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U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Plan: 2000

Description: The Department of Energy conducts programs relating to energy resources, national nuclear security, environmental quality, and science. In each of these areas, the US is facing significant challenges. Our economic well-being depends on the continuing availability of reliable and affordable supplies of clean energy. Our Nation's security is threatened by the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Our environment is under threat from the demands a more populated planet and the legacies of 20th-century activities. Science and the technology derived from it offer the promise to improve the Nation's health and well-being and broadly expand human knowledge. In conducting its programs, the Department of Energy (DOE) employs unique scientific and technical assets, including 30,000 scientists, engineers, and other technical staff, in a complex of outstanding national laboratories that have a capital value of over $45 billion. Through its multidisciplinary research and development activities and its formidable assemblage of scientific and engineering talent, DOE focuses its efforts on four programmatic business lines: (1) Energy Resources--promoting the development and deployment of systems and practices that provide energy that is clean, efficient, reasonably priced, and reliable. (2) National Nuclear Security--enhancing national security through military application of nuclear technology and by reducing global danger from the potential spread of weapons of mass destruction. (3) Environmental Quality--cleaning up the legacy of nuclear weapons and nuclear research activities, safely managing nuclear materials, and disposing of radioactive wastes. (4) Science--advancing science and scientific tools to provide the foundation for DOE's applied missions and to provide remarkable insights into our physical and biological world. In support of the above four business lines, DOE provides management services to ensure that the technical programs can run efficiently. Our Corporate Management area deals with organizational and management challenges that we must address to better serve our customers, and ultimately, U.S. taxpayers, …
Date: September 1, 2000
open access

Relationship of Course Woody Debris to Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Prey Diversity and Abundance

Description: The abundance of diversity of prey commonly used by the red-cockaded woodpecker were monitored in experimental plots in which course woody debris was manipulated. In one treatment, all the woody debris over four inches was removed. In the second treatment, the natural amount of mortality remained intact. The overall diversity of prey was unaffected; however, wood roaches were significantly reduced by removal of woody debris. The latter suggests that intensive utilizations or harvesting practices may reduce foraging.
Date: September 3, 1999
Creator: Horn, G.S.
open access

ELECTROMOTIVE FORCE, EMF (CELLS)

Description: The voltage or electric potential difference across the terminals of a cell when no current is drawn from it. The emf of a cell is the sum of the electric potential differences (PDs) produced by a separation of charges (electrons or ions) that can occur at each phase boundary (or interface) in the cell. The magnitude of each PD depends on the chemical nature of the two contacting phases. Thus, at the interface between two different metals, some electrons will have moved from the metal with a higher free energy of electrons to the metal with a lower free energy of electrons. The resultant charge separation will produce a PD (just as charge separation produces a voltage across a capacitor) that, at equilibrium, exactly opposes further electron flow. Similarly, PDs can be produced when electrons partition across a metal/solution interface or metal/solid interface, and when ions partition across a solution/membrane/solution interface.
Date: September 16, 1998
Creator: Archer, M. D. & Feldberg, S. W.
open access

High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

Description: The overall objective of this program was to develop improved extended oxygen delignification (EOD) technologies for current U.S. pulp mill operations. This was accomplished by: (1) Identifying pulping conditions that optimize O and OO performance; (2) Identifying structural features of lignin that enhance reactivity towards EOD of high kappa pulps; (3) Identifying factors minimizing carbohydrate degradation and improve pulp strength of EOD high kappa pulps; (4) Developing a simple, reproducible method of quantifying yield gains from EOD; and (5) Developing process conditions that significantly reduce the capital requirements of EOD while optimizing the yield benefits. Key research outcomes included, demonstrating the use of a mini-O sequence such as (E+O)Dkf:0.05(E+O) or Dkf:0.05(E+O)(E+O) without interstage washing could capture approximately 60% of the delignification efficiency of a conventional O-stage without the major capital requirements associated with an O-stage for conventional SW kraft pulps. The rate of formation and loss of fiber charge during an O-stage stage can be employed to maximize net fiber charge. Optimal fiber charge development and delignification are two independent parameters and do not parallel each other. It is possible to utilize an O-stage to enhance overall cellulosic fiber charge of low and high kappa SW kraft pulps which is beneficial for physical strength properties. The application of NIR and multi-variant analysis was developed into a rapid and simple method of determining the yield of pulp from an oxygen delignification stage that has real-world mill applications. A focus point of this program was the demonstration that Kraft pulping conditions and oxygen delignification of high and low-kappa SW and HW pulps are intimately related. Improved physical pulp properties and yield can be delivered by controlling the H-factor and active alkali charge. Low AA softwood kraft pulp with a kappa number 30 has an average improvement of 2% in yield and 4 …
Date: September 30, 2005
Creator: Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Lucia, Lucian A. & Jameel, Hasan
open access

Process for Generation of Hydrogen Gas from Various Feedstocks Using Thermophilic Bacteria

Description: A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45 degrees C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.
Date: September 13, 2005
Creator: Ooteghem Van, Suellen
open access

Feds Pitch In, Test Load Reduction in California

Description: This brochure, part of the SEP Stellar Projects series, covers a federal load reduction test in California in May 2001. The purpose of the test was to quantify the amount of short-term reduction in power requirements could be achieved in the event of an emergency. With California electricity providers stretched to their limits last winter and spring, the California Energy Commission (CEC) wanted to test its new Automated Emergency Response System in the event of an electricity supply emergency. The system is designed to communicate with 1,000 city, county, and special districts in the event of an imminent (Stage 2 or Stage 3) emergency. CEC also wanted to see what federal and state facilities managers might contribute in conservation and energy efficiency measures. California has a large number of state and federal facilities, and their combined electricity demand is significant. The U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) offered to coordinate the federal agencies participating in the voluntary CEC test to see how much they could reduce electricity demand between 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on May 24. Altogether, the test involved than 190 people from 115 facilities working for 20 different federal agencies.
Date: September 1, 2001
open access

Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution

Description: A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in 1998 heats water for the prison and costs less than buying electricity to heat that water. This renewable energy system provides 70% of the facility's annual hot water needs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons did not incur the up-front cost of this system because it was financed through an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). The ESPC payments are 10% less than the energy savings so that the prison saves an average of$6,700 per year, providing an immediate payback. The solar hot water system produces up to 50,000 gallons of hot water daily, enough to meet the needs of 1,250 inmates and staff who use the kitchen, shower, and laundry facilities.
Date: September 1, 2004
open access

Alcoa: Plant-Wide Energy Assessment Finds Potential Savings at Aluminum Extrusion Facility. Industrial Technologies Program, Aluminum BestPractices Plant-Wide Assessment Case Study.

Description: Alcoa completed an energy assessment of its Engineered Products aluminum extrusion facility in Plant City, Florida, in 2001. The company identified energy conservation opportunities throughout the plant and prepared a report as an example for performing energy assessments at similar Alcoa facilities. If implemented, the cost of energy for the plant would be reduced by more than$800,000 per year by conserving 3 million kWh of electricity and 150,000 MMBtu of natural gas.
Date: September 1, 2003
open access

Technology Brief: Analysis of Current-Day Commercial Electrolyzers

Description: This factsheet provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production technologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003. The operating specifications and hydrogen production costs of commercially available electrolyzers from five manufacturers, i.e., Stuart, Teledyne, Proton, Norsk Hydro, and Avalence, are compared.
Date: September 1, 2004
open access

Green Roofs: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Federal Technology Alert

Description: In a ''green roof,'' a layer of vegetation (e.g., a roof garden) covers the surface of a roof to provide shade, cooler indoor and outdoor temperatures, and effective storm-water management to reduce runoff. The main components are waterproofing, soil, and plants. There are two basic kinds: intensive and extensive. An intensive green roof often features large shrubs and trees, and it can be expensive to install and maintain. An extensive green roof features shallow soil and low-growing, horizontally spreading plants that can thrive in the alpine conditions of many rooftops. These plants do not require a lot of water or soil, and they can tolerate a significant amount of exposure to the sun and wind. This Federal Technology Alert focuses on the benefits, design, and implementation of extensive green roofs and includes criteria for their use on federal facilities.
Date: September 1, 2004
Creator: Scholz-Barth, K. & Tanner, S.
open access

Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report

Description: This report provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production technologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003. The operating specifications of commercially available electrolyzers from five manufacturers, i.e., Stuart, Teledyne, Proton, Norsk Hydro, and Avalence, are summarized. Detailed economic analyses of three systems for which cost and economic data were available were completed. The contributions of the cost of electricity, system efficiency, and capital costs to the total cost of electrolysis are discussed.
Date: September 1, 2004
Creator: Ivy, J.
open access

Titanium-Alloy Power Capacitor: High-Power Titanate Capacitor for Power Electronics

Description: ADEPT Project: There is a constant demand for better performing, more compact, lighter weight, and lower cost electronic devices. Unfortunately, the materials traditionally used to make components for electronic devices have reached their limits. Case Western is developing capacitors made of new materials that could be used to produce the next generation of compact and efficient high-powered consumer electronics and electronic vehicles. A capacitor is an important component of an electronic device. It stores an electric charge and then discharges it into an electrical circuit in the device. Case Western is creating its capacitors from titanium, an abundant material extracted from ore which can be found in the U.S. Case Western's capacitors store electric charges on the surfaces of films, which are grown on a titanium alloy electrode that is formed as a spinal column with attached branches. The new material and spine design make the capacitor smaller and lighter than traditional capacitors, and they enable the component to store 300% more energy than capacitors of the same weight made of tantalum, the current industry standard. Case Western's titanium-alloy capacitors also spontaneously self-repair, which prolongs their life.
Date: September 1, 2010
open access

Illinois State Geological Survey Evaluation of CO2 Capture Options from Ethanol Plants

Description: The Illinois State Geological Survey and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium are conducting CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced oil recovery testing at six different sites in the Illinois Basin. The capital and operating costs for equipment to capture and liquefy CO{sub 2} from ethanol plants in the Illinois area were evaluated so that ethanol plants could be considered as an alternate source for CO{sub 2} in the event that successful enhanced oil recovery tests create the need for additional sources of CO{sub 2} in the area. Estimated equipment and operating costs needed to capture and liquefy 68 metric tonnes/day (75 tons/day) and 272 tonnes/day (300 tons/day) of CO{sub 2} for truck delivery from an ethanol plant are provided. Estimated costs are provided for food/beverage grade CO{sub 2} and also for less purified CO{sub 2} suitable for enhanced oil recovery or sequestration. The report includes preliminary plant and equipment designs and estimates major capital and operating costs for each of the recovery options. Availability of used equipment was assessed.
Date: September 30, 2006
Creator: Finley, Robert
open access

Utility-Scale Silicon Carbide Semiconductor: Monolithic Silicon Carbide Anode Switched Thyristor for Medium Voltage Power Conversion

Description: ADEPT Project: GeneSiC is developing an advanced silicon-carbide (SiC)-based semiconductor called an anode-switched thyristor. This low-cost, compact SiC semiconductor conducts higher levels of electrical energy with better precision than traditional silicon semiconductors. This efficiency will enable a dramatic reduction in the size, weight, and volume of the power converters and electronic devices it's used in.GeneSiC is developing its SiC-based semiconductor for utility-scale power converters. Traditional silicon semiconductors can't process the high voltages that utility-scale power distribution requires, and they must be stacked in complicated circuits that require bulky insulation and cooling hardware. GeneSiC's semiconductors are well suited for high-power applications like large-scale renewable wind and solar energy installations.
Date: September 1, 2010
open access

Soluble Lead Flow Battery: Soluble Lead Flow Battery Technology

Description: GRIDS Project: General Atomics is developing a flow battery technology based on chemistry similar to that used in the traditional lead-acid battery found in nearly every car on the road today. Flow batteries store energy in chemicals that are held in tanks outside the battery. When the energy is needed, the chemicals are pumped through the battery. Using the same basic chemistry as a traditional battery but storing its energy outside of the cell allows for the use of very low cost materials. The goal is to develop a system that is far more durable than today’s lead-acid batteries, can be scaled to deliver megawatts of power, and which lowers the cost of energy storage below $100 per kilowatt hour.
Date: September 1, 2010
open access

Utility-Scale Power Router: Dynamic Control of Grid Assets Using Direct AC Converter Cells

Description: ADEPT Project: Georgia Tech is developing a cost-effective, utility-scale power router that uses an enhanced transformer to more efficiently direct power on the grid. Existing power routing technologies are too expensive for widespread use, but the ability to route grid power to match real-time demand and power outages would significantly reduce energy costs for utilities, municipalities, and consumers. Georgia Tech is adding a power converter to an existing grid transformer to better control power flows at about 1/10th the cost of existing power routing solutions. Transformers convert the high-voltage electricity that is transmitted through the grid into the low-voltage electricity that is used by homes and businesses. The added converter uses fewer steps to convert some types of power and eliminates unnecessary power storage, among other improvements. The enhanced transformer is more efficient, and it would still work even if the converter fails, ensuring grid reliability.
Date: September 1, 2010
open access

Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage Project Topical Report: Preliminary Public Design Report

Description: This Preliminary Public Design Report consolidates for public use nonproprietary design information on the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture & Storage project. The report is based on the preliminary design information developed during the Phase I - Project Definition Phase, spanning the time period of February 1, 2010 through September 30, 2011. The report includes descriptions and/or discussions for: (1) DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, overall project & Phase I objectives, and the historical evolution of DOE and American Electric Power (AEP) sponsored projects leading to the current project; (2) Alstom's Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP) carbon capture retrofit technology and the carbon storage and monitoring system; (3) AEP's retrofit approach in terms of plant operational and integration philosophy; (4) The process island equipment and balance of plant systems for the CAP technology; (5) The carbon storage system, addressing injection wells, monitoring wells, system monitoring and controls logic philosophy; (6) Overall project estimate that includes the overnight cost estimate, cost escalation for future year expenditures, and major project risks that factored into the development of the risk based contingency; and (7) AEP's decision to suspend further work on the project at the end of Phase I, notwithstanding its assessment that the Alstom CAP technology is ready for commercial demonstration at the intended scale.
Date: September 30, 2011
Creator: Cerimele, Guy
open access

Voltage Regulator Chip: Power Supplies on a Chip

Description: ADEPT Project: CPES at Virginia Tech is finding ways to save real estate on a computer's motherboard that could be used for other critical functions. Every computer processor today contains a voltage regulator that automatically maintains a constant level of electricity entering the device. These regulators contain bulky components and take up about 30% of a computer's motherboard. CPES at Virginia Tech is developing a voltage regulator that uses semiconductors made of gallium nitride on silicon (GaN-on-Si) and high-frequency soft magnetic material. These materials are integrated on a small, 3D chip that can handle the same amount of power as traditional voltage regulators at 1/10 the size and with improved efficiency. The small size also frees up to 90% of the motherboard space occupied by current voltage regulators.
Date: September 1, 2010
open access

SECA Coal-Based Systems

Description: This report documents the results of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42613 between Siemens Energy and the U.S. Department of Energy for the period October 1, 2008 through September 30, 2010. The Phase I POCD8R0 stack test was successfully completed as it operated for approximately 5,300 hrs and achieved all test objectives. The stack test article contained twenty-four 75 cm active length Delta8 scandia-stabilized zirconia cells. Maximum power was approximately 10 kWe and the SOFC generator demonstrated an availability factor of 85% at 50% power or greater. The Phase II POCD8R1 stack test operated for approximately 410 hrs before being aborted due to a sudden decrease in voltage accompanied by a rapid increase in temperature. The POCD8R1 test article contained forty-eight 100 cm active length Delta8 scandia-stabilized zirconia cells arranged in an array of six bundles, with each bundle containing eight cells. Cell development activities resulted in an approximate 100% improvement in cell power at 900°C. Cell manufacturing process improvements led to manufacturing yields of greater than 40% for the Delta8 cells. Delta8 cells with an active length of 100 cm were successfully manufactured as were cells with a seamless closed end. A pressurized cell test article was assembled, installed into the pressurized test facility and limited pressurized testing conducted. Open circuit voltage tests were performed at one and three atmospheres at 950°C were in agreement wi th the theoretical increase in the Nernst potential. Failed guard heaters precluded further testing. The SOFC analytical basis for the baseline system was validated with experimental data. Two system configurations that utilize a pressurized SOFC design with separated anode and cathode streams were analyzed. System efficiencies greater than 60% were predicted when integrating the separated anode and cathode stream module configuration with a high efficiency catalytic gasifier.
Date: September 1, 2010
Creator: Pierre, Joseph
open access

Regenerative Fuel Cells: Renewable Energy Storage Devices Based on Neutral Water Input

Description: GRIDS Project: Proton Energy Systems is developing an energy storage device that converts water to hydrogen fuel when excess electricity is available, and then uses hydrogen to generate electricity when energy is needed. The system includes an electrolyzer, which generates and separates hydrogen and oxygen for storage, and a fuel cell which converts the hydrogen and oxygen back to electricity. Traditional systems use acidic membranes, and require expensive materials including platinum and titanium for key parts of the system. In contrast, Proton Energy Systems’ new system will use an inexpensive alkaline membrane and will contain only inexpensive metals such as nickel and stainless steel. If successful, Proton Energy Systems’ system will have similar performance to today’s regenerative fuel cell systems at a fraction of the cost, and can be used to store electricity on the electric grid.
Date: September 1, 2010
open access

MOGO: Model-Oriented Global Optimization of Petascale Applications

Description: The MOGO project was initiated under in 2008 under the DOE Program Announcement for Software Development Tools for Improved Ease-of-Use on Petascale systems (LAB 08-19). The MOGO team consisted of Oak Ridge National Lab, Argonne National Lab, and the University of Oregon. The overall goal of MOGO was to attack petascale performance analysis by developing a general framework where empirical performance data could be efficiently and accurately compared with performance expectations at various levels of abstraction. This information could then be used to automatically identify and remediate performance problems. MOGO was be based on performance models derived from application knowledge, performance experiments, and symbolic analysis. MOGO was able to make reasonable impact on existing DOE applications and systems. New tools and techniques were developed, which, in turn, were used on important DOE applications on DOE LCF systems to show significant performance improvements.
Date: September 14, 2012
Creator: Malony, Allen D. & Shende, Sameer S.
open access

Powerful, Efficient Electric Vehicle Chargers: Low-Cost, Highly-Integrated Silicon Carbide (SiC) Multichip Power Modules (MCPMs) for Plug-In Hybrid Electric

Description: ADEPT Project: Currently, charging the battery of an electric vehicle (EV) is a time-consuming process because chargers can only draw about as much power from the grid as a hair dryer. APEI is developing an EV charger that can draw as much power as a clothes dryer, which would drastically speed up charging time. APEI's charger uses silicon carbide (SiC)-based power transistors. These transistors control the electrical energy flowing through the charger's circuits more effectively and efficiently than traditional transistors made of straight silicon. The SiC-based transistors also require less cooling, enabling APEI to create EV chargers that are 10 times smaller than existing chargers.
Date: September 14, 2010
open access

Transistors for Electric Motor Drives: High-Performance GaN HEMT Modules for Agile Power Electronics

Description: ADEPT Project: Transphorm is developing transistors with gallium nitride (GaN) semiconductors that could be used to make cost-effective, high-performance power converters for a variety of applications, including electric motor drives which transmit power to a motor. A transistor acts like a switch, controlling the electrical energy that flows around an electrical circuit. Most transistors today use low-cost silicon semiconductors to conduct electrical energy, but silicon transistors don’t operate efficiently at high speeds and voltage levels. Transphorm is using GaN as a semiconductor material in its transistors because GaN performs better at higher voltages and frequencies, and it is more energy efficient than straight silicon. However, Transphorm is using inexpensive silicon as a base to help keep costs low. The company is also packaging its transistors with other electrical components that can operate quickly and efficiently at high power levels—increasing the overall efficiency of both the transistor and the entire motor drive.
Date: September 1, 2010
open access

Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program - Strategic Plan

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (NEM R&E) Program is dedicated to providing knowledge, technical expertise, and products to US agencies responsible for monitoring nuclear explosions in all environments and is successful in turning scientific breakthroughs into tools for use by operational monitoring agencies. To effectively address the rapidly evolving state of affairs, the NNSA NEM R&E program is structured around three program elements described within this strategic plan: Integration of New Monitoring Assets, Advanced Event Characterization, and Next-Generation Monitoring Systems. How the Program fits into the National effort and historical accomplishments are also addressed.
Date: September 1, 2004
Creator: Casey, Leslie A.
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