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Acceptance test report for 241-AW process air system

Description: The acceptance test procedure (ATP) for the compressed air system at building 241-AW-273 was completed on March 11, 1993. The system was upgraded to provide a reliable source of compressed air to the tank farm. The upgrade included the demolition of the existing air compressor and associated piping, as well as the installation of a new air compressor with a closed loop cooling system. A compressed air cross-tie was added to allow the process air compressor to function as a back-up to the existing instrument air compressor. The purpose of the ATP was to achieve three primary objectives: verify system upgrade in accordance with the design media; provide functional test of system components and controls; and prepare the system for the Operational Test. The ATP was successfully completed with thirteen exceptions, which were resolved prior to completing the acceptance test. The repaired exceptions had no impact to safety or the environment and are briefly summarized. Testing ensured that the system was installed per design, that its components function as required and that it is ready for operational testing and subsequent turnover to operations.
Date: October 6, 1994
Creator: Kostelnik, A. J.

''After the Genome 5 Conference'' to be held October 6-10, 1999 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Description: OAK B139 The postgenomic era is arriving faster than anyone had imagined--sometime during 2000 we'll have a large fraction of the human genome sequence. Heretofore, our understanding of function has come from non-industrial experiments whose conclusions were largely framed in human language. The advent of large amounts of sequence data, and of ''functional genomic'' data types such as mRNA expression data, have changed this picture. These data share the feature that individual observations and measurements are typically relatively low value adding. Such data is now being generated so rapidly that the amount of information contained in it will surpass the amount of biological information collected by traditional means. It is tantalizing to envision using genomic information to create a quantitative biology with a very strong data component. Unfortunately, we are very early in our understanding of how to ''compute on'' genomic information so as to extract biological knowledge from i t. In fact, some current efforts to come to grips with genomic information often resemble a computer savvy library science, where the most important issues concern categories, classification schemes, and information retrieval. When exploring new libraries, a measure of cataloging and inventory is surely inevitable. However, at some point we will need to move from library science to scholarship.We would like to achieve a quantitative and predictive understanding of biological function. We realize that making the bridge from knowledge of systems to the sets of abstractions that constitute computable entities is not easy. The After the Genome meetings were started in 1995 to help the biological community think about and prepare for the changes in biological research in the face of the oncoming flow of genomic information. The term ''After the Genome'' refers to a future in which complete inventories of the gene products of entire organisms become available.Since then, ...
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: Brent, Roger

"After the Genome 5, Conference to be held October 6-10, 1999, Jackson Hole, Wyoming"

Description: The postgenomic era is arriving faster than anyone had imagined-- sometime during 2000 we'll have a large fraction of the human genome sequence. Heretofore, our understanding of function has come from non-industrial experiments whose conclusions were largely framed in human language. The advent of large amounts of sequence data, and of "functional genomic" data types such as mRNA expression data, have changed this picture. These data share the feature that individual observations and measurements are typically relatively low value adding. Such data is now being generated so rapidly that the amount of information contained in it will surpass the amount of biological information collected by traditional means. It is tantalizing to envision using genomic information to create a quantitative biology with a very strong data component. Unfortunately, we are very early in our understanding of how to "compute on" genomic information so as to extract biological knowledge from it. In fact, some current efforts to come to grips with genomic information often resemble a computer savvy library science, where the most important issues concern categories, classification schemes, and information retrieval. When exploring new libraries, a measure of cataloging and inventory is surely inevitable. However, at some point we will need to move from library science to scholarship. We would like to achieve a quantitative and predictive understanding of biological function. We realize that making the bridge from knowledge of systems to the sets of abstractions that constitute computable entities is not easy. The After the Genome meetings were started in 1995 to help the biological community think about and prepare for the changes in biological research in the face of the oncoming flow of genomic information. The term �After the Genome� refers to a future in which complete inventories of the gene products of entire organisms become available. Since then, ...
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: Brent, Roger

Annual report on the US Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites for October 1991--September 1992

Description: This report summarizes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) cultural resource studies that were undertaken in support of the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in the state of Colorado for the period of October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report fulfills the DOE`s obligation to provide an annual report to the state of Colorado on the status and results of cultural resource studies conducted during the above period of record. This requirement is stated in a programmatic memorandum of agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Previous reports were based on a calendar year reporting period. However, in order to be more consistent with the programmatic memorandum of agreement, the period of record for this and subsequent annual reports has been changed to the Federal fiscal year. The current status and summaries of 1992 cultural resource surveys are provided for all UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. The sites are Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock.
Date: October 6, 1993

Annual report to Congress on Federal Government energy management and conservation programs, Fiscal year 1994

Description: This report provides sinformation on energy consumption in Federal buildings and operations and documents activities conducted by Federal agencies to meet statutory requirements of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act. It also describes energy conservation and management activities of the Federal Government under section 381 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. Implementation activities undertaken during FY94 by the Federal agencies under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and Executive Orders 12759 and 12902 are also described. During FY94, total (gross) energy consumption of the US Government, including energy consued to produce, process, and transport energy, was 1.72 quadrillion Btu. This represents {similar_to}2.0% of the total 85.34 quads used in US.
Date: October 6, 1995

Assessment of a magnet system combining the advantages of cable-in-conduit forced-flow and pool-boiling magnets

Description: This paper presents an idea for a magnet system that could be used to advantage in tokamaks and other fusion engineering devices. Higher performance designs, specifically newer tokamaks such as those for the international Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) use Cable in Conduit Conductor (CICC) forced flow coils to advantage to meet field and current density requirements. Pool boiling magnets lack structural integrity to resist high magnetic forces since helium cooling areas must surround each conductor. A second problem is that any leak can threaten the voltage standoff integrity of the magnet system. This is because a leak can result in low-pressure helium gas becoming trapped by limited conductance in the magnet bundle and low-pressure helium has poor dielectric strength. The system proposed here is basically a CICC system, with it`s inherent advantages, but bathed in higher pressure supercritical helium to eliminate the leak and voltage break-down problems. Schemes to simplify helium coolant plumbing with the proposed system are discussed. A brief historical review of related magnet systems is included. The advantages and disadvantages of using higher pressure, supercritical helium in combination with solid electrical insulation in a CICC system are discussed. Related electrical data from some previous works are compiled and discussed.
Date: October 6, 1993
Creator: Slack, D.; Hassenzahl, W.; Felker, B. & Chaplin, M.

Boundary plasma modeling for ITER. Final report, July 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

Description: Under this contract the authors have contributed to ITER edged plasma physics by improving the numerics and the organization of the B2.5 edge plasma code, by applying the code in a systematic study of the effect of deliberately introduced impurities upon the divertor heat load, by collaborating with colleagues at IPP Garching in their studies of the ITER divertor using the B2/EIRENE code system and in their model validation studies, and by kinetic studies of the possible beneficial effects of magnetic perturbations upon divertor heat load. In regard to the effect of recycling impurities their modeling indicates that it will be possible to radiate up to 200 MW in the edge plasma and divertor if the edge density is sufficiently high ({approx_equal} 6.0 {times} 10{sup 19}/m{sup 3}) and if there is maintained a concentration of 1.0% neon or 0.5% argon. This implies that an acceptable working point for ITER may just barely be possible with credit for bremsstrahlung and edge radiation alone, and a robust working point appears possible if consideration is given also to core plasma impurity radiation. In regard to the effect of magnetic perturbations they find that a scenario that relies on external windings requires coils no further than about 0.3 m outside the separatrix, which appears unacceptable given the radiation environment.
Date: October 6, 1995
Creator: Braams, B.J.

Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Quarterly report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

Description: The presence of potassium or calcium in sol gel catalysts increase the production of C{sub 4} hydrocarbon and that of methane while maintaining high activities. Characterization of catalysts using temperature programmed desorption of carbon dioxide indicates that activity and product distribution over an isosynthesis catalyst depend on its acid-base properties. Low activity was observed for catalysts with very weak basicity, and high oxygenate production for catalysts with strong basicity. An optimum strength of basic sites is crucial to achieve high activity while minimizing the amount of oxygenates. A kinetic model was developed based on the reaction mechanisms, and the simulation from the model produces reasonable fit with the experimental data.
Date: October 6, 1993
Creator: Anthony, R. G. & Akgerman, A.

Closed ThUOX Fuel Cycle for LWRs with ADTT (ATW) Backend for the 21st Century

Description: A future nuclear energy scenario with a closed, thorium-uranium-oxide (ThUOX) fuel cycle and new light water reactors (TULWRs) supported by Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) systems could provide several improvements beyond today's once-through, UO{sub 2}-fueled nuclear technology. A deployment scenario with TULWRs plus ATWs to burn the actinides produced by these LWRs and to close the back-end of the ThUOX fuel cycle was modeled to satisfy a US demand that increases linearly from 80 GWe in 2020 to 200 GWe by 2100. During the first 20 years of the scenario (2000-2020), nuclear energy production in the US declines from today's 100 GWe to about 80 GWe, in accordance with forecasts of the US DOE's Energy Information Administration. No new nuclear systems are added during this declining nuclear energy period, and all existing LWRs are shut down by 2045. Beginning in 2020, ATWs that transmute the actinides from existing LWRs are deployed, along with TULWRs and additional ATWs with a support ratio of 1 ATW to 7 TULWRs to meet the energy demand scenario. A final mix of 174 GWe from TULWRs and 26 GWe from ATWs provides the 200 GWe demand in 2100. Compared to a once-through LWR scenario that meets the same energy demand, the TULWR/ATW concept could result in the following improvements: depletion of natural uranium resources would be reduced by 50%; inventories of Pu which may result in weapons proliferation will be reduced in quantity by more than 98% and in quality because of higher neutron emissions and 50 times the alpha-decay heating of weapons-grade plutonium; actinides (and possibly fission products) for final disposal in nuclear waste would be substantially reduced; and the cost of fuel and the fuel cycle may be 20-30% less than the once-through UO{sub 2} fuel cycle.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Beller, D.E.; Sailor, W.C. & Venneri, F.

Cluster algorithms with empahsis on quantum spin systems

Description: The purpose of this lecture is to discuss in detail the generalized approach of Kawashima and Gubernatis for the construction of cluster algorithms. We first present a brief refresher on the Monte Carlo method, describe the Swendsen-Wang algorithm, show how this algorithm follows from the Fortuin-Kastelyn transformation, and re=interpret this transformation in a form which is the basis of the generalized approach. We then derive the essential equations of the generalized approach. This derivation is remarkably simple if done from the viewpoint of probability theory, and the essential assumptions will be clearly stated. These assumptions are implicit in all useful cluster algorithms of which we are aware. They lead to a quite different perspective on cluster algorithms than found in the seminal works and in Ising model applications. Next, we illustrate how the generalized approach leads to a cluster algorithm for world-line quantum Monte Carlo simulations of Heisenberg models with S = 1/2. More succinctly, we also discuss the generalization of the Fortuin- Kasetelyn transformation to higher spin models and illustrate the essential steps for a S = 1 Heisenberg model. Finally, we summarize how to go beyond S = 1 to a general spin, XYZ model.
Date: October 6, 1995
Creator: Gubernatis, J.E. & Kawashima, Naoki

Conference summary

Description: The conference began with an introductory lecture by Bunakov. It is very appropriate that this workshop be held in Dubna as Bunakov reminded us that the experiments that motivated the current interest in the study of symmetry violation with neutrons were started here at Dubna by Alfimenkov, Pikelner, and collaborators. Bunakov discussed the fact that is the complexity of the compound nucleus that leads to large enhancement of parity violation near P-resonances and to the possibility of using statistical models to relate the measured parity violation to more-fundamental quantities. He also pointed out that it is a rare case in which complexity aids us. Bunakov did not point out that this is an example of another rare phenomena -- where theory has predicted correctly in advance the parity violating effects seen near p-resonances. As long ago as 1969, Karmanov and Lobov first predicted an enhancement of {gamma}-ray circular polarization near p-resonances. Sushkov and Flambaum later predicted asymmetries P {approximately} 10{sup {minus}2} for p-resonances and suggested {sup 117}Sn, {sup 139}La, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 238}U for study. Bunakov and Gudkov developed a theory describing the energy dependence of parity-violating effects over a large energy range. This theory predicted random signs for the parity-violating asymmetries.
Date: October 6, 1993
Creator: Seestrom, S. J.

Conservation Spending in Agriculture: Trends and Implications

Description: Conservation spending under various federal agricultural statutes has increased since the early 1980s, and the mix of activities that are funded has changed during this time period. These funds have become an increasingly important source of income to farmers. This report examines conservation program funding since FY1983 in the context of both changing conservation policies and programs, and other farm program sources of income to farmers. This report will be updated if events warrant. Conservation Spending in Agriculture: Trends and Implications
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: Zinn, Jeffrey A.

Critical Infrastructure Protection: Fundamental Improvements Needed to Assure Security of Federal Operations

Description: Testimony issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO discussed the computer security aspects of critical infrastructure protection, focusing on federal agency performance in addressing computer security issues."
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.

Criticality assessment of LLRWDF closure

Description: During the operation of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF), large amounts (greater than 100 kg) of enriched uranium (EU) were buried. This EU came primarily from the closing and decontamination of the Naval Fuels Facility in the time period from 1987--1989. Waste Management Operations (WMO) procedures were used to keep the EU boxes separated to prevent possible criticality during normal operation. Closure of the LLRWDF is currently being planned, and waste stabilization by Dynamic Compaction (DC) is proposed. Dynamic compaction will crush the containers in the LLRWDF and result in changes in their geometry. Research of the LLRWDF operations and record keeping practices have shown that the EU contents of trenches are known, but details of the arrangement of the contents cannot be proven. Reviews of the trench contents, combined with analysis of potential critical configurations, revealed that some portions of the LLRWDF can be expected to be free of criticality concerns while other sections have credible probabilities for the assembly of a critical mass, even in the uncompacted configuration. This will have an impact on the closure options and which trenches can be compacted.
Date: October 6, 1992
Creator: Sarrack, A. G.; Weber, J. H. & Woody, N. D.

Criticality assessment of LLRWDF closure

Description: During the operation of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF), large amounts (greater than 100 kg) of enriched uranium (EU) were buried. This EU came primarily from the closing and decontamination of the Naval Fuels Facility in the time period from 1987--1989. Waste Management Operations (WMO) procedures were used to keep the EU boxes separated to prevent possible criticality during normal operation. Closure of the LLRWDF is currently being planned, and waste stabilization by Dynamic Compaction (DC) is proposed. Dynamic compaction will crush the containers in the LLRWDF and result in changes in their geometry. Research of the LLRWDF operations and record keeping practices have shown that the EU contents of trenches are known, but details of the arrangement of the contents cannot be proven. Reviews of the trench contents, combined with analysis of potential critical configurations, revealed that some portions of the LLRWDF can be expected to be free of criticality concerns while other sections have credible probabilities for the assembly of a critical mass, even in the uncompacted configuration. This will have an impact on the closure options and which trenches can be compacted.
Date: October 6, 1992
Creator: Sarrack, A. G.; Weber, J. H. & Woody, N. D.

Design, Fabrication, and Certification of Advanced Modular PV Power Systems Final Technical Progress Report

Description: This report describes the overall accomplishments and benefits of Solar Electric Specialties Co. (SES) under this Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract. SES addressed design issues related to their modular autonomous PV power supply (MAPPS) and a mobile photogenset. MAPPS investigations included gel-cell batteries mounted horizontally; redesign of the SES power supply; modified battery enclosure for increased safety and reduced cost; programmable, interactive battery charge controllers; and UL and FM listings. The photogenset systems incorporate generators, battery storage, and PV panels for a mobile power supply. The unit includes automatic oil-change systems for the propane generators, collapsible array mounts for the PV enclosure, and internal stowage of the arrays. Standardizing the products resulted in product lines of MAPPS and Photogensets that can be produced more economically and with shorter lead times, while increasing product quality and reliability. Product assembly and quality control have also been improved and streamlined with the development of standardized assembly processes and QC testing procedures. SES offers the UL-listed MAPPS at about the same price as its previous non-standardized, unlisted products.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Lambarski, T. & Minyard, G. (Solar Electric Specialties Co., Willits, California)

Design Study of the Extraction System of the 3rd Generation ECR Ion Source

Description: A design study for the extraction system of the 3rd Generation super conducting ECR ion source at LBNL is presented. The magnetic design of the ion source has a mirror field of 4 T at the injection and 3 T at the extraction side and a radial field of 2.4 T at the plasma chamber wall. Therefore, the ion beam formation takes place in a strong axial magnetic field. Furthermore the axial field drops from 3 T to 0.4 T within the first 30 cm. The influence of the high magnetic field on the ion beam extraction and matching to the beam line is investigated. The extraction system is first simulated with the 2D ion trajectory code IGUN with an estimated mean charge state of the extracted ion beam. These results are then compared with the 2D code AXCEL-INP, which can simulate the extraction of ions with different charge states. Finally, the influence of the strong magnetic hexapole field is studied with the three dimensional ion optics code KOBRA. The introduced tool set can be used to optimize the extraction system of the super conducting ECR ion source.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Leitner, M.A.; Lyneis, C.M.; Taylor, C.E.; Wutte, D. & Xie, Z.Q.

Development of Graphical User Interfaces to Visualize Meteorological Data

Description: The availability of meteorological data in various forms has increased in recent years due to improved communication and expanded computational storage. At the Savannah River Technology Center of the Savannah River Site, a considerable amount of data form Weather Services International is collected and archived on a daily basis.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Buckley, R.L.

The Effect of High-Resistance SnO2 on CdS/CdTe Device Performance

Description: In this paper, we have studied the effect of high-resistance SnO2 buffer layers, deposited by low-pressure chemical-vapor deposition, on CdS/CdTe device performance. Our results indicate that when CdS/CdTe devices have a very thin layer of CdS or no CdS at all, the i-SnO2 buffer layer helps to increase device efficiency. When the CdS layer is thicker than 600{angstrom}, the device performance is dominated by CdS thickness, not the i-SnO2 layer. If a very thin CdS layer is to be used to enhance device performance, we conclude that a better SnO2 buffer layer is needed.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Li, W.; Ribelin, R.; Mahathongdy, Y.; Albin, D.; Dhere, R.; Rose, D. et al.

The Effect of Laser Surface Reconstruction of Disordered Carbons on Performance

Description: The reconstruction of the surface of disordered carbons was examined by heating carbons derived from polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN) and divinylbenzene (DVB) with a pulsed infrared laser in an argon or helium atmosphere, both fluidized and under static conditions. By graphitizing the outer surface of the carbons, it was hoped to reduce the high first-cycle losses associated with such disordered materials in Li-ion cells. The power to the sample was varied to observed the effects on surface morphology and electrochemical performance in 1M LiPF{sub 6} ethylene carbonate-dimethyl carbonate. The use various reactive atmosphere such as ethylene, 2-vinylpyridine, pyrrole, and furfuryl alcohol were also evaluated as an alternative means of hopefully forming a thin graphitic layer on the carbon particles to reduce first-cycle irreversibility. While some improvement was realized, these losses were still unacceptably high. The laser heating did improve the rate capabilities of the carbons, however. More work in this area is necessary to fully understand surface and bulk effects.
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: EVEN JR., WILLIAM R. & GUIDOTTI, RONALD A.

Efficient Control Law Simulation for Multiple Mobile Robots

Description: In this paper we consider the problem of simulating simple control laws involving large numbers of mobile robots. Such simulation can be computationally prohibitive if the number of robots is large enough, say 1 million, due to the 0(N2 ) cost of each time step. This work therefore uses hierarchical tree-based methods for calculating the control law. These tree-based approaches have O(NlogN) cost per time step, thus allowing for efficient simulation involving a large number of robots. For concreteness, a decentralized control law which involves only the distance and bearing to the closest neighbor robot will be considered. The time to calculate the control law for each robot at each time step is demonstrated to be O(logN).
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Driessen, B. J.; Feddema, J. T.; Kotulski, J. D. & Kwok, K. S.

Environmental implementation plan: Chapter 14, Environmental compliance tracking and data management. Revision

Description: Environmental projects, issues, and programs have become increasingly important to the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) management and the Department of Energy (DOE). A compliance-tracking system has been developed to monitor environmental requirements and commitments because they have become increasingly complex and numerous. An Environmental Data Management (EDM) steering committee was formed in October 1987 to develop computer system solutions to environmental needs. The committee`s main objective is to coordinate, within SRS divisions, the separate efforts that have been or are being developed to meet regulatory requirements and specific programmatic goals. The Environmental and Graphical Information Systems (E&GIS) Program was recently developed to establish a more formal organizational structure and enhance the coordination of geographical information systems (GIS) and environmental data management (EDM) activities at SRS. The general strategy of the program is to establish a coordination focal point for GIS and EDM activities, to provide for the integration of the several environmental and graphical information systems which exist mostly in stand-alone arrangements, and to guide the development of data management and geographical information applications in order to achieve alignment with Site computing architecture and standards. The E&GIS Program will enhance the Site`s ability to respond to data requirements in support of new missions, changing directives, and increasing regulatory requirements.
Date: October 6, 1993
Creator: Story, C. H.