UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 10 Matching Results

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Chestnut Blight

Description: "Chestnut blight, caused by a fungus brought into this country from Asia before 1904, is responsible for the death of millions of acres of chestnut growth in New England and the Middle Atlantic States. The disease spread rapidly to nearly all parts of the range of the native chestnut, and the remaining stands of the southern Appalachians face certain destruction. The present known distribution, its symptoms, and the fungus that causes the disease are described. The blight fungus itself does not have any effect upon the strength of chestnut timber, and blight-killed trees can be utilized for poles, posts, cordwood, lumber, and extract wood. Search is being made for native and foreign chestnuts resistant to the disease in the hope of finding a tree suitable for replacing the rapidly disappearing stands. Seedlings of Asiatic chestnuts, which have considerable natural resistance even though not immune, are being tested in the United States." -- p. ii
Date: 1930
Creator: Gravatt, G. F. & Gill, L. S.

Farm Practice with Lespedeza

Description: "The use of lespedeza as a farm crop has rapidly increased during the past few years. The increase in the use of lespedeza is due partly to the excellent results that have been obtained by the farmers who have been growing the Common variety, for hay and for pasture and soil improvement, but more particularly to the introduction of some new varieties that produce better yields, are adapted to a wider range of climatic conditions, and are generally better suited to the needs of the average farm than is the Common variety. This bulletin is based on information collected from farmers located in the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Kentucky who are growing lespedeza regularly as a farm crop. The information includes methods of seeding, varieties used, the place in the cropping system usually occupied by lespedeza, and practices that have developed in connection with the production and use of the crop in these States." -- p. 1
Date: 1934
Creator: Miller, H. A.

The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer

Description: Revised edition. This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. There are two generations in a season. As the second generation passes the winter in the corn roots, if the roots are destroyed or plowed, the pest will be largely subdued. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the borer. This bulletin gives the life history of the borer, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it." -- p. ii
Date: 1933
Creator: Ainslie, George G.

Muscadine Grapes

Description: "Muscadine grapes are indigenous to the southeastern section of the United States, where they grow in greater or less profusion in the wild state. Through careful selection from the wild grapes and scientific breeding there have been developed a considerable number of varieties particularly adapted to the home needs in the Southeast, both as table grapes and as raw material for a variety of food and beverage products. Not being resistant to low winter temperatures they do not thrive in the northern grape districts. Muscadines are relatively resistant to grape diseases and insect pests and do well with a minimum of care, but, like most fruits, respond favorably to good cultural treatment. This bulletin sets forth in nontechnical form the information accumulated by the Department [of Agriculture] over a considerable period of years on muscadine grape varieties, their bleeding, culture, and uses." -- p. ii
Date: 1938
Creator: Dearing, Charles

Soil Defense in the Piedmont

Description: "This bulletin deals with erosion of the soil and measures of defense which have proved successful in controlling erosion in that part of the Piedmont country lying in the five States of Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia, and Alabama. The region is the rolling foothill country of the Appalachian Range, and extends east and south to the fall line which separates the Piedmont from the broad, gently sloping Atlantic and Gulf Coastsal Plains." -- p. ii. Measures of soil defense considered include terracing, contour tillage, strip cropping, close-growing crops in the rotation, and contour furrowing in pastures.
Date: 1937
Creator: Rowalt, E. M.

Wildlife Conservation Through Erosion Control in the Piedmont

Description: "Erosion has left scars on a majority of farms in the Southeast. Too poor to produce crops, the eroding spots are usually abandoned. Unless they are treated to stop further washing of the soil they grow steadily larger and continually rob the farmer of more of his land. Fortunately, soil conservation and wildlife management can be effectively combined, and otherwise worthless areas made to produce a crop of game, fur bearers, and other desirable types of wildlife. The general principles of wildlife management on the farm are described in Farmers' Bulletins 1719 and 1759. The purpose of this bulletin is to show how gullies, terrace outlets, waterways, eroding field borders, pastures, and woodlands in the Piedmont region may be protected against erosion through the use of vegetation that will also provide food and cover for wildlife." -- p. ii
Date: 1937
Creator: Stevens, Ross O.