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Environmental Protection Agency: FY1998 Budget

Description: EPA appropriations are included in the annual VA-HUD-Independent Agencies Appropriation Bill. Two major issues were whether Superfund cleanups should be accelerated in the absence of statutory reforms and whether the requested state assistance funds are adequate. Because the House and Senate were in agreement on not granting the requested 50% increase in Superfund and in passing increased state funds, the chief conference issue was expected to focus on the roughly $225 million difference between the House and Senate versions. However, a veto threat over Superfund program funding made this a key conference issue.
Date: October 14, 1997
Creator: Lee, Martin R.

Environmental Protection Agency: FY1998 Budget

Description: EPA appropriations are included in the annual VA-HUD-Independent Agencies Appropriation Bill. Two major issues were whether Superfund cleanups should be accelerated in the absence of statutory reforms and whether the requested state assistance funds are adequate. Because the House and Senate were in agreement on not granting the requested 50% increase in Superfund and in passing increased state funds, the chief conference issue focused on the roughly $225 million difference between the House and Senate versions.
Date: January 12, 1998
Creator: Lee, Martin R.

The Budget for Fiscal Year 1998

Description: This report discusses the efforts to reach an agreement on the fiscal year (FY) 1998 budget were, in many respects, a continuation of the efforts to balance the federal budget by (or before) FY2002. The proposals and legislation for FY1998 were designed to move the budget further towards balance.
Date: July 22, 1998
Creator: Winters, Philip D.

The Department of Energy FY1998 Research and Development Budget and Issues

Description: This report focuses on the R&D programs. DOE has divided its activities into four major business categories: Resource, Science and Technology, National Security, and Environmental Quality. Each has an R&D component, although the R&D funding is concentrated in the first three. Table 1 (on the next page) shows FY1997 R&D funding, the FY1998 request, and the FY1998 appropriation actions by those categories
Date: December 3, 1997
Creator: Rowberg, Richard E

The Department of Energy's FY1998 Budget

Description: This issue brief describes the FY1998 request for DOE's major programs, its implications, and congressional action on the DOE budget. Table 1 at the end of the issue brief highlights the FY1998 DOE budget request. House and Senate marks and the final budget enacted will be included in revised versions as the appropriations bills move through the Congress.
Date: November 7, 1997
Creator: Humphries, Marc

AIDS Funding for Federal Government Programs: FY1981-FY1999

Description: This report provides a synopsis of the budget activity related to AIDS from the discovery of the disease in 1981 through FY1999. Funding for AIDS research, prevention and treatment programs within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) discretionary budget has increased from $200,000 in FY1981 to an estimated $3.85 billion in FY1999.
Date: March 31, 1998
Creator: Johnson, Judith A.

Defense Authorization and Appropriation Bills: FY1970-FY2006

Description: This report is a research aid, which lists the DOD authorization bills (Table 1) and appropriations bills (Table 2). This report includes all the pertinent information on the passage of these bills through the legislative process: bill numbers, report numbers, dates reported and passed, recorded vote numbers and vote tallies, dates of passage of the conference reports with their numbers and votes, vetoes, substitutions, dates of final passage, and public law numbers. Table 3 shows real growth or decline in national defense funding for FY1940-FY2009. Table 4 gives a more detailed picture of both regular and supplemental defense appropriations from the 103rd Congress to the present (FY1993-FY2005). Table 5 shows the President’s DOD appropriations budget requests for FY1950-FY2005 vs. final amount enacted.
Date: April 21, 2006
Creator: Coipuram, Thomas, Jr.

Defense Authorization and Appropriations Bills: FY1970-FY2006

Description: This report is a research aid, which lists the DOD authorization bills (Table 1) and appropriations bills (Table 2). This report includes all the pertinent information on the passage of these bills through the legislative process: bill numbers, report numbers, dates reported and passed, recorded vote numbers and vote tallies, dates of passage of the conference reports with their numbers and votes, vetoes, substitutions, dates of final passage, and public law numbers. Table 3 shows real growth or decline in national defense funding for FY1940-FY2009. Table 4 gives a more detailed picture of both regular and supplemental defense appropriations from the 103rd Congress to the present (FY1993-FY2005). Table 5 shows the President’s DOD appropriations budget requests for FY1950-FY2005 vs. final amount enacted.
Date: June 13, 2006
Creator: Coipuram, Thomas, Jr.

Defense Authorization and Appropriations Bills: FY1970-FY2006

Description: This report is a research aid, which lists the DOD authorization bills (Table 1) and appropriations bills (Table 2). This report includes all the pertinent information on the passage of these bills through the legislative process: bill numbers, report numbers, dates reported and passed, recorded vote numbers and vote tallies, dates of passage of the conference reports with their numbers and votes, vetoes, substitutions, dates of final passage, and public law numbers. Table 3 shows real growth or decline in national defense funding for FY1940-FY2009. Table 4 gives a more detailed picture of both regular and supplemental defense appropriations from the 103rd Congress to the present (FY1993-FY2005). Table 5 shows the President’s DOD appropriations budget requests for FY1950-FY2005 vs. final amount enacted.
Date: June 13, 2006
Creator: Coipuram, Thomas, Jr.

Multilateral Development Banks: U.S. Contributions FY1998-2009

Description: This report shows in tabular form how much the Administration requested and how much Congress appropriated during the past 11 years for U.S. payments to the multilateral development banks (MDBs). It also provides a brief description of the MDBs and the ways they fund their operations. It will be updated periodically. Three companion reports provide further information on the MDBs. See CRS Report RS20793, Multilateral Development Banks: Basic Background, CRS Report RS20791, Multilateral Development Banks: Procedures for U.S. Participation, and CRS Report RS22134 International Financial Institutions: Funding U.S. Participation.
Date: August 8, 2008
Creator: Sanford, Jonathan E.

Department of State and Foreign Operations Appropriations: A Fact Sheet on Legislation, FY1995-FY2015

Description: This report discusses the foreign affairs appropriations passed within the last 21 years; nearly all of them were passed within omnibus, consolidated, or full-year continuing resolutions, and usually after the start of the new fiscal year. Many foreign policy experts contend that stand-alone appropriation legislation would allow for a more rigorous debate on specific foreign policy activities. They also believe that the practice of delayed appropriations has constrained ongoing program operating levels and the ability to introduce or fund new programs that did not exist in the previous year's budget.
Date: March 24, 2015
Creator: Epstein, Susan B.

Laboratory directed research and development FY98 annual report

Description: In 1984, Congress and the Department of Energy (DOE) established the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program to enable the director of a national laboratory to foster and expedite innovative research and development (R and D) in mission areas. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) continually examines these mission areas through strategic planning and shapes the LDRD Program to meet its long-term vision. The goal of the LDRD Program is to spur development of new scientific and technical capabilities that enable LLNL to respond to the challenges within its evolving mission areas. In addition, the LDRD Program provides LLNL with the flexibility to nurture and enrich essential scientific and technical competencies and enables the Laboratory to attract the most qualified scientists and engineers. The FY98 LDRD portfolio described in this annual report has been carefully structured to continue the tradition of vigorously supporting DOE and LLNL strategic vision and evolving mission areas. The projects selected for LDRD funding undergo stringent review and selection processes, which emphasize strategic relevance and require technical peer reviews of proposals by external and internal experts. These FY98 projects emphasize the Laboratory's national security needs: stewardship of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, responsibility for the counter- and nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction, development of high-performance computing, and support of DOE environmental research and waste management programs.
Date: May 1, 1999
Creator: Al-Ayat, R & Holzrichter, J

FY98 Final Report Initial Interfacial Chemical Control for Enhancement of Composite Material Strength

Description: The U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) sponsored this research project to support the development of new self-assembled monolayer fiber coatings. These coatings can greatly increase the bond strength between the fiber and the resin matrix of a composite material. Composite ammunition components molded from such materials will exhibit higher strength than current materials, and will provide a major improvement in the performance of composites in military applications. Use of composite materials in military applications is desirable because of the lighter weight of the materials and their high strengths. The FY97 project investigated initial interfacial chemical control for enhancement of composite material strength. The core of the project was to modify the covalent interface of glass fibers (or other reinforcing fibers) to induce strong, uniform, defect-free adhesion between the fibers' surfaces and the polymer matrix. Installing a self-assembled monolayer tailored to the specific matrix resin accomplished this. Simply, the self-assembled monolayer modifies the fiber to make it appear to have the same chemical composition as the resin matrix. The self-assembled monolayer creates a receptive, hydrophobic interface that the thermoset resin (or polymer precursors) would wet more effectively, leading to a higher contact surface area and more efficient adhesion. The FY97 work phase demonstrated that it is possible to increase the adhesive strength, as well as increase the heat deflection temperature through the use of self-assembled monolayer.
Date: October 14, 1999
Creator: Fryxell, GE; Alford, KL; Simmons, KL; Voise, RD & Samuels, WD

Superconductivity for electric systems program plan, FY 1996--FY 2000

Description: This describes a comprehensive, integrated approach for the development of HTS (high-temperature superconductivity) technology for cost-effective use in electric power applications. This approach supports the program`s mission: to develop the technology that could lead to industrial commercialization of HTS electric power applications, such as fault-current limiters, motors, generators, transmission cables, superinductors, and superconducting energy storage. The vision is that, by 2010, the US power systems equipment industry will regain a major share of the global market by offering superconducting products that outperform the competition; and in US, the power grid will gain increased efficiency and stability by incorporating many kinds of HTS devices. After an overview and a discussion of the program plan (wires, systems technology, partnership initiative), this document discusses technology status, stakeholders, and the role of US DOE.
Date: March 1, 1996

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center FY97--FY98 work proposal

Description: Alcator C-Mod is the high-field, high-density divertor tokamak in the world fusion program. It is one of five divertor experiments capable of plasma currents exceeding one megamp. Because of its compact dimensions, Alcator C-Mod investigates an essential area in parameter space, which complements the world`s larger experiments, in establishing the tokamak physics database. Three key areas of investigation have been called out in which Alcator C-Mod has a vital role to play: (1) divertor research on C-Mod takes advantage of the advanced divertor shaping, the very high scrap-off-layer power density, unique abilities in impurity diagnosis, and the High-Z metal wall, to advance the physics understanding of this critical topic; (2) in transport studies, C-Mod is making critical tests of both empirical scalings and theoretically based interpretations of tokamak transport, at dimensional parameters that are unique but dimensionless parameters often comparable to those in much larger experiments; (3) in the area of Advanced Tokamak research, so important to concept optimization, the high-field design of the device also provides long pulse length, compared to resistive skin time, which provides an outstanding opportunity to investigate the extent to which enhanced confinement and stability can be sustained in steady-state, using active profile control. In addition to these main programmatic emphasis, important enabling research is being performed in MHD stability and control, which has great significance for the immediate design of ITER, and in the physics and engineering of ICRF, which is the main auxiliary heating method on C-Mod.
Date: March 1, 1996

Fiscal Year 1998 report theoretical studies of ground energy coupling

Description: A method for calculating the redistribution of resonance radiation in hot, dense plasmas is developed by extending the Frequency Fluctuation Model (FFM). This paper is devoted to a brief review of lineshape theory in the linear response approximation, and an introduction to the FFM approach to the modeling of lineshapes in plasmas. This discussion begins with a consideration of the spectral lines emitted by complex ions in plasmas. As is well known, the lineshape is determined by the time- dependent coupling of the ion with the plasma environment. This plasma-emitter interaction, leads to Stark broadening of the spectral lines, and traditionally has been considered in the approximation which treats the ef&@ of the electrons on the emitting ion in the impact limit while the ionic perturbation is� taken to be quasi-static. In this approximation, the time dependence of the perturbation has been eliminated, resulting in a spectral line shape that has purely homogeneous and inhomogeneous contributions and that is described by a simple sum of independent electron imp� act broadened static components. In order to clarify the concepts presented, examples of radiative redistribution functions for simple cases are presented. Included is an example of an X-ray laser pumped system which illustrates the capability of the mpdel to provide a sensitive method for the study of radiative transfer under plasma conditions of partial redistribution. That is, in cases where the strong mixing limit is not attained so that the mixing of the inhomogeneous spectral line components is not fast enough to produce a completely redistributed line.
Date: December 10, 1998
Creator: Klein, L.

Enhanced surveillance program annual report FY98. Dynamic behavior of Pu and U (intermediate strain rates) -- LA12

Description: The Kolsky-Hopkinson Bar Dynamic Test Facility in Building PF-4 at TA-55 recently became operational and the first series of plutonium samples from a baseline alloy were successfully tested on December 8, 1997 through the dedicated efforts of a large number of people in groups NMT-9, NMT-11, MST-8, NMT-5, and JCI. The Enhanced Surveillance Program provided the necessary support for this achievement. The Kolsky-Hopkinson bar is an instrument designed to measure the uniaxial compression stress-strain characteristics of special nuclear materials (SNM) in a glovebox environment at intermediate strain rates (typically 500 s{sup {minus}1} to 10,000 s{sup {minus}1}), over a wide temperature range (cryogenic up to near-melting temperatures), and up to strains of about 50% per test. Due to radiation contamination hazards, SNM samples are contained within a specially designed glovebox with only a small portion of the bar system. The uniaxial high-strain-rate deformation behavior of SNM materials is revealed by stress-strain-strain rate curves calculated from strain signals acquired by gauges on the pressure bars. The compressive stress-strain mechanical behavior of a range of weapons-relevant SNM materials (both baseline and stockpile-aged plutonium and enriched uranium), measured over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures, is necessary to support the development of predictive constitutive models and allows assessment of the mechanical response of SNM as a function of age, processing, and composition. Accurate constitutive material models are essential for simulating the high-rate deformation response of weapon materials. Most FY98 milestones and deliverables were successfully met or were partially completed on schedule. In the case of enriched uranium, testing began six months ahead of schedule. Upgrading the testing temperature capability took six months more than originally planned as a result of the highly formalized and rigorous design change plan (DCP) requirements at TA-55. Specimen availability continues to be a bottle-neck due to over-subscribed ...
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Blumenthal, W.R.