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0.5 μm E/D AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure field effect transistor technology with DFET threshold adjust implant

Description: A doped-channel heterostructure field effect transistor (H-FET) technology has been developed with self-aligned refractory gate processing and using both enhancement- and depletion-mode transistors. D-HFET devices are obtained with a threshold voltage adjust implant into material designed for E-HFET operation. Both E- and D-HFETs utilize W/WSi bilayer gates, sidewall spacers, and rapid thermal annealing for controlling short channel effects. The 0.5 {mu}m E- HFETs (D-HFETs) have been demonstrated with transconductance of 425 mS/mm (265-310 mS/mm) and f{sub t} of 45-50 GHz. Ring oscillator gate delays of 19 ps with a power of 0.6 mW have been demonstrated using direct coupled FET logic. These results are comparable to previous doped-channel HFET devices and circuits fabricated by selective reactive ion etching rather than ion implantation for threshold voltage adjustment.
Date: April 1997
Creator: Baca, A. G.; Sherwin, M. E.; Zolper, J. C.; Shul, R. J.; Briggs, R. D.; Heise, J. A. et al.

0-G experiments with advanced ceramic fabric wick structures

Description: Both Air Force and NASA future spacecraft thermal management needs span the temperature range from cryogenic to liquid metals. Many of these needs are changing and not well defined and will remain so until goals, technology, and missions converge. Nevertheless, it is certain that high-temperature (> 800 K) and medium-temperature (about 450 K) radiator systems will have to be developed that offer significant improvements over current designs. This paper discusses experiments performed in the lower temperature regime as part of a comprehensive advanced ceramic fabric (ACF) heat pipe development program. These experiments encompassed wicking tests with various ceramic fabric samples, and heat transfer tests with a 1-m long prototype ACF water heat pipe. A prototype ceramic fabric/titanium water heat pipe has been constructed and tested; it transported up to 60 W of power at about 390 K. Startup and operation both with and against gravity examined. Wick testing was begun to aid in the design and construction of an improved prototype heat pipe, with a 38-{mu}m stainless steel linear covered by a biaxially-braided Nextel (trademark of the 3M Co., St. Paul, Minnesota) sleeve that is approximately 300-{mu}m thick. Wick testing took place in 1-g; limited testing in 0-g was initiated, and results to date suggest that in 0-g, wick performance improves over that in 1-g.
Date: July 1991
Creator: Antoniak, Z.I.; Webb, B.J.; Bates, J.M.; Cooper, M.F. & Pauley, K.A.

1.2 MW klystron for Asymmetric Storage Ring B Factory

Description: A cw klystron operating at 476 MHz has been developed jointly by SLAC and Varian Associates. The unique set of characteristics of this tube were strongly guided by requirements of the fast feedback necessary to prevent oscillations of the storage ring beams caused by the detuned accelerating cavity. This requires a combination of bandwidth and short group delay within the klystron. The RF feedback stabilization scheme also requires amplitude modulation making it necessary to operate the klystron about 10% below saturation. Performance specifications and initial operating results are presented.
Date: March 1995
Creator: Fowkes, W. R.; Caryotakis, G. & Doyle, E.

A 1.5 GeV compact light source with superconducting bending magnets

Description: This paper describes the design of a compact electron synchrotron light source for producing X-rays for medical imaging, protein crystallography, nano-machining and other uses up to 35 keV. The source will provide synchrotron light from six 6.9 tesla superconducting 60{degree} bending magnet stations. In addition the ring, contains conventional quadrupoles and sextupoles. The light source has a circumference of 26 meters, which permits it to be located in a variety of industrial and medical facilities.
Date: May 1995
Creator: Garren, A. A.; Cline, D. B.; Kolonko, J. J.; Green, M. A.; Johnson, D. E.; Leung, E. M. et al.

A 1.8 K test facility for superconducting RF cavities

Description: To demonstrate the feasibility of superconducting RF technology for a high energy e{sup +}/e{sup {minus}} collider, a research and development program has begun with collaborators from Europe, Asia, and North America. The immediate goal of the R&D program is to build and operate a 50 meter-long linac at DESY with 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavities at a temperature of 1.8 K - 2.0 K and an accelerating gradient of 15 MV/meter. The refrigeration for the test system at DESY initially will have a capacity of about 100 W at 1.8 K, distributed among three test cryostats. In a second step, refrigeration will be upgraded to 200 W at 1.8 K in order to supply the 50 meter test linac. This paper describes the cryogenics of this test system.
Date: April 1, 1994
Creator: Horlitz, G.; Knopf, U.; Lange, R.; Petersen, B.; Sellmann, D.; Trines, D. et al.

1-GeV Linac Upgrade Study at Fermilab

Description: A linac injector for a new proton source complex at Fermilab is assumed to have a kinetic energy of 1 GeV. This linac would be sized to accelerate 100 mA of H{sup -} beam in a 200 microsecond pulse at a 15 Hz repetition rate. This would be adequate to produce {approximately}10{sup 14} protons per pulse allowing for future improvements of the new proton source complex. An alternate proposal is to add 600 MeV of side coupled cavity linac at 805 MHz to the existing 400 MeV Linac. This addition may either be in a new location or use the present Booster tunnel. A discussion of these possibilities will be given.
Date: September 1998
Creator: Popovic, M.; Moretti, A.; Noble, R. & Schmidt, C. W.

1/m<sub>c</sub> Terms in lambda<sup>+</sup><sub>c</sub> Semileptonic Decays

Description: We use the heavy quark effective theory to investigate the form factors that describe the semileptonic decays lambda<sup>+</sup><sub>c</sub> -> lambda e<sup>+</sup> nu, to order 1/m<sub>c</sub>. We find that a total of four form factors are needed to this order, in contrast with two form factors to leading order, and six form factors in the most general case. We point out some relationships that arise among the general form factors.
Date: February 1, 1992
Creator: Roberts, Winston

O(1/M{sup 3}) effects for heavy-light mesons in lattice NRQCD

Description: The masses of spin-singlet and spin-triplet S-wave mesons containing a single heavy quark are computed in the quenched approximation. The light quark action and gauge field action are both classically-improved and tadpole-improved, and the couplings to the heavy quark are organized by the 1/M expansion of tadpole-improved NRQCD. At each of two lattice spacings, near 0.22fm and 0.26fm, meson masses are obtained for heavy quarks spanning the region between charmed and bottom mesons. Results up to O(1/M), O(1/M{sup 2})and O(1/M{sup 3}) are displayed separately, so that the convergence of the heavy quark expansion can be discussed. Also, the effect of each term in the O(1/M{sup 3}) contribution is computed individually. For bottom mesons the 1/M-expansion appears to be satisfactory, but the situation for charmed mesons is less clear.
Date: March 1998
Creator: Lewis, Randy & Woloshyn, R. M.

1 MeV electron irradiation of solid Xe nanoclusters in Al : an in-situ HRTEM study.

Description: Thin film samples of a simple embedded nanocluster system consisting of solid Xe precipitates in Al have been subjected to 1 MeV electron irradiation in a high-voltage electron microscope. High-resolution images have been recorded on videotape in order to monitor the changes to the system resulting from the passage of electrons through the film. Inspection of the video recordings (in some cases frame-by-frame) reveals that complex, rapid processes occur under the electron beam. These include, movement of small clusters, coalescence of neighboring clusters, shape changes, the apparent melting and resolidification of the Xe, and the creation and annealing of extended defects within the Xe lattice. A tentative interpretation of some of the observations is presented in terms of the electron-induced displacement processes at the surface of the clusters.
Date: December 5, 1997
Creator: Donnelly, S. E.; Furuya, K.; Song, M.; Birtcher, R. C. & Allen, C. W.

1 nA beam position monitoring system

Description: A system has been developed at Jefferson Lab for measuring transverse position of very low current beams delivered to the Experimental Hall B of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). At the heart of the system is a position sensitive cavity operating at 1497 MHz. The cavity utilizes a unique design which achieves a high sensitivity to beam position at a relatively low cavity Q. The cavity output RF signal is processed using a down-converter and a commercial lock-in amplifier operating at 100 kHz. The system interfaces with a VME based EPICS control system using the IEEE, 488 bus. The main features of the system are simple and robust design, and wide dynamic range capable of handling beam currents from 1 nA to 1000 nA with an expected resolution better than 100 {mu}m. This paper outlines the design of the system.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Ursic, R.; Flood, R. & Piller, C.

A 1- to 5-MW, RCS-based, short-pulse spallation neutron source

Description: Two accelerator configurations, the linac/compressor ring scheme and the linac/RCS scheme, are commonly used to provide the proton beam power for a short-pulse spallation neutron source. In one configuration, a full-power linac provides the beam power and a compressor ring shortens the pulse length from 1-ms down to 1 {micro}s. In the other, rapid cycling synchrotrons (RCSs) provide the beam power and also shorten the pulse length. A feasibility study of a staged approach to a 5-MW proton source utilizing RCS technology, allowing intermediate operation at 1 MW, was performed at ANL and is presented in this paper. This study is complementary to a study in progress at ORNL based on a linac and an accumulator ring. The 1-MW facility consists of a 400-MeV injector linac that delivers 0.5-mA time-averaged current, a synchrotron that accelerates the beam to 2 GeV at a 30-Hz rate, and two neutron-generating target stations. In the second phase, the 2-GeV beam is accelerated to 10 GeV by a larger RCS, increasing the facility beam power to 5 MW.
Date: June 1997
Creator: Cho, Y.; Chae, Y.-C. & Crosbie, E.

1-watt composite-slab Er:YAG laser. Revision 1

Description: A diode-side-pumped discrete-optic Er{sup 3+} :YAG laser employs pump-light coupling through a sapphire plate diffusion-bonded to the laser slab, removing heat directly at the pump face of the slab instead of requiring conduction through to its far side. This lowers the temperature in the gain region and gives reduced thermal lensing, which produces exceptional beam quality (M{sup 2} {approx} 1.3) at output powers {approx} 0.3 Watt. Powers above 1 Watt have been demonstrated with peak slope efficiencies {approx}20%. The novel architecture is also applicable to other side-pumped lasers.
Date: February 13, 1997
Creator: Page, R. H.; Bartels, R. A.; Beach, R. J.; Sutton, S. B.; Furu, L. H. & LaSala, J. E.

A 2--4 nm Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using the SLAC linac

Description: We describe the use of the SLAC linac to drive a unique, powerful. short wavelength Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Operating as an FEL, lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a high peak current electron beam through a long undulator by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The main components are a high-brightness rf photocathode electron gun; pulse compressors; about 1/5 of the SLAC linac; and a long undulator with a FODO quadrupole focussing system. Using electrons below 8 GeV, the system would operate at wavelengths down to about 3 nm, producing {ge}10 GW peak power in sub-ps pulses. At a 120 Hz rate the average power is {approx} 1 W.
Date: May 1, 1993
Creator: Winick, H.; Bane, K. & Boyce, R.

A 2.14 ms candidate optical pulsar in SN1987A: Ten years after

Description: We have monitored Supernova 1987A in optical/near-infrared bands from a few weeks following its birth until the present time in order to search for a pulsar remnant. We have found an apparent pattern of emission near the frequency of 467.5 Hz - a 2.14 ms pulsar candidate, first detected in data taken on the remnant at the Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) 2.5-m Dupont telescope during 14-16 Feb. 1992 UT. We detected further signals near the 2.14 ms period on numerous occasions over the next four years in data taken with a variety of telescopes, data systems and detectors, at a number of ground- and space-based observatories. The sequence of detections of this signal from Feb. `92 through August `93, prior to its apparent subsequent fading, is highly improbable (< 10{sup -10} for any noise source). We also find evidence for modulation of the 2.14 ms period with a {approx}1,000 s period which, when taken with the high spindown of the source (2-3 x 10{sup -10} Hz/s), is consistent with precession and spindown via gravitational radiation of a neutron star with a non- axisymmetric oblateness of {approx}10{sup -6}, and an implied gravitational luminosity exceeding that of the Crab Nebula pulsar by an order of magnitude.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Middleditch, J.; Kristian, J.A.; Kunkel, W.E.; Hill, K.M. & Watson, R.D.

2-D and 3-D computations of curved accelerator magnets

Description: In order to save computer memory, a long accelerator magnet may be computed by treating the long central region and the end regions separately. The dipole magnets for the injector synchrotron of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), employ magnet iron consisting of parallel laminations, stacked with a uniform radius of curvature of 33.379 m. Laplace's equation for the magnetic scalar potential has a different form for a straight magnet (x-y coordinates), a magnet with surfaces curved about a common center (r-{theta} coordinates), and a magnet with parallel laminations like the APS injector dipole. Yet pseudo 2-D computations for the three geometries give basically identical results, even for a much more strongly curved magnet. Hence 2-D (x-y) computations of the central region and 3-D computations of the end regions can be combined to determine the overall magnetic behavior of the magnets. 1 ref., 6 figs.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Turner, L.R.

2-D Axisymmetric Line Transport

Description: The methods used in the ALTAIR code for computing the transfer of spectral line radiation in two-dimensional axially-symmetric geometry are described. ALTAIR uses a variable-Eddington-tensor approach, in which the transfer equation of non-coherent line scattering is written in moment form, and the moments are closed with an assumed tensor relating the monochromatic pressure tensor and energy density; this Eddington tensor is obtained self-consistently using an accurate angle-dependent solution of the transfer equation. The finite element method for solving the moment system, and the discontinuous finite element method for solving the S{sub n} equation of transfer are described. Two applications of the method are discussed: line formation in uniform cylinders with different length-diameter ratios, and monochromatic transfer on an irregular x-y mesh (the Mordant test problem). 13 refs., 2 figs.
Date: November 20, 1990
Creator: Castor, John I.; Dykema, Pieter G & Klein, Richard I.

2-D electric fields and drifts near the magnetic separatrix in divertor tokamaks

Description: A 2-D calculation is presented for the transport of plasma in the edge region of a divertor tokamak solving continuity, momentum, and energy balance fluid equations. The model uses anomalous radial diffusion, including perpendicular ion momentum, and classical cross-field drifts transport. Parallel and perpendicular currents yield a self-consistent electrostatic potential on both sides of the magnetic separatrix. Outside the separatrix, the simulation extends to material divertor plates where the incident plasma is recycled as neutral gas and where the plate sheath and parallel currents dominate the potential structure. Inside the separatrix, various radial current terms - from viscosity, charge-exchange and poloidal damping, inertia, and {triangledown}B - contribute to the determining the potential. The model rigorously enforces cancellation of gyro-viscous and magnetization terms from the transport equations. The results emphasize the importance of E x B particle flow under the X-point which depends on the sign of the toroidal magnetic field. Radial electric field (E{sub y}) profiles at the outer midplane are small with weak shear when high L-mode diffusion coefficients are used and are large with strong shear when smaller H-mode diffusion coefficients are used. The magnitude and shear of the electric field (E{sub y}) is larger both when the core toroidal rotation is co-moving with the inductive plasma current and when the ion {triangledown}B-drift is towards the single-null X-point.
Date: November 15, 1998
Creator: Mattor, N.; Porter, G. D.; Rognlien, T. D. & Ryutov, D. D.

2-D Finite Element Cable and Box IEMP Analysis

Description: A 2-D finite element code has been developed for the solution of arbitrary geometry cable SGEMP and box IEMP problems. The quasi- static electric field equations with radiation- induced charge deposition and radiation-induced conductivity y are numerically solved on a triangular mesh. Multiple regions of different dielectric materials and multiple conductors are permitted.
Date: December 17, 1998
Creator: Scivner, G.J. & Turner, C.D.

A 2-D Self-Consistent DSMC Model for Chemically Reacting Low Pressure Plasma Reactors

Description: This paper will focus on the methodology of using a 2D plasma Direct Simulation Monte Carlo technique to simulate the species transport in an inductively coupled, low pressure, chemically reacting plasma system. The pressure in these systems is typically less than 20 mtorr with plasma densities of approximately 10{sup 17} {number_sign}/m{sup 3} and an ionization level of only 0.1%. This low ionization level tightly couples the neutral, ion, and electron chemistries and interactions in a system where the flow is subsonic. We present our strategy and compare simulation results to experimental data for Cl{sub 2} in a Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell modified with an inductive coil.
Date: June 17, 1999
Creator: Bartel, Timothy J.; Economou, Demetre & Johannes, Justine E.

2-D tomography with bolometry in DIII-D

Description: We have installed a 48-channel platinum-foil bolometer system on DIII-D achieve better spatial and temporal resolution of the radiated power in diverted discharges. Two 24-channel arrays provide complete plasma coverage with optimized views of the divertor. We have measured the divertor radiation profile for a series of radiative divertor and power balance experiments. We observe a rapid change in the magnitude and distribution of divertor radiation with heavy gas puffing. Unfolding the radiation profile with only two views requires us to treat the core and divertor radiation separately. The core radiation is fitted to a function of magnetic flux and is then subtracted from the divertor viewing chords. The divertor profile is then fit to a 2-D spline as a function of magnetic flux and poloidal angle.
Date: July 1, 1994
Creator: Leonard, A. W.; Meyer, W. H.; Geer, B.; Behne, D. M. & Hill, D. N.

A 2-GHz Rectangular Corrugated Horn

Description: We have designed, constructed and tested a large, rectangular horn antenna with a center frequency of 2.0 GHz, corrugated on the E-plane walls, made out of aluminum sheet. A new technique has been developed to solder thin aluminum strips onto the back plane to form the corrugations. The radiation beam pattern shows half-power beamwidths of 12{sup 0} and 14{sup 0} in the H and E planes respectively, and side lobe response below -40 dB at angles greater than 50{sup 0} from horn axis. The measured return loss is less than -20 dB (VSWR &lt; 1.22) between 1.7 and 2.3 GHz; insertion loss is less than 0.15 dB.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Bersanelli, M.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Limon, M.; Smoot, George F.; Tanaka, S. et al.

A 2-Megawatt load for testing high voltage dc power supplies

Description: A high power water-cooled resistive load, capable of dissipating 2 Megawatts at 95 kilovolts is being designed and built. The load utilizes wirewound resistor elements suspended inside insulating tubing contained within a pressure vessel which is supplied a continuous flow of deionized water for coolant. A sub-system of the load is composed of non-inductive resistor elements in an oil tank. Power tests conducted on various resistor types indicate that dissipation levels as high as 22 times the rated dissipation in air can be achieved when the resistors are placed in a turbulent water flow of at least 15 gallons per minute. Using this data, the load w.as designed using 100 resistor elements in a series arrangement A single-wall 316 stainless steel pressure vessel with flanged torispherical heads is built to contain the resistor assembly and deionized water. The resistors are suspended within G-11 tubing which span the cylindrical length of the vessel. These tubes are supported by G-10 baffles which also increase convection from the tubes by promoting turbulence within the surrounding water.
Date: June 1, 1993
Creator: Horan, D.; Kustom, R.; Ferguson, M. & Primdahl, K.

2 MW 110 GHz ECH heating system for DIII-D

Description: A 2 MW 110 GHz ECH system using Varian 0.5 MW gyrotrons is under construction for use on the DIII-D tokamak by late 1991. Most of the components are being design and fabricated at General Atomics, including the gyrotron tanks, superconducting magnets, and transmission line. These components are intended for operation with 10 second pulses and, in the future, with 1 MW gyrotrons. 6 refs., 5 figs.
Date: September 1990
Creator: Moeller, C.; Prater, R.; Callis, R.; Remsen, D.; Doane, J.; Cary, W. et al.

N = 2 string amplitudes

Description: In physics, solvable models have played very important roles. Understanding a simple model in detail teaches us a lot about more complicated models in generic situations. Five years ago, C. Vafa and I found that the closed N = 2 string theory, that is a string theory with the N = 2 local supersymmetry on the worldsheet, is classically equivalent to the self-dual Einstein gravity in four spacetime dimensions. Thus this string theory is solvable at the classical level. More recently, we have examined the N = 2 string partition function for spacial compactifications, and computed it to all order in the string perturbation expansion. The fact that such computation is possible at all suggests that the N = 2 string theory is solvable even quantum mechanically.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Ooguri, H.