UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 12 Matching Results

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Bur Clover

Description: This report discusses the cultivation of bur clover, which is an annual legume that serves as a winter cover crop and as pasturage. The best practices for and uses of bur clover are discussed in detail.
Date: 1915
Creator: Piper, Charles V. (Charles Vancouver), 1867-1926 & McKee, Roland

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 53

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Inoculation and Lime for Alfalfa, Citrus Culture in Southern Texas, Pruning Rotundifolia Grapes, Native Hays or Arid Region, Bermuda Grass, Short v. Long Feeding of Beef Cattle, Contagious Abortion of Cattle, Preventing Losses at Lambing time, Winter Lambs for the Pacific Coast Market, Feeding Work Horses, Colony Houses for Poultry, Food of the Crow Blackbird, and Flour for Baking Powder Biscuits.
Date: 1909
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.

The Hard Red Winter Wheats

Description: This bulletin discusses the classes and varieties of hard red winter wheats and the areas in which they are successfully grown. Among the varieties discussed are Turkey, Kharkof, Kanred, Blackhull, Minturki, and Baeska.
Date: 1922
Creator: Clark, J. Allen (Jacob Allen), b. 1888 & Martin, John H. (John Holmes), 1893-

Horse Beans

Description: This bulletin discuss the horse bean (or fava bean), which is a legume cultivated widely in many nations and holds great potential as a crop along the Pacific and Gulf Coasts of the United States.
Date: 1918
Creator: McKee, Roland

Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States

Description: "The information given in this bulletin should enable farmers in the Great Plains and Western States to select from the more common species of grasses some one or more suited to their needs [for soil and water conservation]. Common harvesting equipment and farm machinery can be adapted to the proper handling of native grasses. This brings the cost of such work within the means of most farmers." -- p. i. Among the grasses discussed are wheatgrass, buffalo grass, bluestem, grama, Bermuda grass, wild rye, hilaria, Sudan grass, bluegrass, panic grasses, dropseed, and needlegrass.
Date: 1939
Creator: Hoover, Max M. (Max Manley), 1895-

Purple Vetch

Description: This bulletin discusses purple vetch, a plant used for hay, manure, and pasturage that grows readily along the Pacific and Gulf Coasts of the United States.
Date: 1918
Creator: McKee, Roland

Sixty-Day and Kherson Oats

Description: Report discussing the results of experiments undertaken to determine the viability of early oats in different regions of the United States since early oats typically thrive only in the Corn Belt and Great Plains regions.
Date: 1910
Creator: Warburton, C. W. (Clyde William), 1879-1950

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Because strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove helpful to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Date: 1941
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889- & Waldo, George F. (George Fordyce), b. 1898

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Date: 1919
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "Strawberries can be grown in those parts of the western Untied States in which ordinary farm crops are irrigated as well as in western Oregon and Washington, where irrigation is not essential but may be profitable. The principles of irrigating strawberries are essentially the same as those for other crops. Because strawberries are sensitive to the alkali salts that irrigation brings to the surface, such salts must be washed out or skimmed off. The strawberry grower, after choosing a suitable site and preparing the soil carefully, should select varieties adapted to his district and needs. He should use plants that are disease-free. In California, southern Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas the plants should have undergone a rest period. Usually the growers plant during the period of greatest rainfall. By using the recommended systems of training and care before, during, and after setting of the plants and the suggested methods of decreasing diseases and insect pests, he should obtain better yields. A grower can furnish consumers a better product by using good methods of harvesting and shipment. He can prolong the fresh-fruit season only a little by the use of cold storage, but he can extend his market by growing varieties suitable for preserving, canning, and freezing." -- p. ii
Date: 1948
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889- & Waldo, George F. (George Fordyce), b. 1898

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Date: 1933
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Date: 1928
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-