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Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies: Second Quarter 1995

Description: This issue focuses on the Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) which is a collaboration of many of the DOE national laboratories to provide a scientific environment to research multiple sensors and the new information that can be derived from them. The bulk of the research has been directed at nonproliferation applications, but it has also proven useful in environmental monitoring and assessment, and land/water management. The contents of this issue are: using AMPS technology to detect proliferation and monitor resources; combining multisensor data to monitor facilities and natural resources; planning a AMPS mission; SAR pod produces images day or night, rain or shine; MSI pod combines data from multiple sensors; ESI pod will analyze emissions and effluents; and accessing AMPS information on the Internet.
Date: Summer 1995
Creator: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, August 1999.

Description: With the end of summer drawing near, the fall songbird migration season will soon begin. Scientists with the ARM Program will be able to observe the onset of the migration season as interference in the radar wind profiler (RWP) data. An RWP measures vertical profiles of wind and temperature directly above the radar from approximately 300 feet to 3 miles above the ground. The RWP accomplishes this by sending a pulse of electromagnetic energy skyward. Under normal conditions, the energy is scattered by targets in the atmosphere. Targets generally consist of atmospheric irregularities such as variations in temperature, humidity, and pressure over relatively short distances. During the spring and fall bird migration seasons, RWP beam signals are susceptible to overflying birds. The radar beams do not harm the birds, but the birds' presence hampers data collection by providing false targets to reflect the RWP beam, introducing errors into the data. Because of the wavelength of the molar beam, the number of individuals, and the small size of songbirds' bodies (compared to the larger geese or hawks), songbirds are quite likely to be sampled by the radar. Migrating birds usually fly with the prevailing wind, making their travel easier. As a result, winds from the south are ''enhanced'' or overestimated in the spring as the migrating birds travel northward, and winds from the north are overestimated in the fall as birds make their way south. This fact is easily confirmed by comparison of RWP wind data to wind data gathered by weather balloons, which are not affected by birds.
Date: September 3, 1999
Creator: Sisterson, D.L.

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 1999.

Description: Summer research efforts continue in July with the SGP99 Hydrology Campaign headed by the US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. Other participants are the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the ARM Program. This campaign focuses on measuring soil moisture by using satellite-based instruments and takes place July 7--22, 1999. Soil moisture is an important component of Earth's hydrologic cycle and climate, but the understanding of it and the ability to measure it accurately are limited. Scientists need to understand soil moisture better so that it can be incorporated correctly into general circulation models. As an important factor in growing crops, soil moisture dictates a farmer's success or failure. Too much soil moisture can drown out croplands and cause flooding, whereas too little can lead to drought conditions, robbing crops of their life-supporting water. Decisions about which crops to plant and other land use issues depend on the understanding of soil moisture patterns. Soil moisture can be measured in various ways. ARM employs several direct methods using soil moisture probes buried from 1 inch to 6.5 feet below the surface. One type of probe has two stainless steel screens separated by a piece of fiberglass. Electrical resistance, which is a function of soil moisture content, is measured between the screens. Another type of probe measures soil temperature and the increase in temperature after the soil is heated by small heating element. From this measurement, the volume of water in the soil can be calculated.
Date: July 30, 1999
Creator: Sisterson, D. L.

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Facilities Newsletter - June 1999.

Description: The Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) Campaign is underway at the SGL CART site and will continue through September 1999. This field study is investigating the small-scale physics of precipitation and the convective dynamics of MCSs in the middle latitudes. An MCS is defined as a precipitation system that is 10--300 miles wide and contains deep convection at some time in its life span. MCSs occur in the midlatitudes of the US and can include large, isolated thunderstorms, squall lines, and mesoscale convective complexes.
Date: July 15, 1999
Creator: Holdridge, D. J., ed. & Sisterson, D. L.

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, October 1999

Description: This newsletter contains two articles. The first is about problems at the 60-ft. instrument tower at Okmulgee State Park. Wasps have taken up residency at the tower which has hampered maintenance work there. The second article describes the cloud layer experiment at the Oklahoma site.
Date: November 8, 1999
Creator: Sisterson, D.L.

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Facilities Newsletter - September 1999

Description: The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program September 1999 Facilities Newsletter discusses the several Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) that the ARM SGP CART site will host in the near future. Two projects of note are the International Pyrgeometer Intercomparison and the Fall Single Column Model (SCM)/Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL) IOP. Both projects will bring many US and international scientists to the SGP CART site to participate in atmospheric research.
Date: September 27, 1999
Creator: Holdridge, D. J., ed

Atmospheric Radiation Measurements Program facilities newsletter, November 1999

Description: This newletter begins a discussion on Lightning--Natures's light show. This issue explains what lightning is. Fortunately, lightning strikes on ARM's instruments occurs infrequently. Next month's issue will explain lightning safety and how ARM has dealt with lightning safety.
Date: December 7, 1999
Creator: Sisterson, D.L.

Biofuels News--Winter 1998, Vol.1, No. 1

Description: This is the debut of another innovative NREL publication whose mission is to advance the development and commercialization of alternative fuels, this time on behalf of DOE's Office of Fuels Development (OFD)(a division of the Office of Transportation Technologies). NREL is one of two federal laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory is the other) whose R&D successes have helped to promote ethanol as a cost-competitive alternative to gasoline. Ethanol use is also seen as an effective solution to the greenhouse gas problem.
Date: January 1, 1998

Buildings for the 21st Century Newsletter: Fall 1999, Vol. 2, No. 1

Description: This edition contains more information about new efforts and programs in DOE's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS), and highlights the evolution of a new approach to making buildings more energy-efficient, comfortable, and affordable.
Date: November 22, 1999
Creator: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (U.S.)

Buildings for the 21st Century Newsletter, Volume 1: News You Can Use

Description: This is the first edition of the Buildings for the 21st Century newsletter which is designed for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy stakeholders with interest in the Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS).
Date: June 4, 1999
Creator: Strawn, N.; Eber, K. & Jones, J.

Electric Power Monthly: August 1995

Description: Monthly publication containing statistical data at state, census division, and U.S. levels regarding "net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity quality and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant" (p. iii).
Date: August 16, 1995
Creator: United States. Energy Information Administration.

Energy & Technology Review, July 1993

Description: This report discusses the two-stage light-gas gun which was developed by the Super-High-Altitude Research Project (SHARP) is a step toward realizing a launcher that can do this at a fraction of the cost of rockets. The SHARP gun is different from other two-stage designs because it is larger and its launch and pump tube are joined at right angles. This configuration allows the launch tube to point at any angle toward the sky while the pump tube remains horizontal. We have demonstrated that this gun can fire projectiles when the launch tube is in the horizontal position. Dr. Michael M. May who was the Laboratory`s fifth Director (1965--71) and is now a Director Emeritus. Under his directorship, the groundwork was laid for the Laboratory`s Energy Program, environmental science programs, and Laser Program. May remains active in research on arms control, nonproliferation, and cooperative security, and he is doing research and teaching at UC San Diego and at Stanford University. As part of the Laboratory`s 40th anniversary celebration, May was invited to lecture on his views of the changing world and the role of LLNL. In 1992, he participated in an influential National Academy of Sciences study on the reduction of nuclear weapons. This study recommended that the US cut strategic weapons to one-third the present number, withdraw most tactical weapons, and dismantle the retired nuclear weapons. May is convinced that the relative stability now present among the major nations is a precondition for keeping the demand for nuclear weapons low among the nuclear ``have-not`` nations. In the coming years, May believes that the Laboratory will remain most useful at major government-funded R&D projects in the areas of defense, energy, and the environment. May is now working on a new report on the disposition of surplus plutonium from nuclear weapons.
Date: July 1, 1993
Creator: Quirk, W. J.

Energy & Technology Review, August 1993

Description: The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, we other major programs have been added including laser fusion, and laser isotope separation, biomedical and environmental science, strategic defense and applied energy technology. These programs, in turn, require research in basic scientific disciplines, including chemistry and materials science, computer science and technology, engineering and physics. In this issue, Herald Brown, the Laboratory`s third director and now counselor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, reminisces about his years at Livermore and comments about the Laboratory`s role in the future. Also an article on visualizing dynamic systems in three dimensions is presented. Researchers can use our interactive algorithms to translate massive quantities of numerical data into visual form and can assign the visual markers of their choice to represent three- dimensional phenomena in a two-dimensional setting, such as a monitor screen. Major work has been done in the visualization of climate modeling, but the algorithms can be used for visualizing virtually any phenomena.
Date: August 1, 1993
Creator: Quirk, W. J.

Energy & Technology Review, November--December 1993

Description: For the 40-plus years of the Cold War, both the United States and the Soviet Union built up nuclear stockpiles of tens of thousands of weapons. Now, as the Cold War has ended and tensions between the superpowers have subsided, the US faces the task of significantly reducing its nuclear arsenal. Many thousands of nuclear weapons are being removed from the stockpile as a result of recent treaties and unilateral decisions. This issue of Energy and Technology Review describes the Laboratory`s role in the nation`s effort to dismantle these weapons safely and rapidly. The dismantlement of the United States` nuclear weapons takes place at the Department of Energy`s Pantex facility near Amarillo, Texas. The first article in this issue summarizes the Laboratory`s involvement in dismantling Livermore-designed nuclear weapons. LLNL (like Los Alamos) has responsibility for the weapons it designed, from design concept to retirement. In the past, the responsibilities ended when the weapon was retired from the stockpile. Now however, the role has been extended to include dismantlement. The second article reports on an incident that occurred in November 1992, in which the pit of a W48 warhead cracked during dismantlement. The Laboratory was called upon to handle the pit safely and determine the causes of the cracking. The third article explores a variety of methods proposed for reusing the high explosives after they are removed from the weapon. In the past, Laboratory work on nuclear weapons focused primarily on design and development. However, as the size and composition of the US stockpile changes with evolving international conditions, they will be called upon with increasing frequency to provide the scientific and technical expertise needed to dismantle the nation`s retired nuclear weapons safely and efficiently.
Date: November 1, 1993
Creator: Quirk, W. J.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R. D.; Kroopnick, H. et al.

Energy & Technology Review, January-February 1994

Description: This issue highlights the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s 1993 accomplishments in our mission areas and core programs: economic competitiveness, national security, energy, the environment, lasers, biology and biotechnology, engineering, physics, chemistry, materials science, computers and computing, and science and math education. Secondary topics include: nonproliferation, arms control, international security, environmental remediation, and waste management.
Date: April 1, 1994
Creator: Quirk, W. J.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R. D.; Kroopnick, H. et al.

Energy & Technology Review, March 1994

Description: This monthly report of research activities at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory highlights three different research programs. First, the Forensic Science Center supports a broad range of analytical techniques that focus on detecting and analyzing chemical, biological, and nuclear species. Analyses are useful in the areas of nonproliferation, counterterrorism, and law enforcement. Second, starting in 1977, the laboratory initiated a series of studies to understand a high incidence of melanoma among employees. Continued study shows that mortality from this disease has decreased from the levels seen in the 1980`s. Third, to help coordinate the laboratory`s diverse research projects that can provide better healthcare tools to the public, the lab is creating the new Center for Healthcare Technologies.
Date: March 1, 1994
Creator: Quirk, W. J.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R. D.; Kroopnick, H. et al.

Energy & Technology Review, April 1994

Description: The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, other major programs have been added, including technology transfer, laser science, biology and biotechnology, environmental research and remediation, arms control and nonproliferation, advanced defense technology, and applied energy technology. These programs in turn require research in basic scientific disciplines including chemistry, and materials science, computing science and technology, engineering and physics. This review highlights two R&D 100 award winning research topics: (1) The world`s fastest digitizer which captures 30 ps transient electrical events, and (2) the MACHO camera system which fully exploits the power of large format digital imagers and integrates into one package the taking and analysis of images at a prodigious rate and the storage and archiving of extensive amounts of data. (GHH)
Date: April 1, 1994
Creator: Quirk, W. J.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R. D; McElroy, L. et al.

Energy & Technology Review, October 1994

Description: Two articles are included: the industrial computing initiative, and artificial hip joints (applying weapons expertise to medical technology). Three research highlights (briefs) are included: KEN project (face recognition), modeling groundwater flow and chemical migration, and gas and oil national information infrastructure.
Date: October 1, 1994
Creator: Bookless, W. A.; McElroy, L.; Wheatcraft, D.; Middleton, C. & Shang, S.

LLW Notes, Volume 10, Number 3, April/May 1995

Description: Newsletter distributed to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum members describing current news, policies, and legislation, as well as other information relevant to the management of low-level radioactive waste.
Date: May 5, 1995
Creator: Afton Associates, Inc.

LLW Notes, Volume 10, Number 4, June 1995

Description: Newsletter distributed to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum members describing current news, policies, and legislation, as well as other information relevant to the management of low-level radioactive waste.
Date: June 28, 1995
Creator: Afton Associates, Inc.

LLW Notes, Volume 10, Number 5, July 1995

Description: Newsletter distributed to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum members describing current news, policies, and legislation, as well as other information relevant to the management of low-level radioactive waste.
Date: July 31, 1995
Creator: Afton Associates, Inc.

LLW Notes, Volume 10, Number 6, August/September 1995

Description: Newsletter distributed to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum members describing current news, policies, and legislation, as well as other information relevant to the management of low-level radioactive waste.
Date: September 18, 1995
Creator: Afton Associates, Inc.

News-Notes, Number 19, March 1992

Description: Bulletin providing information and news about the condition of the water-related environment, the control of nonpoint sources of water pollution (NPS), and the ecosystem-driven management and restoration of watersheds in the United States.
Date: March 1992
Creator: United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Water.