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Investigation of Efficiency Improvements During CO2 Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Progress Report

Description: The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificial fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in HFR and NFR that eventually result in less efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. This report provides results of the second semi-annual technical progress report that consists of three different topics. In the first topic, laboratory experiments were performed on a Berea core to investigate the changes in rock properties and fluid flow under different stress-state conditions. A comparative study of different stress conditions was also conducted to analyze the effect of the various loading systems. The experimental results show that fracture permeability reduces significantly as the stress increases compared to matrix permeability. The hydrostatic and triaxial stresses have greater impacts on permeability reduction compared to applying stress in the uniaxial stress condition. Fracture flow dominates when the applied stress is less, however, the matrix flow rate increases as applied stress increases and dominates at high stress even if the fracture does not heal completely. In the second topic, the preliminary results of static imbibition experiments are presented as a precursor to image the saturation profiles using X-Ray CT scanner. The static and dynamic imbibition experiments have been done previously (Schechter et al, 2002). The imaging of imbibition experiment is underway to track the saturation profiles using X-ray CT scanner. Hence, no more conclusions are drawn from this study at this time. In the last topic, the modeling of fluid flow through a single fracture incorporating the effect of surface roughness is conducted. Fracture permeability is usually estimated by a cubic law that is based on the theory of hydrodynamics for the laminar flow between flat plates. However, the cubic law is too simple to estimate the fracture permeability correctly, ...
Date: October 30, 2002
Creator: Schechter, David S.

Investigation of Efficiency Improvements During CO2 Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Progress Report

Description: This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Investigating of Efficiency Improvements during CO{sub 2} Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs.'' The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificial fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in HFR and NFR that eventually result in less efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on modeling the fluid flow in fracture surface, examining the fluid transfer mechanisms and describing the fracture aperture distribution under different overburden pressure using X-ray CT scanner.
Date: October 2003
Creator: Schechter, David S.

Investigation of Efficiency Improvements During CO2 Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Progress Report

Description: For many years many efforts have been performed in the laboratory experiments to duplicate the reservoir conditions. In this study, we will investigate the permeability change at different overburden conditions. The reduction in permeability with overburden pressure has been well known. Fatt and Davis (1952) presented the changes in permeability with pressure at range 0 to 15,000 psig and found that overburden pressure caused a reduction in permeability of the consolidated oil-bearing sandstone samples by as much as 50% at 10,000 psig. Wyble (1958) performed similar experiments on three different sandstone samples to determine the changes in conductivity, porosity and permeability at pressure range 0 to 5,000 psig. His results were consistent with the observation by Fatt and Davis (1952). During the experiments, different overburden pressures (radial force) were applied only to the cylinder core while the axial direction was kept at constant atmospheric pressure. Gray et al. (1963) enhanced the previous experiments by applying axial force and combining with overburden pressure (radial force) to measure the anisotropy permeability changes at more representative reservoir stress-state condition. They showed that permeability reduction subjected to overburden pressure as a function of the ratio of radial to axial stress and the permeability reduction under non-uniform stress (radial pressure {ne} axial pressure) is less than that under uniform stress. Although extensive work has been established on the effect of overburden pressure and stress-state on matrix permeability but there are some very interesting details of fractured rock behavior under stress that have not been investigated. In this study we will show the effect of fracture aperture and fracture permeability on the fluid flow under different overburden pressure. This study is a precursor to investigating fracture apertures under different stress-state conditions (confining stress, hydrostatic stress and triaxial stress) and imaging fracture aperture distributions using X-ray CT.
Date: April 2002
Creator: Schechter, David S.

Investigation of Efficiency Improvements During CO2 Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Progress Report

Description: This report describes the work performed during the fourth year of the project, ''Investigating of Efficiency Improvements during CO{sub 2} Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs.'' The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificially fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT scanner to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in hydraulically fractured reservoirs (HFR) and naturally fractured reservoirs (NFR) that eventually result in more efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. In Chapter 1, we worked with DOE-RMOTC to investigate fracture properties in the Tensleep Formation at Teapot Dome Naval Reserve as part of their CO{sub 2} sequestration project. In Chapter 2, we continue our investigation to determine the primary oil recovery mechanism in a short vertically fractured core. Finally in Chapter 3, we report our numerical modeling efforts to develop compositional simulator with irregular grid blocks.
Date: April 27, 2005
Creator: Schechter, David S.

Investigation of Efficiency Improvements During CO2 Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Progress Report

Description: The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificial fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in HFR and NFR that eventually result in less efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. This report provides results of the third semi-annual technical progress report that consists of application of X-Ray Tomography results to validate our numerical modeling of flow in fractures. Spontaneous imbibition plays a very important role in the displacement mechanism of non-wetting fluid in naturally fractured reservoirs. To quantify this spontaneous imbibition process, we developed a 2D two-phase numerical model. This numerical model was developed because an available commercial simulator cannot be used to model small-scale experiments with different boundary conditions. In building the numerical model, we started with the basic equation of fluid flow and developed a numerical approach of solving the non-linear diffusion saturation equation. We compared our numerical model with the analytical solution of this equation to ascertain the limitations of the assumptions used to arrive at that solution. The unique aspect of this paper is that we validated our model with X-ray computerized tomography (CT) experimental data from a different spontaneous imbibition experiment, where two simultaneously varying parameters of weight gain and CT water saturation were used. This requires us to undertake extensive sensitivity studies on key parameters before a successful match could be obtained. We also successfully captured our own X-ray computerized tomography (CT) laboratory experiment on a fractured core.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Schechter, David S.

Investigation of Efficiency Improvements During CO2 Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Progress Report

Description: This report describes the work performed during the third year of the project, ''Investigating of Efficiency Improvements during CO{sub 2} Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs.'' The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificial fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in HFR and NFR that eventually result in more efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on modeling fluid flow through rough fractures and investigating the grid orientation effect in rectangular grid blocks particularly at high mobility ratio as our precursor to use a compositional simulator. We are developing a robust simulator using Voronoi grids to accurately represent natural and induced fractures. We are also verifying the accuracy of the simulation using scaled laboratory experiments to provide a benchmark for our simulation technique. No such simulator currently exists so this capability will represent a major breakthrough in simulation of gas injection in fractured systems. The following sections outline the results that appear in this report.
Date: October 10, 2004
Creator: Schechter, David S.

Investigation of Efficiency Improvements During CO2 Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Progress Report

Description: This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Investigating of Efficiency Improvements during CO{sub 2} Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs.'' The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificial fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in HFR and NFR that eventually result in less efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on investigating the effect of CO{sub 2} injection rates in homogeneous and fractured cores on oil recovery and a strategy to mitigate CO{sub 2} bypassing in a fractured core.
Date: April 26, 2004
Creator: Schechter, David S.