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''After the Genome 5 Conference'' to be held October 6-10, 1999 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Description: OAK B139 The postgenomic era is arriving faster than anyone had imagined--sometime during 2000 we'll have a large fraction of the human genome sequence. Heretofore, our understanding of function has come from non-industrial experiments whose conclusions were largely framed in human language. The advent of large amounts of sequence data, and of ''functional genomic'' data types such as mRNA expression data, have changed this picture. These data share the feature that individual observations and measurements are typically relatively low value adding. Such data is now being generated so rapidly that the amount of information contained in it will surpass the amount of biological information collected by traditional means. It is tantalizing to envision using genomic information to create a quantitative biology with a very strong data component. Unfortunately, we are very early in our understanding of how to ''compute on'' genomic information so as to extract biological knowledge from i t. In fact, some current efforts to come to grips with genomic information often resemble a computer savvy library science, where the most important issues concern categories, classification schemes, and information retrieval. When exploring new libraries, a measure of cataloging and inventory is surely inevitable. However, at some point we will need to move from library science to scholarship.We would like to achieve a quantitative and predictive understanding of biological function. We realize that making the bridge from knowledge of systems to the sets of abstractions that constitute computable entities is not easy. The After the Genome meetings were started in 1995 to help the biological community think about and prepare for the changes in biological research in the face of the oncoming flow of genomic information. The term ''After the Genome'' refers to a future in which complete inventories of the gene products of entire organisms become available.Since then, ...
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: Brent, Roger

"After the Genome 5, Conference to be held October 6-10, 1999, Jackson Hole, Wyoming"

Description: The postgenomic era is arriving faster than anyone had imagined-- sometime during 2000 we'll have a large fraction of the human genome sequence. Heretofore, our understanding of function has come from non-industrial experiments whose conclusions were largely framed in human language. The advent of large amounts of sequence data, and of "functional genomic" data types such as mRNA expression data, have changed this picture. These data share the feature that individual observations and measurements are typically relatively low value adding. Such data is now being generated so rapidly that the amount of information contained in it will surpass the amount of biological information collected by traditional means. It is tantalizing to envision using genomic information to create a quantitative biology with a very strong data component. Unfortunately, we are very early in our understanding of how to "compute on" genomic information so as to extract biological knowledge from it. In fact, some current efforts to come to grips with genomic information often resemble a computer savvy library science, where the most important issues concern categories, classification schemes, and information retrieval. When exploring new libraries, a measure of cataloging and inventory is surely inevitable. However, at some point we will need to move from library science to scholarship. We would like to achieve a quantitative and predictive understanding of biological function. We realize that making the bridge from knowledge of systems to the sets of abstractions that constitute computable entities is not easy. The After the Genome meetings were started in 1995 to help the biological community think about and prepare for the changes in biological research in the face of the oncoming flow of genomic information. The term �After the Genome� refers to a future in which complete inventories of the gene products of entire organisms become available. Since then, ...
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: Brent, Roger

Assessment of a magnet system combining the advantages of cable-in-conduit forced-flow and pool-boiling magnets

Description: This paper presents an idea for a magnet system that could be used to advantage in tokamaks and other fusion engineering devices. Higher performance designs, specifically newer tokamaks such as those for the international Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) use Cable in Conduit Conductor (CICC) forced flow coils to advantage to meet field and current density requirements. Pool boiling magnets lack structural integrity to resist high magnetic forces since helium cooling areas must surround each conductor. A second problem is that any leak can threaten the voltage standoff integrity of the magnet system. This is because a leak can result in low-pressure helium gas becoming trapped by limited conductance in the magnet bundle and low-pressure helium has poor dielectric strength. The system proposed here is basically a CICC system, with it`s inherent advantages, but bathed in higher pressure supercritical helium to eliminate the leak and voltage break-down problems. Schemes to simplify helium coolant plumbing with the proposed system are discussed. A brief historical review of related magnet systems is included. The advantages and disadvantages of using higher pressure, supercritical helium in combination with solid electrical insulation in a CICC system are discussed. Related electrical data from some previous works are compiled and discussed.
Date: October 6, 1993
Creator: Slack, D.; Hassenzahl, W.; Felker, B. & Chaplin, M.

Closed ThUOX Fuel Cycle for LWRs with ADTT (ATW) Backend for the 21st Century

Description: A future nuclear energy scenario with a closed, thorium-uranium-oxide (ThUOX) fuel cycle and new light water reactors (TULWRs) supported by Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) systems could provide several improvements beyond today's once-through, UO{sub 2}-fueled nuclear technology. A deployment scenario with TULWRs plus ATWs to burn the actinides produced by these LWRs and to close the back-end of the ThUOX fuel cycle was modeled to satisfy a US demand that increases linearly from 80 GWe in 2020 to 200 GWe by 2100. During the first 20 years of the scenario (2000-2020), nuclear energy production in the US declines from today's 100 GWe to about 80 GWe, in accordance with forecasts of the US DOE's Energy Information Administration. No new nuclear systems are added during this declining nuclear energy period, and all existing LWRs are shut down by 2045. Beginning in 2020, ATWs that transmute the actinides from existing LWRs are deployed, along with TULWRs and additional ATWs with a support ratio of 1 ATW to 7 TULWRs to meet the energy demand scenario. A final mix of 174 GWe from TULWRs and 26 GWe from ATWs provides the 200 GWe demand in 2100. Compared to a once-through LWR scenario that meets the same energy demand, the TULWR/ATW concept could result in the following improvements: depletion of natural uranium resources would be reduced by 50%; inventories of Pu which may result in weapons proliferation will be reduced in quantity by more than 98% and in quality because of higher neutron emissions and 50 times the alpha-decay heating of weapons-grade plutonium; actinides (and possibly fission products) for final disposal in nuclear waste would be substantially reduced; and the cost of fuel and the fuel cycle may be 20-30% less than the once-through UO{sub 2} fuel cycle.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Beller, D.E.; Sailor, W.C. & Venneri, F.

Cluster algorithms with empahsis on quantum spin systems

Description: The purpose of this lecture is to discuss in detail the generalized approach of Kawashima and Gubernatis for the construction of cluster algorithms. We first present a brief refresher on the Monte Carlo method, describe the Swendsen-Wang algorithm, show how this algorithm follows from the Fortuin-Kastelyn transformation, and re=interpret this transformation in a form which is the basis of the generalized approach. We then derive the essential equations of the generalized approach. This derivation is remarkably simple if done from the viewpoint of probability theory, and the essential assumptions will be clearly stated. These assumptions are implicit in all useful cluster algorithms of which we are aware. They lead to a quite different perspective on cluster algorithms than found in the seminal works and in Ising model applications. Next, we illustrate how the generalized approach leads to a cluster algorithm for world-line quantum Monte Carlo simulations of Heisenberg models with S = 1/2. More succinctly, we also discuss the generalization of the Fortuin- Kasetelyn transformation to higher spin models and illustrate the essential steps for a S = 1 Heisenberg model. Finally, we summarize how to go beyond S = 1 to a general spin, XYZ model.
Date: October 6, 1995
Creator: Gubernatis, J.E. & Kawashima, Naoki

Conference summary

Description: The conference began with an introductory lecture by Bunakov. It is very appropriate that this workshop be held in Dubna as Bunakov reminded us that the experiments that motivated the current interest in the study of symmetry violation with neutrons were started here at Dubna by Alfimenkov, Pikelner, and collaborators. Bunakov discussed the fact that is the complexity of the compound nucleus that leads to large enhancement of parity violation near P-resonances and to the possibility of using statistical models to relate the measured parity violation to more-fundamental quantities. He also pointed out that it is a rare case in which complexity aids us. Bunakov did not point out that this is an example of another rare phenomena -- where theory has predicted correctly in advance the parity violating effects seen near p-resonances. As long ago as 1969, Karmanov and Lobov first predicted an enhancement of {gamma}-ray circular polarization near p-resonances. Sushkov and Flambaum later predicted asymmetries P {approximately} 10{sup {minus}2} for p-resonances and suggested {sup 117}Sn, {sup 139}La, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 238}U for study. Bunakov and Gudkov developed a theory describing the energy dependence of parity-violating effects over a large energy range. This theory predicted random signs for the parity-violating asymmetries.
Date: October 6, 1993
Creator: Seestrom, S. J.

Design Study of the Extraction System of the 3rd Generation ECR Ion Source

Description: A design study for the extraction system of the 3rd Generation super conducting ECR ion source at LBNL is presented. The magnetic design of the ion source has a mirror field of 4 T at the injection and 3 T at the extraction side and a radial field of 2.4 T at the plasma chamber wall. Therefore, the ion beam formation takes place in a strong axial magnetic field. Furthermore the axial field drops from 3 T to 0.4 T within the first 30 cm. The influence of the high magnetic field on the ion beam extraction and matching to the beam line is investigated. The extraction system is first simulated with the 2D ion trajectory code IGUN with an estimated mean charge state of the extracted ion beam. These results are then compared with the 2D code AXCEL-INP, which can simulate the extraction of ions with different charge states. Finally, the influence of the strong magnetic hexapole field is studied with the three dimensional ion optics code KOBRA. The introduced tool set can be used to optimize the extraction system of the super conducting ECR ion source.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Leitner, M.A.; Lyneis, C.M.; Taylor, C.E.; Wutte, D. & Xie, Z.Q.

The Effect of High-Resistance SnO2 on CdS/CdTe Device Performance

Description: In this paper, we have studied the effect of high-resistance SnO2 buffer layers, deposited by low-pressure chemical-vapor deposition, on CdS/CdTe device performance. Our results indicate that when CdS/CdTe devices have a very thin layer of CdS or no CdS at all, the i-SnO2 buffer layer helps to increase device efficiency. When the CdS layer is thicker than 600{angstrom}, the device performance is dominated by CdS thickness, not the i-SnO2 layer. If a very thin CdS layer is to be used to enhance device performance, we conclude that a better SnO2 buffer layer is needed.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Li, W.; Ribelin, R.; Mahathongdy, Y.; Albin, D.; Dhere, R.; Rose, D. et al.

The Effect of Laser Surface Reconstruction of Disordered Carbons on Performance

Description: The reconstruction of the surface of disordered carbons was examined by heating carbons derived from polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN) and divinylbenzene (DVB) with a pulsed infrared laser in an argon or helium atmosphere, both fluidized and under static conditions. By graphitizing the outer surface of the carbons, it was hoped to reduce the high first-cycle losses associated with such disordered materials in Li-ion cells. The power to the sample was varied to observed the effects on surface morphology and electrochemical performance in 1M LiPF{sub 6} ethylene carbonate-dimethyl carbonate. The use various reactive atmosphere such as ethylene, 2-vinylpyridine, pyrrole, and furfuryl alcohol were also evaluated as an alternative means of hopefully forming a thin graphitic layer on the carbon particles to reduce first-cycle irreversibility. While some improvement was realized, these losses were still unacceptably high. The laser heating did improve the rate capabilities of the carbons, however. More work in this area is necessary to fully understand surface and bulk effects.
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: EVEN JR., WILLIAM R. & GUIDOTTI, RONALD A.

Efficient Control Law Simulation for Multiple Mobile Robots

Description: In this paper we consider the problem of simulating simple control laws involving large numbers of mobile robots. Such simulation can be computationally prohibitive if the number of robots is large enough, say 1 million, due to the 0(N2 ) cost of each time step. This work therefore uses hierarchical tree-based methods for calculating the control law. These tree-based approaches have O(NlogN) cost per time step, thus allowing for efficient simulation involving a large number of robots. For concreteness, a decentralized control law which involves only the distance and bearing to the closest neighbor robot will be considered. The time to calculate the control law for each robot at each time step is demonstrated to be O(logN).
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Driessen, B. J.; Feddema, J. T.; Kotulski, J. D. & Kwok, K. S.

Field Balancing in the Real World: Part 2

Description: This paper is a follow-up to an earlier paper, Field Balancing in the Real World, which was presented at CSI Reliability Week 1997 in Nashville. Case studies of excessive vibrations on fans at ORNL will be discussed. Except for a few small sections from the earlier paper, this paper is entirely new. The case studies are new. As in the first paper, all fans are rigid-rotor type fans. Normal operation, therefore, is at less than the shaft's first critical speed. The presentation of case studies with root cause problems other than unbalance is a major departure from the first paper. We believe they belong here, since unbalance is suspected most of the time when a fan is vibrating excessively, even when it is not the root cause. In reality, unbalance is the underlying cause of the excess vibration on fans we have fixed at ORNL only about half the time. Furthermore, the analyst's credibility could be called into question upon an unsuccessful attempt at field balancing when underlying causes are later discovered and fixed. A demonstration will follow the case study presentation. The additional tests described in this paper to confirm centrifugal force (probable unbalance) will be performed.
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: Bracher, R.K. & Surrett, C.L.

Future algorithm research needs for partitioning in solid mechanics and coupled mechanical models

Description: Exceptional progress has been made in mathematical algorithm research leading to optimized mesh partitions for the highly unstructured grids occurring in finite element applications in solid mechanics. Today another research challenge presents itself. Research is needed to include boundary conditions into the algorithms for partitioning meshes. We describe below two methods we use currently to accomplish this and propose a more general approach be developed which would apply to our problems today as well as to the coupled models we envision for the future. Finally, we suggest research be considered that would incorporate partitioning methods into parallel mesh generation.
Date: October 6, 1997
Creator: Hoover, C. G.; DeGroot, A. J. & Sherwood, R. J.

Improved instrumentation for near-real-time measurement of reactive hydrocarbons, NO{sub 2}, and peroxyacyl nitrates.

Description: The measurement of reactive hydrocarbons and associated nitrogen oxides, NO{sub 2}, and peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) is of key importance to unraveling the complex chemistries involved in daytime photochemical oxidant formation and nighttime chemistry driven by the nitrate radical. Recent work has demonstrated that chemiluminescent reactions of ozone with hydrocarbons (and the temperature dependence of the reactions) can be used as a means of detecting a wide variety of organic compounds in the gas phase with sensitivity comparable to or better than that of the conventional flame ionization detection method (Marley and Gaffney, 1998). We have implemented a new design and built a new instrument to evaluate this approach for the monitoring of alkenes. This instrument makes use of a computer-controlled photon-counting system with a reaction chamber operated at room temperature. Signals are compared to those for an ethene standard to estimate relative reactivity. The instrument is described in detail here, along with a new version of a luminol-based chemiluminescence detection system with fast gas chromatography for measurement of NO{sub 2} and PANs. The photon-counting system, the reaction chamber, and the luminol detection system have been combined on one instrument rack for field use on both ground-based and aircraft platforms. Data presented show the response times of the instruments and indicate applications for examining reactive hydrocarbon emissions from both vegetation and anthropogenic sources. In addition, the luminol chemiluminescence instrument was field tested, and the data obtained are compared with data from a commercial NO{sub x} analyzer. Preliminary results demonstrating the potential use of this instrumentation for rapid measurement of key tropospheric trace species are presented and discussed.
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: Drayton, P. J.; Blazer, C. A.; Gaffney, J. S. & Marley, N. A.

Initial Design of the 60 Megawatt Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) Oscillator System for the University of Washington ''TCS'' Field Reversed Configuration Experiment

Description: This paper presents the initial electrical and mechanical design of two phase-locked 30 Megawatt RMS, 150 kHz oscillator systems used for current drive and plasma sustainment of the ''Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment'' (TCS) field reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. By the application of orthogonally-placed saddle coils on the surface of the glass vacuum vessel, the phase-controlled rotating magnetic field perturbation will induce an electric field in the plasma which should counter the intrinsic ohmic decay of the plasma, and maintain the FRC. Each system utilizes a bank of 6 parallel magnetically beamed ML8618 triodes. These devices are rated at 250 Amperes cathode current and a 45 kV plate voltage. An advantage of the magnetically beamed triode is their extreme efficiency, requiring only 2.5 kW of filament and a few amps and a few kV of grid drive. Each 3.5 uH saddle coil is configured with an adjustable tank circuit (for tuning). Assuming no losses and a nominal 18 kV plate voltage, the tubes can circulate about 30 kV and 9 kA (pk to pk) in the saddle coil antenna, a circulating power of over 33 megawatts RMS. On each cycle the tubes can kick in up to 1500 Amperes, providing a robust phase control. DC high-voltage from the tubes is isolated from the saddle coil antennas and tank circuits by a 1:1 coaxial air-core balun transformer. To control the ML8618's phase and amplitude, fast 150 Ampere ''totem-pole'' grid drivers, an ''on'' hot-deck and an ''off'' hot-deck are utilized. The hot-decks use up to 6 each 3CPX1500A7 slotted radial beam triodes. By adjusting the conduction angle, amplitude may be regulated, with inter-pulse timing, phase angle can be controlled. A central feedback timing chassis monitors each systems' saddle coil antenna and appropriately derives each systems timing signals. Fiber-optic cables are used to isolate ...
Date: October 6, 1997
Creator: Reass, W.A.; Miera, D.A. & Wurden, G.A.

Micro-Fluidic Diffusion Coefficient Measurement

Description: A new method for diffusion coefficient measurement applicable to micro-fluidics is pre- sented. The method Iltilizes an analytical model describing laminar dispersion in rect- anglllar ~llicro_channe]s. The Illethod ~vas verified throllgh measllremen~ of fllloresceill diffusivity in water and aqueolls polymer solutions of differing concentration. The diffll- sivity of flllorescein was measlmed as 0.64 x 10-gm2/s in water, 0.49 x 10-gm2/s in the 4 gm/dl dextran solution and 0.38 x 10-9n12/s in the 8 gnl/dl dextran solution.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Forster, F.K. & Galambos, P.

New Concepts for High-Intensity PV Modules for Use with Dish Concentrator Systems

Description: In this paper we report on our efforts to fabricate monolithically interconnected modules (MIMS) from GaAs device structures. The small size of the component cells comprising the MIM allows for operation at very high flux densities. This relaxes the requirement for a small spot-size to be generated by the optics. The devices are grown on semi-insulating substrates, allowing the incorporation of an extremely efficient back surface reflector (BSR). This BSR is an effective tool for thermal management of the array. The possibility of using this device configuration in conjunction with the large dish concentrators developed by the solar thermal community is examined. The advantages of using multijunction devices for this application is also discussed.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Ward, J. S.; Duda, A.; Coutts, T. J. & Kurtz, S. R.

New Materials for Future Generations of III-V Solar Cells

Description: Three- and four-junction III-V devices are proposed for ultrahigh-efficiency solar cells using a new 1-eV material lattice-matched to GaAs, namely, GaInNAs. We demonstrate working prototypes of a GaInNAs-based solar cell lattice-matched to GaAs with photoresponse down to 1 eV. Under the AM1.5 direct spectrum with all the light higher in energy than the GaAs band gap filtered out, the prototypes grown with base doping of about 10{sup 17} cm-3 have open-circuit voltages ranging from 0.35 to 0.44 V, short-circuit current densities of 1.8 mA/cm2, and fill factors from 61% to 66%. To improve on the current record-efficiency tandem GaInP/GaAs solar cell by adding a GaInNAs junction, the short-circuit current density of this 1-eV cell must be significantly increased. Because these low short-circuit current densities are due to short diffusion lengths, we have demonstrated a depletion-width-enhanced variation of one of the prototype devices that trades off decreased voltage for increased photocurrent, with a short-circuit current density of 7.4 mA/cm2 and an open-circuit voltage of 0.28 V.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; Olson, J. M.; Kramer, C.; Kibbler, A. & Kurtz, S. R.

New Opportunities in Crystalline Silicon R&D

Description: To support the expected growth of the silicon solar cell industry, we believe that research and development (R&D) activities should be carried out in the following areas: polysilicon feedstock for the PV industry; thin-layer silicon deposition methods, and more environmentally benign cell and module manufacturing processes. For each of these activities, we identify the main issues that needed to be addressed.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Tsuo, Y. S.; Wang, T. H.; Ciszek, T. F. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) & Menna, P. (ENEA, Portici, Italy)

Nova Experiments Examining Raleigh-Taylor Instability in Materials with Strength

Description: Material strength can affect the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid materials, where growth occurs through plastic flow. In order to study this effect at megabar pressures, we have shocked metal foils using hohlraum x-ray drive on Nova, and observed the growth of pre-imposed modulations with x-ray radiography. Previous experiments employing Cu foils did not conclusively show strength effects for resolvable wavelengths. Therefore, we have redesigned the experiment to use aluminum foils. As aluminum has higher specific strength at pressures {approx}1 Mbar, the new design is predicted to show growth reduction due to strength of at least a factor of two for some wavelengths in the observable range of 10 - 50 {micro}m. We have also modified the drive history to extend the interval of uniform acceleration and to reduce the risk of melting the foils with coalesced shocks. The design changes, as well as Nova operational constraints, limit peak pressures to 1-1.5 Mbar. Foil surface motion has been measured with high sensitivity by laser interferometry to look for thermal expansion due to preheat. We have continued to pursue dynamic x-ray diffraction as the most definitive measurement of crystal state.
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: Weber, S.V.; Kalantar, D.H.; Colvin, J.D.; Gold, D.M.; Mikaelian, K.O.; Remington, B.A. et al.

Operational Performance of the Two-Channel 10 Megawatt Feedback Amplifier System for MHD Control on the Columbia University HBT-EP Tokamak

Description: The operational characteristics and performance of the two channel 10 Megawatt MHD feedback control system as installed by Los Alamos National Laboratory on the Columbia University HBT-EP tokamak are described. In the present configuration, driving independent 300 {micro}H saddle coil sets, each channel can deliver 1100 Amperes and 16 kV peak to peak. Full power bandwidth is about 12 kHz, with capabilities at reduced power to 30 kHz. The present system topology is designed to suppress magnetohydrodynamic activity with m=2, n=1 symmetry. Application of either static (single phase) or rotating (twin phased) magnetic perturbations shows the ability to spin up or slow down the plasma, and also prevent (or cause) so-called ''mode-locking''. Open loop and active feedback experiments using a digital signal processor (DSP) have been performed on the HBT-EP tokamak and initial results show the ability to manipulate the plasma MHD mode frequency.
Date: October 6, 1997
Creator: Reass, W.A. & Wurden, G.A.

Precision fast kickers for kiloampere electron beams

Description: These kickers will be used to make fast dipoles and quadrupoles which are driven by sharp risetime pulsers to provide precision beam manipulations for high current kA electron beams. This technology will be used on the 2nd axis of the DARHT linac at LANL. It will be used to provide 4 micropulses of pulse width 20 to 120 nsec. selected from a 2 {micro}sec., 2kA, 20MeV macropulse. The fast pulsers will have amplitude modulation capability to compensate for beam-induced steering effects and other slow beam centroid motion to within the bandwidth of the kicker system. Scaling laws derived from theory will be presented along with extensive experimental data obtained on the test bed ETA-II.
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: Caporaso, G.J.; Chen, Y.J. & Weir, J.T.

Predictive Models for the Determination of Pitting Corrosion Versus Inhibitor Concentrations and Temperature for Radioactive Sludge in Carbon Steel Waste Tanks

Description: Statistical models have been developed to predict the occurrence of pitting corrosion in carbon steel waste storage tanks exposed to radioactive nuclear waste. The levels of nitrite concentrations necessary to inhibit pitting at various temperatures and nitrate concentrations were experimentally determined via electrochemical polarization and coupon immersion corrosion tests. Models for the pitting behavior were developed based on various statistical analyses of the experimental data. Feed-forward Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models, trained using the Back-Propagation of Error Algorithm, more accurately predicted conditions at which pitting occurred than the logistic regression models developed using the same data.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Mickalonis, J.I.

Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workwhop on RHIC spin

Description: This RHIC Spin Workshop is the 1999 annual meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration, and the second to be hosted at Brookhaven and sponsored by the RIKEN BNL Research Center. The previous meetings were at Brookhaven (1998), Marseille (1996), MIT in 1995, Argonne 1994, Tucson in 1991, and the Polarized Collider Workshop at Penn State in 1990. As noted last year, the Center provides a home for combined work on spin by theorists, experimenters, and accelerator physicists. This proceedings, as last year, is a compilation of 1 page summaries and 5 selected transparencies for each speaker. It is designed to be available soon after the workshop is completed. Speakers are welcome to include web or other references for additional material. The RHIC spin program and RHIC are rapidly becoming reality. RHIC has completed its first commissioning run, as described here by Steve Peggs. The first Siberian Snake for spin has been completed and is being installed in RHIC. A new polarized source from KEK and Triumf with over 1 milliampere of polarized H{sup minus} is being installed, described by Anatoli Zelenski. They have had a successful test of a new polarimeter for RHIC, described by Kazu Kurita and Haixin Huang. Spin commissioning is expected next spring (2000), and the first physics run for spin is anticipated for spring 2001. The purpose of the workshop is to get everyone together about once per year and discuss goals of the spin program, progress, problems, and new ideas. They also have many separate regular forums on spin. There are spin discussion sessions every Tuesday, now organized by Naohito Saito and Werner Vogelsang. The spin discussion schedule and copies of presentations are posted on http://riksg01.rhic.bnl.gov/rsc. Speakers and other spinners are encouraged to come to BNL and to lead a discussion on your favorite idea. ...
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: Soffer, J.