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Application of the methods of gas dynamics to water flows with free surface I : flows with no energy dissipation

Description: The application is treated in sufficient detail to facilitate as much as possible its application by the engineer who is less familiar with the subject. The present work was undertaken with two objects in view. In the first place, it is considered as a contribution to the water analogy of gas flows, and secondly, a large portion is devoted to the general theory of the two-dimensional supersonic flows.
Date: March 1940
Creator: Preiswerk, Ernst

Application of the methods of gas dynamics to water flows with free surface II : flows with momentum discontinuities (hydraulic jumps)

Description: In this paper an introduction to shock polar diagrams is given which then leads into an examination of water depths in hydraulic jumps. Energy loss during these jumps is considered along with an extended look at elementary solutions of flow. An experimental test set-up is described and the results presented.
Date: March 1940
Creator: Preiswerk, Ernst

An Investigation of the Prevention of Ice on the Airplane Windshield

Description: An investigation of three methods for the prevention and the removal of ice on an airplane windshield has been completed. The methods were: electric heating; hot-air heating; and an alcohol-dispensing, rotating wiper blade. The results showed that vision through the airplane windshield could be maintained during severe icing conditions by the use of heat. When put in operation prior to the formation of ice on the windshield the rotating wiper blade prevented the formation of ice. A combination of heated air and a rotating wiper blade would appear to protect against formation of ice on the windshield exterior, to prevent frost on the interior and to provide for the removal of rainfall.
Date: March 1, 1940
Creator: Rodert, Lewis A

Measurement of knock characteristics in spark-ignition engines

Description: This paper presents a discussion of three potential sources of error in recording engine knocking which are: the natural oscillation of the membrane, the shock process between test contacts, and the danger of burned contacts. Following this discussion, the paper calls attention to various results which make the bouncing-pin indicator appear fundamentally unsuitable for recording knock phenomena.
Date: March 1, 1940
Creator: Schutz, R

The shock-absorbed system of the airplane landing gear

Description: A discussion is given of the behavior of the shock-absorbing system, consisting of elastic struts and tires, under landing, take-off, and taxying conditions, and a general formula derived for obtaining the minimum stroke required to satisfy the conditions imposed on the landing gear. Finally, the operation of some typical shock-absorbing systems are examined and the necessity brought out for taking into account, in dynamic landing-gear tests, the effect of the wing lift at the instant of contact with the ground.
Date: March 1, 1940
Creator: Callerio, Pietro

Wind-tunnel investigation of an NACA 23030 airfoil with various arrangements of slotted flaps

Description: AN investigation was made of a large-chord NACA 23030 airfoil with a 40- and a 25.66 percent-chord slotted flap to determine the section aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil affected by flap chord, slot shape, flap position, and flap deflection. The flap positions for maximum lift, the position for minimum drag at moderate and high lift coefficients, and the complete section aerodynamic characteristics of selected optimum arrangements are given. Envelope polar of various flap arrangements are included. The relative merits of slotted flaps of different chords on the NACA 23030 airfoil are discussed, and a comparison is made of each flap size with a corresponding flap size on the NACA 23021 and 23012 airfoils. The lowest profile drags at moderate lift coefficients were obtained with an easy entrance to the slot. The 25.66-percent-chord slotted flap gave lower drag than the 40-percent-chord flap for lift coefficients less than 1.8, but the 40-percent-chord flap gave considerably lower drag for lift coefficients. The drag coefficients at moderate and high lift coefficients were greater with both sizes of flap on the NACA 23030 airfoil than on either the NACA 23021 or the NACA 23012 airfoil. The maximum lift coefficient for the deflections tested with either flap was practically independent of airfoil.
Date: March 1, 1940
Creator: Recant, I G