UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 4 Matching Results

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Adjusting Corn Belt Farming to Meet Corn-Borer Conditions

Description: "The European corn borer is recognized as a dangerous enemy of the corn crop.... Its eradication is considered economically impossible but it is believed that the injury may be kept at a point so low that little commercial damage will occur during normal seasons. This can be done by using control measures and practices that have proved to be effective.... On some farms some changes in the crops grown and in their sequence will aid materially in controlling the borer and may prove profitable even when borers are not present. The control program for the individual farm should be given consideration at once in order to avoid sudden disturbance of the organization and operation of the farm when control measures do become inevitable. The necessity of concerted effort by all producers in an infested district becomes evident when the life habits of the borer are considered." -- p. ii
Date: 1932
Creator: Kenneth Hayes Myers, 1898-

Implements and Methods of Tillage to Control Soil Blowing on the Northern Great Plains

Description: This bulletin tools and methods of tilling which can help reduce or control soil blowing and soil erosion on farms in the northern Great Plains of the United States. Among the crops discussed with relation to tilling methods are beans, corn, sorghum, potatoes, alfalfa, and sweet clover.
Date: 1938
Creator: Cole, John S. (John Selden) & Morgan, George W.

Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States

Description: "The information given in this bulletin should enable farmers in the Great Plains and Western States to select from the more common species of grasses some one or more suited to their needs [for soil and water conservation]. Common harvesting equipment and farm machinery can be adapted to the proper handling of native grasses. This brings the cost of such work within the means of most farmers." -- p. i. Among the grasses discussed are wheatgrass, buffalo grass, bluestem, grama, Bermuda grass, wild rye, hilaria, Sudan grass, bluegrass, panic grasses, dropseed, and needlegrass.
Date: 1939
Creator: Hoover, Max M. (Max Manley), 1895-

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Date: 1933
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-