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BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT. June through August1963

Description: This report covers the following titles: (1) The Effects of 8-Methyl Lipoic Acid on the Evolution of Oxygen and Reduction of Carbon Dioxide during Photosynthesis; (2) Further {sup 14}C and {sup 15}N Tracer Studies of Amino Acid Synthesis during Photosynthesis by Chlorella Pyrenoidosa; (3) Two-Dimensional High Voltage, Low-Temperature Paper Electrophoresis of {sup 14}C-Labeled Products of Photosynthesis with {sup 14}CO{sub 2}; (4) A Search for Enzymic and Nonenzymic Reactions Between Thiamine Derivatives and Sugar Phosphates; (5) The Cytochrome Content of Purified Spinach Chloroplast Lamellae; (6) The Osmium Tetroxide Fixation of Chloroplast Lamellae; (7) Kinetics of Exoenzymes and Applications to the Determination of the Sequence of Nucleic Acids; (8) Brain Biochemistry and Behavior in Rats; (9) Experiments on Classical Conditioning and Light Habituation in Planarians; (10) Operant Conditioning in Planarians; (11) Manganese Porphyrin Complexes; (12) EPR Studies of Some Complex Organic Solutions; (13) Transient Response of Light-induced Photosynthetic Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Signals: Rhodospirillum rubrum Chromatophores; (14) Studies of the Tautomerism of Amides; (15) Structure and Mechanism of Hydrolysis of the Product of Reaction of PZ05 and Ethyl Ether; (16) A Study of the Irradiation Products of Several Nitrones; (17) Biosynthesis of the Opium Alkaloids; (18) Synthesis of methyl-{beta}-D-thiogalactoside-{sup 35}S; (19) Effect of Acridine Orange and Visible Light on Thymine Dimer Formation and Disruption; (20) Some Aspects of the Radiation Chemistry of DNA; (21) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; and (22) Studies on the Inhibition of the Photoreduction of FMN.
Date: October 2, 1963
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Calculations of the surface heat flux and fuel temperatures for PRTR MK-I PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} fuel element with segregated PuO{sub 2}

Description: The methods used to fabricate the present loading of PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} fuel elements for the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor have resulted in alternating bands of high and low PuO{sub 2} concentration along each rod of the 19-rod elements. These bands are repeated every 1/2 or 1 inch along the length of the rod, depending on whether the loading of the oxides was done in 160 or 80 increments. This non-uniform distribution of PuO{sub 2} results in alternate regions of high and low heat generation rates with a direct influence on surface heat flux and fuel temperatures. Calculations were performed to determine the local surface heat fluxes and fuel temperatures in a rod of a PRTR 19-rod cluster PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} fuel element. The results indicated that peak to average flux ratios of 2.37 could occur for fuel rods loaded in 80 increments (1 inch total band length) if no mixing of the PuO{sub 2}-bearing powder occurs with the UO{sub 2} powder. This would result in maximum heat flux of 660,000 Btu/hr-sq ft for a fuel element operating at a tube power of 1,200 KW. For a rod loaded in 160 increments (1/2 inch total band length), the peak heat flux ratio was calculated to be 1.35 (475,000 Btu/hr-sq ft for a 1,200 KW fuel element). These heat flux ratios as well as fuel temperatures are shown in Figures 1 through 4 for two different values of maximum PuO{sub 2} concentration.
Date: January 2, 1963
Creator: Zaloudek, F. R. & Hesson, G. M.
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Contraction of graphite: A comparison of laboratory and production reactor data, Part 2, KE and KW Reactors

Description: Part 1 of this two-part report presented a comparison of the irradiation-induced contraction rates obtained on standard-size graphite samples and the apparent moderator contraction rates of H, DR and C Reactors. The distortion trends of the top center of the graphite stacks, from which the apparent moderator contraction rates were derived, were presented as a function of cumulative power generation since start-up for each of the six older Hanford reactors. Since KE and KW Reactors are of identical construction, different in many details from the six older reactors, and have been operated under similar conditions, the data from KE and KW are treated as if from one reactor. As in Part 1, contraction rates apply to measurements made transverse to the extrusion axis of the bars. As used in this report, the depression rates refer to the rate of reduction in height of the top center of the reactor moderators. This depression rate is the net effect of contraction and expansion of the graphite bars. The depression rate is used to calculate the contraction rate of the individual bars. The contraction rates derived from the reactor data are compared with contraction rates of small samples of the same graphite (TSGBF) as was used in the core of the K Reactors.
Date: January 2, 1963
Creator: Giberson, R. C. & Morgan, W. C.
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[Delta]I = 1/2 Rule for Non-Leptonic Strangeness-Changing Decay Processes

Description: Gell-Mann and Pais were the first to suggest that the non-leptonic decay processes of strange particles may be subject to an isospin selection rule, allowing only those decay transitions which involve a change [delta]I = 1/2 in to total isopin of the system. At present, however, there is really no theoretical framework for the description of weak interactions into which this selection rule fits in a natural and compelling way. The report includes sections on the 91) decay processes of the [caret] hyperon, (2) decay processes, (3) [complex conjugate] decay processes, and (6) K[pi]3 decay processes. We have considered the evidence on all of the known non-leeptonic non-radiative decay modes of strange particles. All of this evidence is in good qualitative accord with the [delta]I = 1/2 selection rule.
Date: December 2, 1963
Creator: Dalitz, R. H. (Richard Henry), 1925-2006.
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Distribution of time between unscheduled outages

Description: A study is in progress in which reactor operations will be simulated on the computer, the primary purpose being to evaluate the costs associated with various administrative alternatives which may be followed in conducting the overall operation, in addition to defining how operational costs are affected by such things as changes in fuel quality. The problem is complicated by the fact that the operation of the reactors is largely affected by random occurrences; no one can predict exactly when a tube will leak, or when a rupture will occur. Therefore, basic to the study is a probabilistic function, or set of functions, which govern the random aspects of reactor outages, and which can be used in the simulation study to generate reactor outages. This report is concerned with the derivation of such probabilistic functions. Although derived specifically for the simulation study, they are deemed of sufficient interest to warrant a separate report. Similar documents will be issued from time to time as the study progresses, and as results are found which are considered worthy of reporting prior to completion of the study.
Date: January 2, 1963
Creator: Jaech, J. L. & Burke, R. C.
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IPD reactor training text, declassified supplement: Chapter 2, Design and construction of the Hanford production reactors

Description: Purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of reactor construction and an understanding of important design considerations: how it is built, why it was built that way, what it is supposed to do, what the nuclear safety considerations are, and what one needs to know about its design/construction to properly operate it.
Date: July 2, 1963
Creator: Wade, G. E.
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Operating limits, Hanford Production Reactors. Revision 3

Description: These operating limits are applicable to eight operating production reactors, B, C, D, DR, F, H, KE, and KW. Subjects covered are: operating parameter limitations; reactivity limitations; control and safety systems; reactor fuel loadings; coolant requirements with irradiated fuel in reactor; reactor confinement; test facilities; code compliance; safety instrumentation and set points; and control criteria. Also discussed are the administrative procedures for process control, operator certification, audits and inspection, and reports and records.
Date: August 2, 1963
Creator: Owsley, G. F.
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Provisional specifications for prototypical lithium-aluminum target element 05T

Description: The 04T lithium-aluminum target elements that were irradiated at Hanford during the early part of 1963 indicated that a longer element would be more desirable from the standpoint of tritium production. The Production Fuels Sections was requested in late August, 1963, to manufacture a test load of ``O`` size elements that would be five inches in length. This document presents the manufacturing information that is necessary to make a finished target element five inches in length that will approximate the ``O`` size geomery with the existing supply of AlSi type aluminum components.
Date: September 2, 1963
Creator: Wick, J. J. Jr.
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Two-Phase Pressure Losses Quarterly Progress Report: Seventh Quarter, August 12, 1963 - November 11, 1963

Description: Technical report describing that the pressure drop along an annular channel with dimensions D(1) = 0.375 inch; D(2) = 0.875 inch, L = 70 inches. Flow was vertical and upward, and only the internal surface was heated. Subcooled conditions existed at the inlet, with two-phase conditions at the exit. Groups of three radial spacer pins on 18-inch centers along the channel, held the inner surface concentric with the outer surface. The single phase loss coefficient for each spacer group is K(8) = 0.21. The single phase friction factor for the annual channel is given by f = 0.16 N(R)(-0.16). The two phase pressure drop increases as the quality increases for G [over] 10(6) = 0.5 ;b/hr ft(2). The effect of heat flux on the pressure drop is very is very slight over the range of fluxes tested (0.55 less than or equal to Q over 10(6).\ less than or equal to 0.8). The two-phase pressure drop gradient in the same annulus, with no heat addition is qualitatively the same as for a 1/4-inch by 1-3/4 inches rectangular channel but is quantitatively greater than for the rectangular channel.
Date: December 2, 1963
Creator: Janssen, E. (Engineer) & Kervinen, J. A.
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