UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 7 Matching Results

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The Hard Red Winter Wheats

Description: This bulletin discusses the classes and varieties of hard red winter wheats and the areas in which they are successfully grown. Among the varieties discussed are Turkey, Kharkof, Kanred, Blackhull, Minturki, and Baeska.
Date: 1922
Creator: Clark, J. Allen (Jacob Allen), b. 1888 & Martin, John H. (John Holmes), 1893-

The Roundheaded Apple-Tree Borer

Description: This report discusses the roundheaded apple-tree borer, an insect in the eastern and midwestern United States that, in its larval stage, destroys the bark and wood of apple trees. Several methods of control are discussed, including worming, paints and washes, and sprays.Apple-tree borers.
Date: 1915
Creator: Brooks, Fred E.

Sixty-Day and Kherson Oats

Description: Report discussing the results of experiments undertaken to determine the viability of early oats in different regions of the United States since early oats typically thrive only in the Corn Belt and Great Plains regions.
Date: 1910
Creator: Warburton, C. W. (Clyde William), 1879-1950

The Soft Red Winter Wheats

Description: "At least 66 distinct varieties of soft red winter wheat, known by nearly 400 different names, are grown commercially in the United States, and additional varieties are grown experimentally. These varieties differ widely in yield, adaptation, milling and baking value, and other characteristics. The most widely grown varieties in the United States in order of importance are Fultz, Fulcaster, Mediterranean, Poole, Red May, Red Wave, and Harvest Queen. The area of each of these varieties in 1919 varied from about 4,800,000 acres to about 1,000,000 acres." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Leighty, C. E. (Clyde Evert), b. 1882 & Martin, John H. (John Holmes), 1893-

The Southern Corn Rootworm and Farm Practices to Control It

Description: "Of all corn pests in the South one of the most serious is the larva, or young, of the 12-spotted cucumber beetle -- the so-called southern corn rootworm. True to its name, it feeds on the roots, but in young corn it also drills a small hole in the stem just above the first circle of roots, boring out the crown and killing the bud.... Progressive farming methods, as described in this bulletin, will reduce the ravages of this insect. Burn over waste places to destroy dead grass, weeds, and rubbish in which the beetles winter. If possible, avoid planting corn in fields which contained corn the year before. Enrich the soil by planting legumes so that the corn will have a better chance of recovering from rootworm injury. Protect the bobwhite. This bird destroys many beetles of the rootworm. By careful observations, extending over a period of years, find out the dates between which the rooworm does the most damage; then time your planting so that it will fall either before or after these dates, taking into consideration, of course, other important factors in crop production." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Luginbill, Philip