were collected from 1292 lakes and streams throughout the 33 600-km2 area within the boundaries of the McGrath and Talkeetna National Topographic Map Series quadrangles in south-central Alaska. Each of the water samples was analyzed for uranium and 12 other elements, and each of the sediment samples was analyzed for uranium, thorium, and 41 other elements. All of the field and analytical data are listed in appendixes to this report, but only the uranium and thorium data are discussed herein.
Eligibility of Indoor Plumbing Under Alaska Sanitation Infrastructure Grant Program
This is a memorandum to answer questions in regards to the Village Safe Water (VSW) Program,
National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Dixon Entrance Quadrangle, Alaska
From Introduction: "The Dixon Entrance Quandrangle, Alaska (Fig. 1), was evaluated to identify geologic environments and delineate areas that exhibit characteristics favorable for uranium deposits of at least 100 tons U3O8 in rocks that have a minimum grade of 100 pm U308."
National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Dixon Entrance Quadrangle, Alaska, Appendix A-C
Appendices containing supplementary data on uranium occurrences in the Dixon Entrance Quadrangle to accompany a report on U.S. uranium resources in Alaska.
Selected Significant Mineral Deposits in Alaska: A Minerals Availability System Overview
Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing significant Alaskan mineral deposits. As stated in the abstract, "this Bureau of Mines publication presents a summary of mining activity in Alaska, as well as institutional and infrastructural factors affecting mineral development in Alaska" (p. 1). This report includes maps, tables, and illustrations.
Tin Reconnaissance of the Kanuti and Hodzana Rivers Uplands, Central Alaska
Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing mineral development potentials of Central Alaska. Investigations on location, geology, and sampling methods are presented. This report includes maps, tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Critical and Strategic Minerals in Alaska: Cobalt, the Platinum-Group Metals, and Chromite
Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing critical and strategic Alaskan minerals. As stated in the introduction, "this is the first report on these Bureau of Mines investigations. It summarizes available information about deposits and past production of cobalt, the platinum-group metals, and chromite, which was obtained during investigations of these metals through May 1981" (p. 2). This report includes tables, illustrations, photographs, and a map.
Geology of the Portage Pass Area, Alaska
Abstract: The Portage Pass area is in south-central Alaska, and includes part of the narrow neck of land that joins the Kenai Peninsula with the mainland to the north. This region is in general mountainous, elevations ranging from sea level to more than 4,000 feet on the peaks bordering the area. Several glaciers, all of which are apparently receding, extend into the area. Vegetation, chiefly alder and cottonwood on the valley lowlands and some spruce and hemlock on the lower slopes, extends to an elevation of about 1,000 feet, above which the slopes are bare except for occasional clumps of brush. The bedrock of the entire area is slate, argillite, and graywacke, apparently part of the same great series that extends from the Kenai Peninsula into the Prince William Sound region and is at least in part of Cretaceous age. The only igneous rocks recognized in the area are a few acidic dikes and a small diabase dike. Small, irregular quartz veinlets are widespread. The structure is not only complex but, owing to extensive metamorphism, is in many places obscure. A general northeast strike and steep to vertical dips of both bedding and cleavage planes are the rule, but there appears to be some broad folding along steeply northeast-pitching axes. Although no large faults have been recognized, much movement has occurred along many small faults, shear zones, and bedding planes. All observed faults and shear zones trend northeastward. There are no mines in this area. Some mineralization of quartz veins was noted at a few places, and some prospecting has been done, but no workable deposits are known.
Geology and Coal Resources of the Homer District, Kenai Coal Field, Alaska
From abstract: The Homer district of the Kenai coal field is about 100 miles southwest of Anchorage, in south-central Alaska. It covers an area of about 1,100 square miles on the west side of the Kenai Peninsula, between Tustumena Lake and Kachemak Bay. The principal settlement is Homer, at the southern end of the district, which is connected by the gravel-surfaced Sterling Highway with the Alaska highway system and The Alaska Railroad, and is also served by ocean transportation and one airline.
Geology and Coal Resources of the Little Susitna District, Matanuska Coal Field, Alaska
From introduction: This report is based on preliminary surface mapping in the summer of 1952 and on subsurface exploration with a bulldozer powerauger unit in the summers of 1953 and 1954. In 1952 F. F. Barnes was assisted by Alfred Oestreich, geologist, and Lewis Ladwig and Richard Pack, field assistants. From July 2 to August 31, 1953, F. F. Barnes and Daniel Sokol were assisted by W.T. Ashlock and R. E. Rowland, field assistants, and by a bulldozer operator-mechanic. From June 23 to July 27, 1954, Barnes and Sokol were assisted by A. E. Burford and W. S. Hopkins, geologists, and an operator-mechanic.
Preliminary Index to Geological Survey Trace Elements Reports on Alaska for the Period January 1945-December 1952
From introduction: Since 1945 the Alaskan Trace Elements Unit of the U. S. Geological. Survey has been engaged in reconnaissance for radioactive deposits in Alaska, first on behalf of the Manhattan Engineer District, later on behalf of the Atomic Energy Commission. During the period January 1945 through December 1952, 42 reports in the Survey's Trace Elements Investigations series and 18 reports in the Trace Elements Memorandum series, a totaJ of 60 reports, have been completed or are in preparation Of these 60 reports 44 have been completed and transmitted to the Commission as of December 31, 1952.
Alaska Emergency Management and Homeland Security Statutory Authorities Summarized
This report is one of a series that profiles the emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and three territories (American Samoa, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). Each profile identifies the more significant elements of state statutes, generally as codified. This report focuses on the state of Alaska.
Company Towns Versus Company Camps in Developing Alaska's Mineral Resources
Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing comparisons between company camps and company towns in Alaska's mineral properties. The cost differences between operating towns, camps, and commuting options are presented. This report includes maps, tables, and illustrations.
Surface-Water Quality in the Campbell Creek Basin, Anchorage, Alaska
From introduction: Data adequate to describe general flow conditions have been collected on most major streams in the Anchorage area, but comparable water-quality data needed to determine the effect of urbanization on the streams are scarce. Thus, in 1980 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Municipality of Anchorage, began a study of the effects of urban runoff on stream-water quality. A premise of the study was that urbanization does have an effect on the quality of surface runoff. The primary purpose of the study was to determine differences in water-quality characteristics between streams that drain natural and urban areas in Anchorage.
Geologic Studies in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey, 1990
A collection of papers which report on the geologic investigations in Alaska. It represents the broad range of U.S. Geologic Survey research activities carried out in Alaska.
Mineral Resources of Alaska: Report on Progress of Investigations in 1913
From preface: The present volume is the tenth of a series of annual bulletins treating of the progress of mining in Alaska and summarizing the results achieved during the year in the investigations of the mineral resources of the Territory.
Report on Progress of Investigations of Mineral Resources of Alaska in 1904
From letter of transmittal: The report contains fourteen papers, prepared by ten members of the geologic corps, who have been engaged in Alaskan investigations during the last year. In this report an attempt has been made to summarize the economic results of last season's field work. Geologic matter has been entirely excluded, except where it has a direct bearing on the subjects under discussion. While such a report can have no permanent value, other than as a record of mining conditions during the year, it is believed that its prompt publication will help the mining industry of Alaska.
Report on Progress of Investigations of Mineral Resources of Alaska in 1905
From introduction: This report contains papers on summaries of progress in various phases of the mining industry during the last year, preliminary accounts of investigations in progress or completed, and statements of the results of minor investigations not to be published elsewhere.
Preliminary Report on the Ketchikan Mining District, Alaska, with an Introductory Sketch of the Geology of Southeastern Alaska
From introduction: Since 1898 the United States Geological Survey has been carrying on a systematic investigation of the mineral resources of Alaska.As the northern mining districts of southeastern Alaska had already been the subject of an investigation by Dr. Becker in 1895,a and as the Ketchikan district was being rapidly developed, it was decided to spend the greater part of the short season in the Ketchikan district and in the fall to make a more hasty reconnaissance of the northern belt, in order to obtain a general familiarity with the region and, if possible, to establish some correlations. This plan was carried out, and the results of the work are embodied in the following report.
Selected Annotated Bibliography and Index Map of Thorium and Rare-Earth Deposits in the United States and Alaska
Introduction: Thorium and rare-earth metals have come into strategic importance in this country in the last few years with the potential use of thorium in the production of atomic power and the development of new uses for the rare earths in the aircraft industry.
Geology of Part of the Nelchina River Gabbronorite and Associated Rocks, South-Central Alaska
The following report analyzes the geological features of a 6-km by 0.3-km strip of glacially polished rocks of the Nelchina River Gabbronorite located in the eastern part of the Anchorage quadrangle.
Sediment Transport in the Tanana River near Fairbanks, Alaska, 1980-81
From abstract: Suspended-sediment and bedload-transport rates for the Tanana River near Fairbanks, Alaska, can be related to water discharge, and annual sediment loads can be computed using these relations.
[Letters from Major General Craig E. Campbell to each member of the BRAC - September 6, 2005]
Letters from Major General Craig E. Campbell to each member of the 2005 BRAC Commission regarding Eielson Air Force Base and the Commission's recommendation to keep facility open.
The Chakachamna-Stony Region, Alaska
A report on the exploration and survey of the Chakachamna-Stony Region of Alaska.
Glaciation in Alaska
From introduction: The history of glaciation in Alaska offers a fascinating field for study. Because of the remarkable development and easy accessibility of valley and piedmont glaciers in the coastal mountains, Alaska has long been popularly conceived as a land of ice and snow, a concept that is only slowly being corrected. To the student of glaciation, however, Alaska affords a unique opportunity to observe the formation, movement, and dissipation of the many living glaciers, to examine the results of glacial erosion on a gigantic scale, and to discover and work out the sequence of Pleistocene events as shown by the topographic forms in both glaciated and unglaciated areas and by the deposits left by ice and water during earlier stages of glaciation.
The Kantishna Region, Alaska
This report describes the results of expeditions to map the geologic and topographic features of the Kantishna region of Alaska.
Kodiak and Vicinity Alaska
From abstract: Kodiak Island, although the site of the earliest white settlement in Alaska and the center of a vigorous fishing industry, is still largely unexplored, except for a strip immediately adjacent to the shores. The heavy growth of vegetation makes access to the interior of the island difficult, and few trails penetrate far from the coast. Mining activity in the past has been confined to somewhat desultory exploitation of beach sands, which in places carry gold, though some gold-bearing lodes have been staked, and a few unsuccessful attempts at lode mining have been made.
Notes on the Geology of the Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutian Islands
Abstract: During the spring of 1932 an opportunity was offered by the United States Navy for a geologist to accompany an expedition organized to make a reconnaissance of the western part of Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutian Islands. This expedition visited several localities the geology of which was little known. It was found, as had already been expected, that the islands west of Unimak Pass are composed mainly of basic volcanic lavas and fragmental materials, into which have later been injected dikes, sills, and considerable masses of intrusive rocks, some of which are of acidic types and of granitic texture. These westward islands are bordered both to the north and south by depressions 2,000 fathoms or more in depth, and the islands have apparently been built up from that depth by the ejection and extrusion of volcanic materials since early Tertiary time. No rocks of proved pre-Tertiary age were seen, and the only sedimentary materials present may well have been derived from the erosion of the volcanic islands after they were built up above sea level. On the Alaska Peninsula pre-Tertiary sediments through which the volcanic materials broke to the surface are abundantly present. There is evidence that all the larger islands and the higher portions of the peninsula were severely glaciated during Pleistocene time. Each of the larger islands was the center of ice accumulation and dispersal, and the present topography, except upon recently active volcanic cones, shows strongly the effects of glacial sculpture.
The Willow Creek-Kashwitna District, Alaska
From introduction: The district described in this report is a triangular area covering about 300 square miles in the southwestern part of the Talkeetna Mountains. The Kashwitna River forms the northern boundary, the Susitna Valley flats the western, and the Willow Creek gold district, which is in the extreme southwestern part of the Talkeetna Mountains, the southern. As the area examined is not a distinct geographic unit, its boundaries being arbitrarily chosen and set only by the limitation of time spent in the field, a description of its geography applies to practically the entire western and southern portions of the Talkeetna Mountains, of which it is a part.
Kodiak and Adjacent Islands, Alaska
From abstract: The Kodiak group of islands, having an area of 4,900 square miles, lie on the Pacific Ocean side of the base of the Alaska Peninsula. Although the town of Kodiak is the oldest continuously occupied white settlement in Alaska, the interior of many of the islands is still little explored and unmapped, for the heavy growth of vegetation makes inland travel difficult, and few trails penetrate far from the coast.
Impacts of Climate Change and Variability on Hydropower in Southeast Alaska: Planning for a robust Energy Future
This is a report on climate changes effect on planning the implementation of hydroelectric power infrastructures.
Reconnaissance of Surface-Water Resources in the Kobuk River Basin, Alaska, 1979-80
From introduction: This report contains data on physiographic and climatic characteristics of the Kobuk River basin, as well as stream channel hydraulic properties, seasonal quantity and quality of surface waters, floods, channel erosion, and benthic invertebrates. The data show the magnitude and ranges of stream discharge, width, depth, and velocity, of flow that can be expected in late winter and summer periods, and indicate flood and erosion hazards in the basin.
Volcanic Activity in the Aleutian Arc
Including a list of all known volcanoes and a summary of activity betwen 1760 and 1948.
The Coal Resources of the Yukon, Alaska
An examination of coal deposits along the Yukon River conducted in 1902 mostly along the river banks from Dawson, Yukon to the delta.
A Reconnaissance of the Northwestern Portion of Seward Peninsula, Alaska
From introduction: In response to an urgent demand by the public, the Geological Survey, in 1900, undertook a topographic and geologic reconnaissance of the southern half of the Seward Peninsula.( The area mapped embraced the more important gold fields of the peninsula. The topographic map made in 1900 included the drainage of Bering Sea from Cape Darby to Port Clarence, the southern drainage of Grantley Harbor and Imuruk Basin, and the northern drainage of Norton Sound. A geologic reconnaissance was also made of the York mining district and of part of the Kuzitrin drainage.
The Tin Deposits of the York Region, Alaska
From introduction: It is the purpose of this bulletin to combine the results obtained by the USGS parties that have visited the region, together with the information derived from a study of specimens of tin ores and associated minerals recently brought from the York region by outside parties.
Geology of the Craig Quadrangle, Alaska
From abstract: The Craig quadrangle, in southeastern Alaska, lies entirely within the Tongass National Forest and includes a large part of Prince of Wales Island, the largest island of the Alexander Archipelago. Sedimentary, volcanic, and metamorphic rocks of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age are exposed as complexly folded and faulted sequences. Paleozoic rocks occupy a broad geanticlinal area comprising Prince of Wales Island and the islands to the west. Metamorphosed Mesozoic rocks form a geosynclinal area along and east of Clarence Strait. Granitic and dioritic stocks and masses, mainly of Mesozoic age, intrude the Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks. Remnants of volcanic rocks of Tertiary age exist on Suemez Island, and scattered areas of Tertiary clastic rocks and volcanic rocks are exposed near Clarence Strait. Deposits of Quaternary age are mainly thin glacial deposits and narrow bands of stream alluvium.
Report and Analysis of Test Data From 1998 Trawl Positioning Gear Trails in the Puget Sound Dabob Bay, Washington
A report about a test which can determine which USBL system performs best in conditions that approximate those in Bristol Bay, Alaska. In the future, the Alaska Fisheries Science Center will need to track bottom fishing trawls in order to assess their impact upon the sea floor biology in Alaska.
Cruise Ship Pollution: Background, Laws and Regulations, and Key Issues
This report describes the several types of waste streams that cruise ships may discharge and emit. It identifies the complex body of international and domestic laws that address pollution from cruise ships. It then describes federal and state legislative activity concerning cruise ships in Alaskan waters and activities in a few other states, as well as current industry initiatives to manage cruise ship pollution.
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR): New Directions in the 110th Congress
This report provides background and analysis regarding the legislative history of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska. It also discusses actions in the 109th Congress, the energy resources, oil and natural gas and the impact they have on wildlife.
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR): Controversies for the 108th Congress
This report discusses one major element of the energy debate in the 108th Congress, which has been whether to approve energy development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska, and if so, under what conditions, or whether to continue to prohibit development to protect the area's biological resources. The Refuge is an area rich in fauna, flora, and commercial oil potential. Current law forbids energy leasing in the Refuge.
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Background and Issues
This report discusses the ongoing debate about whether or not to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) for energy development. The report discusses arguments for and against such development and related pieces of legislation. It does not analyze specific proposals to develop or protect the Refuge. Rather, it provides basic material for analyzing possibilities and implications of the major issues that have been the focus of the legislative debate over its fate.
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR): Controversies for the 108th Congress
This report discusses the ongoing debate about whether or not to approve energy development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Current law forbids energy leasing in the Refuge. This report addresses several legislative options on the issue, as well as policymakers' arguments for and against development, especially in the wake of increasing terrorism since 2000-2001.
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR): Controversies for the 108th Congress
This report discusses the ongoing debate about whether or not to approve energy development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Current law forbids energy leasing in the Refuge. This report addresses several legislative options on the issue, as well as policymakers' arguments for and against development, especially in the wake of increasing terrorism since 2000-2001.
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR): Controversies for the 108th Congress
This report discusses the ongoing debate about whether or not to approve energy development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Current law forbids energy leasing in the Refuge. This report addresses several legislative options on the issue, as well as policymakers' arguments for and against development, especially in the wake of increasing terrorism since 2000-2001.
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR): Controversies for the 108th Congress
This report discusses the ongoing debate about whether or not to approve energy development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Current law forbids energy leasing in the Refuge. This report addresses several legislative options on the issue, as well as policymakers' arguments for and against development, especially in the wake of increasing terrorism since 2000-2001.
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR): Controversies for the 108th Congress
This report discusses the ongoing debate about whether or not to approve energy development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Current law forbids energy leasing in the Refuge. This report addresses several legislative options on the issue, as well as policymakers' arguments for and against development, especially in the wake of increasing terrorism since 2000-2001.
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR): Controversies for the 108th Congress
This report discusses the ongoing debate about whether or not to approve energy development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Current law forbids energy leasing in the Refuge. This report addresses several legislative options on the issue, as well as policymakers' arguments for and against development, especially in the wake of increasing terrorism since 2000-2001.
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR): Controversies for the 108th Congress
This report discusses the ongoing debate about whether or not to approve energy development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Current law forbids energy leasing in the Refuge. This report addresses several legislative options on the issue, as well as policymakers' arguments for and against development, especially in the wake of increasing terrorism since 2000-2001.