UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 36 Matching Results

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Beekeeping in the Buckwheat Region

Description: "The production of the full honey crop from buckwheat requires a plan of apiary management quite different from that of most other beekeeping regions. A system of management is here given which will result in a full honey crop and at the same time control European foulbrood, which is so prevalent in the buckwheat region. Methods are also given which may be used in case the clovers are valuable as sources of nectar." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Phillips, Everett Franklin, 1878-1951 & Demuth, Geo. S. (George S.)

Beekeeping in the Tulip-Tree Region

Description: "Many thousand colonies of bees occur in the region where the tulip-tree is abundant but the honey crop from tulip-tree flowers inconsiderable. Too few beekeepers in this region have modern equipment, it is true, but the greatest loss comes from the fact that they do not care for their bees so as to have them ready to gather the abundant nectar from this early-blooming tree. In this bulletin a methods is given for the management of the apiary so that the full honey crop from this source may be obtained." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Phillips, Everett Franklin, 1878-1951 & Demuth, Geo. S. (George S.)

The Carpet Beetle or "Buffalo Moth"

Description: Report discussing the carpet beetle (also known as the buffalo moth) and its geographic distribution, life cycle, habits, and methods for exterminating it.
Date: 1914
Creator: Howard, L. O. (Leland Ossian), 1857-1950

Chestnut Blight

Description: "Chestnut blight, caused by a fungus brought into this country from Asia before 1904, is responsible for the death of millions of acres of chestnut growth in New England and the Middle Atlantic States. The disease spread rapidly to nearly all parts of the range of the native chestnut, and the remaining stands of the southern Appalachians face certain destruction. The present known distribution, its symptoms, and the fungus that causes the disease are described. The blight fungus itself does not have any effect upon the strength of chestnut timber, and blight-killed trees can be utilized for poles, posts, cordwood, lumber, and extract wood. Search is being made for native and foreign chestnuts resistant to the disease in the hope of finding a tree suitable for replacing the rapidly disappearing stands. Seedlings of Asiatic chestnuts, which have considerable natural resistance even though not immune, are being tested in the United States." -- p. ii
Date: 1930
Creator: Gravatt, G. F. & Gill, L. S.

The Control of the Chestnut Bark Disease

Description: Report discussing the spread of the chestnut bark disease, including its causes, symptoms, modes of transmission, financial consequences, and the possible methods of controlling it.
Date: 1911
Creator: Metcalf, Haven, 1875-1940 & Collins, J. Franklin (James Franklin), b. 1863

The Culture of Winter Wheat in the Eastern United States

Description: Report discussing best practices for growing winter wheat in the eastern United States. Topics discussed include soils adapted to wheat cultivation, fertilizers, seed selection and preparation, and crop rotation.
Date: 1914
Creator: Leighty, C. E. (Clyde Evert), b. 1882

The Culture of Winter Wheat in the Eastern United States

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for growing winter wheat in the eastern United States. Topics discussed include soils adapted to wheat cultivation, fertilizers, seed selection and preparation, and crop rotation.
Date: 1917
Creator: Leighty, C. E. (Clyde Evert), b. 1882

The Eelworm Disease of Wheat and Its Control

Description: "The eelworm disease of wheat, long known in Europe, has been found during the past year causing considerable damage in Virginia and in isolated localities in West Virginia, Maryland, Georgia, and California. Every effort should be made to control the trouble in these infested regions, to prevent its further spread, and to find other localities where the disease may exist. The disease may be recognized on young and old plants and in the thrashed wheat by the descriptions given in this bulletin. The trouble may be controlled by use of clean seed, by crop rotation, and by sanitation. If clean seed cannot be procured from uninfested localities, diseased seed can be made safe for planting by the salt-brine treatment here described." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Byars, Luther P.

The Eelworm Disease of Wheat and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The eelworm disease of wheat, long known in Europe, has been found during the past year causing considerable damage in Virginia and in isolated localities in West Virginia, Maryland, Georgia, and California. Every effort should be made to control the trouble in these infested regions, to prevent its further spread, and to find other localities where the disease may exist. The disease may be recognized on young and old plants and in the thrashed wheat by the descriptions given in this bulletin. The trouble may be controlled by use of clean seed, by crop rotation, and by sanitation. If clean seed cannot be procured from uninfested localities, diseased seed can be made safe for planting by the salt-brine treatment here described." -- p. 2
Date: 1920
Creator: Byars, Luther P.

Eradication of Ferns from Pasture Lands in the Eastern United States

Description: "There are nearly 7,500 recognized species of ferns in the world, of which number over 200 are known to be native to the United States. A few species have become weed pests in this country, and it is to a discussion of the control of these weedy ferns that this bulletin is devoted. The parts of the United States in which ferns are bad weeds are, principally, (1) the hill country of the Northeastern States and the higher portions of the Appalachian Mountain region as far south as Georgia, and (2) the Pacific coast country west of the Cascade Mountains.... This publication deals only with fern eradication in the Eastern States." -- p. 1-2
Date: 1915
Creator: Cox, H. R. (Herbert Randolph)

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 28

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Home Mixing Fertilizers, Sweet Corn in the South, Kherson Oats, Cowpea Hay, Weight of Feeds, Grain Rations, Horse Feeding, Classification of Swine, Silage for Dairy Cows.
Date: 1905
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 47

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Low-Grade v. High-Grade Fertilizers; Improvement of Sandy Soils; Dry Farming; Seed Selection; Evergreens: Uses and Culture; Nut Growing in Maryland; "Hogging Off" Corn; Mineral Matter in Feeding Stuff; Preparation of Miscible Oils; an Automatic Cheese Press; and Cane Sugar and Beet Sugar.
Date: 1908
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.

Fall-Sown Grains in Maryland and Virginia

Description: "For the best results, fall-sown grains in Maryland, Delaware, and the Virginias require -- A well-drained, fertile soil, well-supplied with humus and lime. An abundance of available plant food, supplied by the use of stable manure, green crops turned under, and commercial fertilizers. A rotation which includes at least one cultivated crop and one or more legumes. A seed bed with the surface 2 or 3 inches loose and finely pulverized, while the soil just beneath is firm and moist. Good, pure, cleaned, and graded seed which has been treated for smut, sown with a drill at the proper time and rate. Varieties which are adapted to the locality and which produce high yields of grain of good quality. The best varieties are listed on page 23." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Stanton, T. R. (Thomas Ray), b. 1885

Farm Practice in the Use of Commercial Fertilizers in the South Atlantic States

Description: Report discussing the use of fertilizers on the more important soils of the South Atlantic States in the growing of staple farm crops. Factors which influence the use of commercial fertilizers such as crop rotation, legumes, and manure are discussed. In addition, methods for fertilizing cotton, corn, oats, wheat, and cowpea are discussed.
Date: 1910
Creator: Beavers, J. C.

Handling and Loading Southern New Potatoes

Description: This bulletin discusses methods for handling, loading, and transporting southern new potatoes in the United States. It explains the importance of grading potatoes, removing bruised and diseased potatoes from the crop before transport, and loading cars properly. Potatoes may be loaded into cars in barrels, sacks, and crates, but hampers should not be used.
Date: 1919
Creator: Grimes, A. M.

Handling and Loading Southern New Potatoes

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses methods for handling, loading, and transporting southern new potatoes in the United States. It explains the importance of grading potatoes, removing bruised and diseased potatoes from the crop before transport, and loading cars properly. Potatoes may be loaded into cars in barrels, sacks, and crates, but hampers should not be used.
Date: 1927
Creator: Grimes, A. M.

How to Attract Birds in the Middle Atlantic States

Description: "For economic as well as for aesthetic reasons an effort should be made to attract and protect birds and to increase their numbers. Where proper measures of this kind have been taken an increase of several fold in the bird population has resulted, with decreased losses from depredations of injurious insects. This bulletin is one of a series intended to describe the best methods of attracting birds in various parts of the United States, especially by providing a food supply and other accessories about the homestead." -- p. 2. This particular bulletin focuses on birds in the Middle Atlantic states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, West Virginia, Virginia, and North Carolina.
Date: 1917
Creator: McAtee, W. L. (Waldo Lee), 1883-1962

The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer

Description: This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. This bulletin gives the life history of the insect, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it. There are two generations in a season, so greater vigilance is necessary. The second generation passes the winter only in the corn roots, so if these are destroyed or plowed under deeply, the pest will be largely decreased. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the pest." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Ainslie, George G.

The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer

Description: Revised edition. This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. There are two generations in a season. As the second generation passes the winter in the corn roots, if the roots are destroyed or plowed, the pest will be largely subdued. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the borer. This bulletin gives the life history of the borer, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it." -- p. ii
Date: 1933
Creator: Ainslie, George G.