UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 8 Matching Results

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Home Gardening in the South

Description: Revised edition. "A well-kept vegetable is a source not only of profit to the gardener but of pleasure to the entire family. For many vegetables which deteriorate rapidly in quality after being gathered, the only practicable means of securing the best is to grow them at home. This is especially true of garden peas, sweet corn, string beans, green Lima beans, and asparagus. The land utilized for, the farm garden, if well cared for, yields much larger returns than any area of similar size planted to the usual farm crops. A half-acre garden should produce as much in money value as 2 or 3 acres in general farm crops. In most sections of the South, though vegetables can be grown in nearly every month of the year, the garden is neglected; in fact, no feature of southern agriculture is more neglected than the production of vegetables for home use. In the following pages specific instructions are given for making a garden and caring for it throughout the season." -- p. 2
Date: 1931
Creator: Thompson, H. C. (Homer Columbus), b. 1885

The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer

Description: Revised edition. This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. There are two generations in a season. As the second generation passes the winter in the corn roots, if the roots are destroyed or plowed, the pest will be largely subdued. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the borer. This bulletin gives the life history of the borer, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it." -- p. ii
Date: 1933
Creator: Ainslie, George G.

Muscadine Grapes

Description: "Muscadine grapes are indigenous to the southeastern section of the United States, where they grow in greater or less profusion in the wild state. Through careful selection from the wild grapes and scientific breeding there have been developed a considerable number of varieties particularly adapted to the home needs in the Southeast, both as table grapes and as raw material for a variety of food and beverage products. Not being resistant to low winter temperatures they do not thrive in the northern grape districts. Muscadines are relatively resistant to grape diseases and insect pests and do well with a minimum of care, but, like most fruits, respond favorably to good cultural treatment. This bulletin sets forth in nontechnical form the information accumulated by the Department [of Agriculture] over a considerable period of years on muscadine grape varieties, their bleeding, culture, and uses." -- p. ii
Date: 1938
Creator: Dearing, Charles