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Abstracts pertaining to seaplanes

Description: About 400 references pertaining to the hydrodynamic design of seaplanes have been compiled, and the information is presented in the form of abstracts classified under six main headings.
Date: July 24, 1947
Creator: Bidwell, Jerold M & King, Douglas A
Item Type: Report

Acceleration Characteristics of R-3350 Engine Equipped with NACA Injection Impeller

Description: Qualitative investigations have shown that use of the NACA injection impeller with the R-3350 engine increases the inertia of the fuel-injection system and, when the standard fuel-metering system is used, this increase in inertia results in poor engine acceleration characteristics. This investigation was therefore undertaken to determine whether satisfactory acceleration characteristics of the engine equipped with the injection impeller could be obtained by simple modifications to the fuel-monitoring system. The engine was operated with two types of carburetor; namely, a hydraulic-metering carburetor incorporating a vacuum-operated accelerating pump and a direct-metering carburetor having a throttle-actuated accelerating pump. The vacuum-operated accelerating pump of the hydraulic-metering carburetor was modified to produce satisfactory accelerations by supplementing the standard air chamber with an additional 75-cubic spring. The throttle-actuated accelerating pump of the direct-metering carburetor was modified to produce satisfactory accelerations by replacing the standard 0.028-inch-diameter bleed in the load-compensator balance line with a smaller bleed of 0.0225-inch diameter. The results of this investigation indicated that both carburetors can be easily modified to produce satisfactory acceleration characteristics of the engine and no definite choice between the types of carburetor and accelerating pump can be made. Use of the direct-metering carburetor, however, probably resulted in better fuel distribution to the cylinders during the acceleration period and reduced the backfire hazard because all the fuel is introduced through the injection impeller.
Date: January 8, 1947
Creator: Hickel, Robert O. & Snider, William E.
Item Type: Report

Acceleration Measurements During Landing in Rough Water of a 1/7-Scale Dynamic Model of Grumman XJR2F-1 Amphibian - Langley Tank Model 212, TED No. NACA 2378

Description: Tests of a 1/7 size model of the Grumman XJR2F-1 amphibian were made in Langley tank no.1 to examine the landing behavior in rough water and to measure the normal and angular accelerations experienced by the model during these landings. All landings were made normal to the direction of wave advance, a condition assumed to produce the greatest accelerations. Wave heights of 4.4 and 8.0 inches (2.5 and 4.7 ft, full size) were used in the tests and the wave lengths were varied between 10 and 50 feet (70 and 350 ft, full size). Maximum normal accelerations of about 6.5g were obtained in 4.4 inch waves and 8.5g were obtained in 8.0 inch waves. A maximum angular acceleration corresponding to 16 radians per second per second, full size, was obtained in the higher waves. The data indicate that the airplane will experience its greatest accelerations when landing in waves of about 20 feet (140 ft, full size) in length.
Date: May 6, 1947
Creator: Land, Norman S. & Zeck, Howard
Item Type: Report

Acceleration Measurements During Landings of a 1/5.5-Size Dynamic Model of the Columbia XJL-1 Amphibian in Smooth Water and in Waves: Langley Tank Model 208M, TED No. NACA 2336

Description: A 1/5.5-size powered dynamic model of the Columbia XJL-1 amphibian was landed in Langley tank no. 1 in smooth water and in oncoming waves of heights from 2.1 feet to 6.4 feet (full-size) and lengths from 50 feet to 264 feet (full-size). The motions and the vertical accelerations of the model were continuously recorded. The greatest vertical acceleration measured during the smooth-water landings was 3.1g. During landings in rough water the greatest vertical acceleration measured was 15.4g, for a landing in 6.4-foot by 165-foot waves. The impact accelerations increased with increase in wave height and, in general, decreased with increase in wave length. During the landings in waves the model bounced into the air at stalled attitudes at speeds below flying speed. The model trimmed up to the mechanical trim stop (20 deg) during landings in waves of heights greater than 2.0 feet. Solid water came over the bow and damaged the propeller during one landing in 6.4-foot waves. The vertical acceleration coefficients at first impact from the tank tests of a 1/5.5-size model were in fair agreement with data obtained at the Langley impact basin during tests of a 1/2-size model of the hull.
Date: September 25, 1947
Creator: Clement, Eugene P. & Havens, Robert F.
Item Type: Report

Accuracy of airspeed measurements and flight calibration procedures

Description: The sources of error that may enter into the measurement of airspeed by pitot-static methods are reviewed in detail together with methods of flight calibration of airspeed installations. Special attention is given to the problem of accurate measurements of airspeed under conditions of high speed and maneuverability required of military airplanes. (author).
Date: 1948
Creator: Huston, Wilber B
Item Type: Report

Adaptor for measuring principal strains with Tuckerman strain gage

Description: An adapter is described which uses three Tuckerman optical strain gages to measure the displacement of the three vortices of an equilateral triangle along lines 120 degrees apart. These displacements are substituted in well-known equations in order to compute the magnitude and direction of the principal strains. Tests of the adaptor indicate that principal strains over a gage length of 1.42 inch may be measured with a systematic error not exceeding 4 percent and a mean observational error of the order of + or minus 0.000006. The maximum observed error in strain was of the order of 0.00006. The directions of principal strains for unidirectional stress were measured with the adaptor with an average error of the order of 1 degree.
Date: June 1943
Creator: Mcpherson, A E
Item Type: Report

The additional-mass effect of plates as determined by experiments

Description: The apparent increase in the inertia properties of a body moving in a fluid medium has been called the additional-mass effect. This report presents a resume of test procedures and results of experimental determinations of the additional-mass effect of flat plates. In addition to data obtained from various foreign sources and from a NACA investigation in 1933, the results of tests recently conducted by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics are included.
Date: 1941
Creator: Gracey, William
Item Type: Report