UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 4 Matching Results

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Chestnut Blight

Description: "Chestnut blight, caused by a fungus brought into this country from Asia before 1904, is responsible for the death of millions of acres of chestnut growth in New England and the Middle Atlantic States. The disease spread rapidly to nearly all parts of the range of the native chestnut, and the remaining stands of the southern Appalachians face certain destruction. The present known distribution, its symptoms, and the fungus that causes the disease are described. The blight fungus itself does not have any effect upon the strength of chestnut timber, and blight-killed trees can be utilized for poles, posts, cordwood, lumber, and extract wood. Search is being made for native and foreign chestnuts resistant to the disease in the hope of finding a tree suitable for replacing the rapidly disappearing stands. Seedlings of Asiatic chestnuts, which have considerable natural resistance even though not immune, are being tested in the United States." -- p. ii
Date: 1930
Creator: Gravatt, G. F. & Gill, L. S.

The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer

Description: Revised edition. This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. There are two generations in a season. As the second generation passes the winter in the corn roots, if the roots are destroyed or plowed, the pest will be largely subdued. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the borer. This bulletin gives the life history of the borer, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it." -- p. ii
Date: 1933
Creator: Ainslie, George G.

Soil Defense in the Northeast

Description: This bulletin discusses methods of soil conservation in the northeastern United States that can prevent erosion. Soil conservation practices vary with the type of agriculture being used. In addition to general farming, conservation for dairying, orcharding, market gardening, and single-crop farming are discussed.
Date: 1938
Creator: Rule, Glenn K. (Glenn Kenton), 1893-

Wildlife Conservation Through Erosion Control in the Piedmont

Description: "Erosion has left scars on a majority of farms in the Southeast. Too poor to produce crops, the eroding spots are usually abandoned. Unless they are treated to stop further washing of the soil they grow steadily larger and continually rob the farmer of more of his land. Fortunately, soil conservation and wildlife management can be effectively combined, and otherwise worthless areas made to produce a crop of game, fur bearers, and other desirable types of wildlife. The general principles of wildlife management on the farm are described in Farmers' Bulletins 1719 and 1759. The purpose of this bulletin is to show how gullies, terrace outlets, waterways, eroding field borders, pastures, and woodlands in the Piedmont region may be protected against erosion through the use of vegetation that will also provide food and cover for wildlife." -- p. ii
Date: 1937
Creator: Stevens, Ross O.