UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 12 Matching Results

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AIDS Funding for Federal Government Programs: FY1981-FY1999

Description: This report provides a synopsis of the budget activity related to AIDS from the discovery of the disease in 1981 through FY1999. Funding for AIDS research, prevention and treatment programs within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) discretionary budget has increased from $200,000 in FY1981 to an estimated $3.85 billion in FY1999.
Date: March 31, 1998
Creator: Johnson, Judith A.

Experimental results of calcine dissolution studies performed during FY-94,95

Description: Calcine dissolution studies were performed in FY-94,95 in order to extend the knowledge of dissolution and to obtain information necessary for scale-up design and operation. Experiments reported in this document were performed with non-radioactive and actual calcines to generate qualitative data regarding: (a) calcine dissolution rates, (b) undissolved solids settling characteristics, (c) undissolved solids heel formation, and (d) chemical treatments for undissolved solids heel dissolution. The goal of this work was to achieve complete calcine dissolution, or to determine conditions that would result in the maximum calcine dissolution. Small scale laboratory experiments (test-tube dissolutions) and a bench scale dissolver set-up were used in the effort. Results from this work show the bulk of the undissolved solids to settle at a rate of >9 inches per second when the baseline dissolution parameters are used. Baseline dissolution parameters were 100 grams of calcine being dissolved in 1 L of 5 M HNO{sub 3} at > 90 C while the solution is being vigorously and constantly mixed. This work also verified that dissolution is most complete when performed with aggressive mixing. Sequential dissolutions performed with non-radioactive and actual calcine indicate that little undissolved solids heel build-up is expected, and this small heel can be further dissolved by increasing the dissolution time or by adding fresh nitric acid.
Date: September 1997
Creator: Brewer, K. N.; Olson, A. L.; Roesener, W. S. & Tonso, J. L.

Functional design criteria for FY 1993-2000 groundwater monitoring wells

Description: The purpose of this revision is to update the Line Item Project, 93-L-GFW-152 Functional Design Criteria (FDC) to reflect changes approved in change control M-24-91-6, Engineering Change Notices (ECNs), and expand the scope to include subsurface investigations along with the borehole drilling. This revision improves the ability and effectiveness of maintaining RCRA and Operational groundwater compliance by combining borehole and well drilling with subsurface data gathering objectives. The total projected number of wells to be installed under this project has decreased from 200 and the scope has been broadened to include additional subsurface investigation activities that usually occur simultaneously with most traditional borehole drilling and monitoring well installations. This includes borehole hydrogeologic characterization activities, and vadose monitoring. These activities are required under RCRA 40 CFR 264 and 265 and WAC 173-303 for site characterization, groundwater and vadose assessment and well placement.
Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Williams, B.A.

FY94 and FY95 thermal stabilization campaign report

Description: The report provides a synopsis of the FY94/95 Thermal Stabilization Campaign. The FY94 Thermal Stabilization Campaign ran from November 1, 1994 to June 13, 1995 and stabilized 236 items (22 kg) of reactive plutonium bearing material. A total of 49 cans of stabilized material was moved to the vaults for interim storage. While the initial downtime was high, with an Operating Efficiency (OE) of 27% over the first 3 months, the OE improved to 78% during the last 5 months for an overall DE of 58%. The campaign was completed 85 days ahead of schedule thus exceeding the ``Excellent``date for the Performance Base Incentive (PBI) for this campaign by 25 business days.
Date: January 10, 1996
Creator: Lewis, W.S.

Geothermal Division Multiyear Plan FY 1992-1996

Description: This administrative report of the Department of Energy is dated December 21, 1990. It is marked ''DRAFT'' as were many of this type of report, most of which were never made ''Final''. It provides contextual elements for program planning, and covers research on Hydrothermal, Geopressured Geothermal, Hot Dry Rock, and Magma Energy systems. (DJE 2005)
Date: December 21, 1990

Hadron blind detector. Final report, FY1994 and 1995

Description: The authors have been developing a novel threshold Cherenkov detector, consisting of a gas radiator followed by a UV photosensitive wire chamber using CsI photocathodes. The photo-detector lies directly in the particle path and is thus required to have single photo-electron sensitivity and yet to be insensitive to the passage of a charged particle. In addition, the detector should be made of low mass material to minimize the effect of multiple scatterings. The proposed threshold Cherenkov counters are called Hadron Blind Detectors (HBDs) because they are blind to low energy hadrons which have lower speed {beta} for given momentum p than that of electrons. HBDs can be used in colliders, especially heavy ion hadron colliders (RHIC, LHC), which have huge {number_sign} of hadrons produced per event, to select electrons by being blind to low-momentum hadrons. The authors have studied two different methods to build HBDs described as follows: (1) windowless configuration; (2) thin window configuration. The authors describe herewith their recent experimental results on HBD research obtained with CsI photo-cathodes and HBD prototype beam testing in 1995.
Date: October 25, 1997
Creator: Chen, M.

Understanding Our Genetic Inheritance: The US Human Genome Project, the First Five Years FY 1991--1995

Description: The Human Genome Initiative is a worldwide research effort with the goal of analyzing the structure of human DNA and determining the location of the estimated 100,000 human genes. In parallel with this effort, the DNA of a set of model organisms will be studied to provide the comparative information necessary for understanding the functioning of the human genome. The information generated by the human genome project is expected to be the source book for biomedical science in the 21st century and will by of immense benefit to the field of medicine. It will help us to understand and eventually treat many of the more than 4000 genetic diseases that affect mankind, as well as the many multifactorial diseases in which genetic predisposition plays an important role. A centrally coordinated project focused on specific objectives is believed to be the most efficient and least expensive way of obtaining this information. The basic data produced will be collected in electronic databases that will make the information readily accessible on convenient form to all who need it. This report describes the plans for the U.S. human genome project and updates those originally prepared by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) and the National Research Council (NRC) in 1988. In the intervening two years, improvements in technology for almost every aspect of genomics research have taken place. As a result, more specific goals can now be set for the project.
Date: April 1, 1990