UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 18 Matching Results

Search Results

Dodder

Description: Report discussing the weed commonly known as dodder or love vine and methods for controlling it. If procedures are properly followed, eradication of the weed in the United States is possible. Topics include varieties of dodder and plants that susceptible to attack by it, its life cycle, and ways it is unintentionally introduced to farms.
Date: 1921
Creator: Hansen, A. A.

Drainage of Irrigated Lands

Description: Report discussing "the drainage of irrigated lands which have been seriously injured or rendered wholly unproductive by the seepage of irrigation water or by the rise of alkali, or by both combined.... This report not only describes the condition of the land, the details of its draining, and the results which were obtained in particular cases, but gives carefully drawn deductions from the experiments, together with directions for draining lands which have become too wet or too alkaline under the ordinary methods of irrigation for profitable cultivation. Methods of draining are not so well established for irrigated land as for land in humid areas, which fact suggests the propriety of describing methods that have been tested in specific cases." -- p. 2
Date: 1909
Creator: Brown, Charles F.

Irrigation of Sugar Beets

Description: "A practical manual, giving methods pursued throughout the irrigated beet-growing sections and thereby furnishing information to new settlers in irrigated districts, as well as suggestions to beet growers as to the practices in States other than their own, should be of value in introducing the growing of beets and improving the methods of handling this important crop. As the matter now stands, each community where this industry has found favor is proceeding along lines suggested by local conditions which are more or less peculiar, and this bulletin is designed to be a compilation of the practices throughout the West, to which are added the results of experiments conducted by this Office in irrigation of sugar beets during the past four years." -- p. 9
Date: 1910
Creator: Roeding, F. W.

Sixty-Day and Kherson Oats

Description: Report discussing the results of experiments undertaken to determine the viability of early oats in different regions of the United States since early oats typically thrive only in the Corn Belt and Great Plains regions.
Date: 1910
Creator: Warburton, C. W. (Clyde William), 1879-1950

Grains for the Utah Dry Lands

Description: "This bulletin present the best available information on the small grain crops and varieties adapted to Utah dry lands and the cultural operations necessary to produce them." -- p. 3. The grains discussed are wheat, emmer, oats, and barley.
Date: 1917
Creator: Jones, Jenkin W. (Jenkin William), 1888- & Bracken, Aaron F.

The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, feeding on the juices of the plant and causing a slight swelling or distortion of the stem above the joint. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks wheat only. The injury which it causes to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the effects caused by these two insects are often confused by farmers." -- p. 1-2. This bulletin gives a brief outline of the life cycle and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended.
Date: 1940
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972 & Poos, F. W.

The Alfalfa Weevil and Methods of Controlling It

Description: "The alfalfa weevil destroys a great deal of alfalfa in northern Utah and southern Idaho. It also inhabits southwestern Wyoming and is spreading slowly to new territory in all directions. It may in time infest most of the United States. The adult, a small brown snout-beetle, and the larva, a green, worm-like creature, usually escape notice during the first two or three years that they are present in a locality, but as soon as they become numerous enough to do harm they are readily found, and their effect upon the appearance of the fields is conspicuous. Vigorous treatment is then necessary to prevent partial or total destruction of the first and second crops. The purpose of this bulletin is to show how serious the attack is to the farmer, how much territory it embraces and how it spreads, and to describe the insect, its work, and the methods which are effective in dealing with it." -- title page
Date: 1916
Creator: Reeves, Geo. I. (George I.), b. 1879; Miles, Philip B.; Chamberlin, Thomas R.; Snow, Sterling J. & Bower, Luther J.

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Date: 1919
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Date: 1928
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Date: 1933
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Because strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove helpful to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Date: 1941
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889- & Waldo, George F. (George Fordyce), b. 1898

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "Strawberries can be grown in those parts of the western Untied States in which ordinary farm crops are irrigated as well as in western Oregon and Washington, where irrigation is not essential but may be profitable. The principles of irrigating strawberries are essentially the same as those for other crops. Because strawberries are sensitive to the alkali salts that irrigation brings to the surface, such salts must be washed out or skimmed off. The strawberry grower, after choosing a suitable site and preparing the soil carefully, should select varieties adapted to his district and needs. He should use plants that are disease-free. In California, southern Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas the plants should have undergone a rest period. Usually the growers plant during the period of greatest rainfall. By using the recommended systems of training and care before, during, and after setting of the plants and the suggested methods of decreasing diseases and insect pests, he should obtain better yields. A grower can furnish consumers a better product by using good methods of harvesting and shipment. He can prolong the fresh-fruit season only a little by the use of cold storage, but he can extend his market by growing varieties suitable for preserving, canning, and freezing." -- p. ii
Date: 1948
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889- & Waldo, George F. (George Fordyce), b. 1898

Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States

Description: "The information given in this bulletin should enable farmers in the Great Plains and Western States to select from the more common species of grasses some one or more suited to their needs [for soil and water conservation]. Common harvesting equipment and farm machinery can be adapted to the proper handling of native grasses. This brings the cost of such work within the means of most farmers." -- p. i. Among the grasses discussed are wheatgrass, buffalo grass, bluestem, grama, Bermuda grass, wild rye, hilaria, Sudan grass, bluegrass, panic grasses, dropseed, and needlegrass.
Date: 1939
Creator: Hoover, Max M. (Max Manley), 1895-

The Sugar-Beet Nematode in the Western States

Description: "The sugar-beet nematode is one of the most serious of the beet pests. It appears to have been imported with some shipments of beet seed many years ago. It has been found widely scattered in four of the western sugar-beet States and probably exists in other States where beets have been grown for several years. The sugar-beet nematode is the cause of a great deal of loss to the beet grower through reduction of his tonnage, and of a corresponding amount of loss to the sugar producer through reduction of the output of sugar. This bulletin treats of the nature and distribution of the sugar-beet nematode, indicates the most probable means by which this pest is spread, and suggests preventive measures and practical means of control." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Thorne, Gerald, 1890-1975 & Giddings, L. A.

Reseeding Range Lands of the Intermountain Region

Description: "Revegetating deteriorated range lands by sowing adaptable, nutritious, and palatable grasses is vital for adequate forage production in the Intermountain region, for profitable livestock raising, and as a safeguard against flood and erosion damage. The effect of serious droughts, greatly aggravated by overstocking, has resulted in the replacement of valuable perennial grasses by annual weeds and grasses that have much less value as forage for livestock or for proper soil protection. The abandonment of unsuccessful submarginal croplands has also added greatly to the vast acreage of deteriorated but potentially productive range lands of the region in need of revegetation. Proper guides and procedure for revegetating run-down ranges and abandoned dry farms by artificial reseeding are necessary to safeguard against costly pitfalls and to insure reasonable success. The procedures herein outlined are based on the experiences and research to date and should prove helpful to those administering range lands and producing livestock in the region comprising Utah, Nevada, southern Idaho, and southwestern Wyoming, commonly referred to as the Intermountain region." -- p. i
Date: 1939
Creator: Stewart, George; Walker, R. H. (Rudger Harper), 1902- & Price, Raymond

Regrassing for Soil Protection in the Southwest

Description: "This bulletin is designed to help the stockmen and farmers, of the Southwest [United States] particularly, in reestablishing depleted ranges where unfavorable climatic conditions and heavy demands on the range have served to make improvement of the range by natural means a slow and difficult process. It discusses the latest methods of artificial revegetation that have proved most effective in regrassing the ranges. It also discusses the more promising grasses and indicates that areas to which they are adapted. It explains the latest methods for harvesting seed and establishing grass on various sites under a wide range of conditions as to elevation, temperature, rainfall, and soils." -- p. i
Date: 1942
Creator: Flory, Evan L. & Marshall, Charles G.