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Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 3 testing

Description: This document summarizes the results of the phase 3 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the sealing integrity of the FRS to ensure that the release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from Tank 241-SY-101. The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the mixer pump. This acceptance test was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 area from January 10, 1995 to January 17, 1995. The Phase 3 test consisted of two parts. Part one was a water leak test of the seal between the blast shield and mock load distribution frame (LDF) to ensure that significant contamination of the pump pit and waste interaction with the aluminum impact-limiting material under the LDF are prevented during the pump removal operation. The second part of this acceptance test was an air leak test of the assembled flexible receiver system. The purpose of this test was to verify that the release of hazardous aerosols will be minimized if the tank dome pressure becomes slightly positive during the decontamination of the mixer pump.
Date: February 6, 1995
Creator: Ritter, G.A.

Acceptance test report 2721-Z upgrades

Description: This test procedure provides instructions for acceptance testing of modifications to the 2721-Z diesel-generator system made by Project C-189. The modifications include (1) replacing the generator NUMA-LOGIC controller with connection to the PFP distributed control system (DCS), (2) replacing ATSI with a breaker switching scheme for 2736-ZB backup power and (3) providing a method for generator load and system testing.
Date: February 3, 1998
Creator: Keck, R. D.

Access road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington: Environmental assessment

Description: The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct an access road on the Hanford Site, from State Route (SR) 240 to Beloit Avenue in the 200 West Area. Traffic volume during shift changes creates an extremely serious congestion and safety problem on Route 4S from the Wye barricade to the 200 Areas. A Risk Evaluation (Trost 1992) indicated that there is a probability of 1.53 fatal accidents on Route 4S within 2 years. To help alleviate this danger, a new 3.5-kilometer (2.2-mile)-long access road would be constructed from Beloit Avenue in the 200 West Area to SR 240. In addition, administrative controls such as redirecting traffic onto alternate routes would be used to further reduce traffic volume. The proposed access road would provide an alternative travel-to-work route for many outer area personnel, particularly those with destinations in the 200 West Area. This proposal is the most reasonable alternative to reduce the problem. While traffic safety would be greatly improved, a small portion of the shrub-steppe habitat would be disturbed. The DOE would offset any habitat damage by re-vegetation or other appropriate habitat enhancement activities elsewhere on the Hanford Site. This Environmental Assessment (EA) provides information about the environmental impacts of the proposed action, so a decision can be made to either prepare an Environmental Impact Statement or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact.
Date: February 1, 1994

Accident Analysis for High-Level Waste Management Alternatives in the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

Description: A comparative generic accident analysis was performed for the programmatic alternatives for high-level waste (HLW) management in the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). The key facilities and operations of the five major HLW management phases were considered: current storage, retrieval, pretreatment, treatment, and interim canister storage. A spectrum of accidents covering the risk-dominant accidents was analyzed. Preliminary results are presented for HLW management at the Hanford site. A comparison of these results with those previously advanced shows fair agreement.
Date: February 1, 1994
Creator: Folga, S.; Mueller, C. & Roglans-Ribas, J.

Accident investigation of the electrical shock incident at the PG and E PVUSA site Davis, California

Description: This report summarizes the findings of the Accident Investigation Team (Team) assembled in response to a request from Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) to understand the events surrounding the electric shock of a worker at the PVUSA site in Davis, California and to provide recommendations to prevent such events from recurring. The report gives complete details on the sequence of events surrounding the accident and identifies 27 facts related to accident itself. Four technical deficiencies in the electrical systems which require further investigation were identified. The Team believes that the root cause of this accident was related to the absence of a proactive organizational entity responsible for overall health and safety on the site. Two contributing factors were identified. First, the prototype nature and associated operational difficulties of the electrical inverter resulted in large maintenance demands. Second, several of the injured employee`s co-workers noted that he occasionally failed to use appropriate personal protective equipment, but they never reported this practice to management. The direct cause of this accident was the failure of the injured employee to wear appropriate personal protective equipment (i.e., rubber gloves). Based on the review of the facts established in this investigation, five recommendations are presented to the funding agencies to reduce the possibility of future accidents at the PVUSA site.
Date: February 1, 1992
Creator: Jacobson, L.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Garrett, J.O. & Tyler, R.

Accident source terms for Light-Water Nuclear Power Plants. Final report

Description: In 1962 tile US Atomic Energy Commission published TID-14844, ``Calculation of Distance Factors for Power and Test Reactors`` which specified a release of fission products from the core to the reactor containment for a postulated accident involving ``substantial meltdown of the core``. This ``source term``, tile basis for tile NRC`s Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4, has been used to determine compliance with tile NRC`s reactor site criteria, 10 CFR Part 100, and to evaluate other important plant performance requirements. During the past 30 years substantial additional information on fission product releases has been developed based on significant severe accident research. This document utilizes this research by providing more realistic estimates of the ``source term`` release into containment, in terms of timing, nuclide types, quantities and chemical form, given a severe core-melt accident. This revised ``source term`` is to be applied to the design of future light water reactors (LWRs). Current LWR licensees may voluntarily propose applications based upon it.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Soffer, L.; Burson, S.B.; Ferrell, C.M.; Lee, R.Y. & Ridgely, J.N.

Accidental beam loss in superconducting accelerators: Simulations, consequences of accidents and protective measures

Description: The consequences of an accidental beam loss in superconducting accelerators and colliders of the next generation range from the mundane to rather dramatic, i.e., from superconducting magnet quench, to overheating of critical components, to a total destruction of some units via explosion. Specific measures are required to minimize and eliminate such events as much as practical. In this paper we study such accidents taking the Superconducting Supercollider complex as an example. Particle tracking, beam loss and energy deposition calculations were done using the realistic machine simulation with the Monte-Carlo codes MARS 12 and STRUCT. Protective measures for minimizing the damaging effects of prefire and misfire of injection and extraction kicker magnets are proposed here.
Date: February 1, 1994
Creator: Drozhdin, A.; Mokhov, N. & Parker, B.

Accountability for network backup failures

Description: Regular hard disk backups for workstations are widely recommended. The necessity of backups -- akin to one`s own mortality -- is something most people would rather not think about. This attitude has two consequences. When people do subscribe to automated network backups, they expect the system to perform at a high level of reliability and that their files will be there for them when they need them. Second, they usually fail to appreciate that reliability is a shared responsibility. Although ostensibly their only responsibility is to keep the computer powered on overnight, there are actually many more opportunities for failure within the user`s jurisdiction than in other parts of the infrastructure. High reliability is almost a sine qua non for backups. We describe a strategy for enhancing reliability based on the principle of accountability. This strategy involves monitoring the system, gathering statistics, detecting problems, anticipating problems, troubleshooting, and finally determining where failure occurred within the infrastructure and who should be accountable. We describe a specific backup system in a specific network environment to illustrate the value of accountability. This system, macdumps, backs up Macintosh disks over an AppleTalk network. The original software was written by Dan Tappan of BBN in the early years of the Mac and is available by ftp for noncommercial use. It has proven reliable and robust. Despite the high quality of the fundamental software, there are still many opportunities for failure within the infrastructure. We first discuss accountability in the context of network backups, then briefly describe how the backup system operates, the components of the infrastructure, types of failures experienced, and then summarize our experience.
Date: February 1, 1994
Creator: Benson, W. H.

Accuracy issues in modeling superplastic metal forming

Description: The utility of finite element modeling in optimizing superplastic metal forming is dependent on accurate representation of the material constitutive behavior and the frictional response of the sheet against the die surface. This paper presents work conducted to estimate the level of precision that is necessary in constitutive relations for finite element analysis to accurately predict the deformation history of actual SPF components. Previous work identified errors in SPF testing methods that use short tensile specimens with gauge length-to-width ratios of 2:1 or less. The analysis of the present paper was performed to estimate the error in predicted stress that results from using the short specimens. Stress correction factors were developed and an improved constitutive relation was implemented in the MARC finite element code to simulate the forming of a long, rectangular tray. The coefficient of friction in a Coulomb friction model was adjusted to reproduce the amount of material draw-in observed in the forming experiments. Comparisons between the finite element predictions and the forming experiments are presented.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Johnson, K.I.; Khaleel, M.A.; Lavender, C.A. & Smith, M.T.

Accurate, reliable control of process gases by mass flow controllers

Description: The thermal mass flow controller, or MFC, has become an instrument of choice for the monitoring and controlling of process gas flow throughout the materials processing industry. These MFCs are used on CVD processes, etching tools, and furnaces and, within the semiconductor industry, are used on 70% of the processing tools. Reliability and accuracy are major concerns for the users of the MFCs. Calibration and characterization technologies for the development and implementation of mass flow devices are described. A test facility is available to industry and universities to test and develop gas floe sensors and controllers and evaluate their performance related to environmental effects, reliability, reproducibility, and accuracy. Additional work has been conducted in the area of accuracy. A gravimetric calibrator was invented that allows flow sensors to be calibrated in corrosive, reactive gases to an accuracy of 0.3% of reading, at least an order of magnitude better than previously possible. Although MFCs are typically specified with accuracies of 1% of full scale, MFCs may often be implemented with unwarranted confidence due to the conventional use of surrogate gas factors. Surrogate gas factors are corrections applied to process flow indications when an MFC has been calibrated on a laboratory-safe surrogate gas, but is actually used on a toxic, or corrosive process gas. Previous studies have indicated that the use of these factors may cause process flow errors of typically 10%, but possibly as great as 40% of full scale. This paper will present possible sources of error in MFC process gas flow monitoring and control, and will present an overview of corrective measures which may be implemented with MFC use to significantly reduce these sources of error.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Hardy, J. & McKnight, T.

Achieving Agility Through Parameter Space Qualification

Description: The A-primed (Agile Product Realization of Innovative electro-Mechanical Devices) project is defining and proving processes for agile product realization for the Department of Energy complex. Like other agile production efforts reported in the literature, A-primed uses concurrent engineering and information automation technologies to enhance information transfer. A unique aspect of our approach to agility is the qualification during development of a family of related product designs and their production processes, rather than a single design and its attendant processes. Applying engineering principles and statistical design of experiments, economies of test and analytic effort are realized for the qualification of the device family as a whole. Thus the need is minimized for test and analysis to qualify future devices from this family, thereby further reducing the design-to-production cycle time. As a measure of the success of the A-primed approach, the first design took 24 days to produce, and operated correctly on the first attempt. A flow diagram for the qualification process is presented. Guidelines are given for implementation, based on the authors experiences as members of the A-primed qualification team.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Diegert, Kathleen V.; Easterling, Robert G.; Ashby, M. Rodema; Benavides, Gilbert L.; Forsythe, Chris; Jones, Rondall E. et al.

Acid measurements via near-infrared spectroscopy

Description: We were able to predict acid concentration to {plus_minus}0.08M HNO{sub 3}. In the presence of Al{sup 3} interference, the prediction dropped to {plus_minus}0.29 mols/liter over the range 0 to 9M HNO{sub 3}. Temperature affects the prediction of acid adversely and would have to be modelled out or the sample cell thermostated prior to using this method. 10 refs, 12 figs.(DLC)
Date: February 13, 1991
Creator: Buchanan, B. R.

Acid measurements via near-infrared spectroscopy

Description: We were able to predict acid concentration to {plus minus}0.08M HNO{sub 3}. In the presence of Al{sup 3} interference, the prediction dropped to {plus minus}0.29 mols/liter over the range 0 to 9M HNO{sub 3}. Temperature affects the prediction of acid adversely and would have to be modelled out or the sample cell thermostated prior to using this method. 10 refs, 12 figs.(DLC)
Date: February 13, 1991
Creator: Buchanan, B. R.

Acid-permanganate oxidation of potassium tetraphenylboron

Description: Scoping experiments have been performed which show that potassium tetraphenylboron (KTPB) is rapidly oxidized by permanganate in acidic solutions at room temperature. The main Products are CO{sub 2}, highly oxidized organic compounds related to tartaric and tartronic acids, boric acid, and potassium phosphate (when phosphoric acid is used as the source of acid). One liter of 0.6M NaMnO{sub 4}/2.5M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution will destroy up to 8 grams of KTPB. The residual benzene concentration has been measured to be less than the RCRA limit of 0.5 ppm. Approximately 30% of the organic material is released as CO{sub 2} (trace CO) and 0.16% as benzene vapor. The reaction is well behaved, no foaming or spattering. Tests were performed from .15M to near 1M permanganate. The phosphoric acid concentration was maintained at a concentration at least three times that of the permanganate since an excess of acid was desired and this is the ratio that these two reagents are consumed in the oxidation.
Date: February 1, 1993
Creator: Smith, J. R.

Acid-permanganate oxidation of potassium tetraphenylboron

Description: Scoping experiments have been performed which show that potassium tetraphenylboron (KTPB) is rapidly oxidized by permanganate in acidic solutions at room temperature. The main Products are CO[sub 2], highly oxidized organic compounds related to tartaric and tartronic acids, boric acid, and potassium phosphate (when phosphoric acid is used as the source of acid). One liter of 0.6M NaMnO[sub 4]/2.5M H[sub 3]PO[sub 4] solution will destroy up to 8 grams of KTPB. The residual benzene concentration has been measured to be less than the RCRA limit of 0.5 ppm. Approximately 30% of the organic material is released as CO[sub 2] (trace CO) and 0.16% as benzene vapor. The reaction is well behaved, no foaming or spattering. Tests were performed from .15M to near 1M permanganate. The phosphoric acid concentration was maintained at a concentration at least three times that of the permanganate since an excess of acid was desired and this is the ratio that these two reagents are consumed in the oxidation.
Date: February 1, 1993
Creator: Smith, J.R.

Acoustic 3D imaging of dental structures

Description: Our goals for the first year of this three dimensional electodynamic imaging project was to determine how to combine flexible, individual addressable; preprocessing of array source signals; spectral extrapolation or received signals; acoustic tomography codes; and acoustic propagation modeling code. We investigated flexible, individually addressable acoustic array material to find the best match in power, sensitivity and cost and settled on PVDF sheet arrays and 3-1 composite material.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Lewis, D.K.; Hume, W.R. & Douglass, G.D.

Acoustic hygrometer. Final report

Description: The water vapor content for air in drier ducts, ovens, furnaces and the like is determined by a measurement of sound speed which is done by measuring the time difference between sound pulses reflected by two reflectors spaced a known distance apart in a guide tube. The transmitter-receiver is located at one end of the tube. The tube has enough number of holes to allow the hot moist air to get into the probe tube. A non-porous tube containing dry air placed in the same duct provides a similar measurement of dry-sound speed. The ratio of the two speeds of sound or the two measured time intervals is a simple function of the water vapor content practically independent of temperature thereby providing a very accurate measurement of water vapor content over an extremely wide range of temperatures. The sensor is accurate, immune to harsh environments, has an extremely low time constant, has absolutely no hysteresis and needs no calibration.
Date: February 2, 1998
Creator: Shakkottai, P. & Kwack, E.Y.

An acoustically controlled tetherless underwater vehicle for installation and maintenance of neutrino detectors in the deep ocean

Description: The task of installing and servicing high energy neutrino detectors in the deep ocean from a surface support vessel is problematic using conventional tethered systems. An array of multiple detector strings rising 500 m from the ocean floor, and forming a grid with 50 m spacing between the strings, presents a substantial entanglement hazard for equipment cables deployed from the surface. Such tasks may be accomplished with fewer risks using a tetherless underwater remotely operated vehicle that has a local acoustic telemetry link to send control commands and sensor data between the vehicle and a stationary hydrophone suspended above or just outside the perimeter of the work site. The Phase I effort involves the development of an underwater acoustic telemetry link for vehicle control and sensor feedback, the evaluation of video compression methods for real-time acoustic transmission of video through the water, and the defining of local control routines on board the vehicle to allow it to perform certain basic maneuvering tasks autonomously, or to initiate a self-rescue if the acoustic control link should be lost. In Phase II, a prototype tetherless vehicle system will be designed and constructed to demonstrate the ability to install cable interconnections within a detector array at 4 km depth. The same control technology could be used with a larger more powerful vehicle to maneuver the detector strings into desired positions as they are being lowered to the ocean floor.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Ballou, Philip J.

Acquisition and reduction of data obtained from tank 101-SY in-situ ball rheometer

Description: Development of the ball rheometer to measure rheological properties and density of the waste in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 will be completed around September 1994. This instrument is expected to provide the first-of-its-kind in-situ measurements of the fluid properties of the waste contained within this tank. A mixer pump has been installed in this tank, and this pump has been very successful at mitigating the flammable gas problem associated with Tank 101-SY. The ball rheometer will serve as a diagnostic tool for judging the effectiveness of mixing in Tank 101-SY and others and will be one of few in-situ probes available for diagnostic measurements. Based on experiments performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratory, it is believed that a generalized Bingham fluid model (Herschel-Bulkley fluid model) may be useful for describing at least some of the waste contained in Tank 101-SY, and data obtained in the tank will initially be reduced using this fluid model. The single largest uncertainty in the determination of the drag force on the ball is the drag force which will be experienced by the cable attached to the ball. This drag can be a substantial fraction of the total drag when the ball is deep within the tank. It is expected that the fluid properties may be history dependent, thus rheological properties of the undisturbed fluid may be different from the same properties after the fluid has been disturbed by passage of the ball. The data collection strategy allows the determination of the waste fluid rheology both in the undisturbed state and after it has been disturbed by the ball. Unlike the rheological parameters, measurement of density requires no model for its interpretation; however, the effects of yield stress may need to be accounted for. This measurement can be made with fairly good ...
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Shepard, C. L.; Chieda, M. A.; Kirihara, L. J.; Phillips, J. R.; Shekarriz, A.; Terrones, G. et al.

Acrylic mechanical bond tests

Description: The tensile strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of bond joint thickness. 0.125 in. thick bond joints were found to posses the maximum strength while the acceptable range of joints varied from 0.063 in. to almost 0.25 in. Such joints are used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.
Date: February 1, 1991
Creator: Wouters, J. M. & Doe, P. J.

Acrylic vessel cleaning tests

Description: The acrylic vessel as constructed is dirty. The dirt includes blue tape, Al tape, grease pencil, gemak, the glue or residue form these tapes, finger prints and dust of an unknown composition but probably mostly acrylic dust. This dirt has to be removed and once removed, the vessel has to be kept clean or at least to be easily cleanable at some future stage when access becomes much more difficult. The authors report on the results of a series of tests designed: (a) to prepare typical dirty samples of acrylic; (b) to remove dirt stuck to the acrylic surface; and (c) to measure the optical quality and Th concentration after cleaning. Specifications of the vessel call for very low levels of Th which could come from tape residues, the grease pencil, or other sources of dirt. This report does not address the concerns of how to keep the vessel clean after an initial cleaning and during the removal of the scaffolding. Alconox is recommended as the cleaner of choice. This acrylic vessel will be used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.
Date: February 26, 1997
Creator: Earle, D.; Hahn, R.L.; Boger, J. & Bonvin, E.