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0.5 μm E/D AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure field effect transistor technology with DFET threshold adjust implant

Description: A doped-channel heterostructure field effect transistor (H-FET) technology has been developed with self-aligned refractory gate processing and using both enhancement- and depletion-mode transistors. D-HFET devices are obtained with a threshold voltage adjust implant into material designed for E-HFET operation. Both E- and D-HFETs utilize W/WSi bilayer gates, sidewall spacers, and rapid thermal annealing for controlling short channel effects. The 0.5 {mu}m E- HFETs (D-HFETs) have been demonstrated with transconductance of 425 mS/mm (265-310 mS/mm) and f{sub t} of 45-50 GHz. Ring oscillator gate delays of 19 ps with a power of 0.6 mW have been demonstrated using direct coupled FET logic. These results are comparable to previous doped-channel HFET devices and circuits fabricated by selective reactive ion etching rather than ion implantation for threshold voltage adjustment.
Date: April 1997
Creator: Baca, A. G.; Sherwin, M. E.; Zolper, J. C.; Shul, R. J.; Briggs, R. D.; Heise, J. A. et al.

D-0 End Calorimeter Warm Tube/TeV Dry Air Purge

Description: This Engineering Note studies the design of the Dry Air Purge that is going to flow through the Warm Tube of the End Calorimeter of the D-O Calorimeter. The Tev tubes through the E.C. can be thought of as a cluster of concentric tubes: The Tev tube, the warm (vacuum vessel) tube, 15 layers of superinsulation, the cold (argon vessel) tube, and the Inner Hadronic center support tube. The Dry Air Purge will involve flowing Dry Air through the annular region between the Warm Tube and the Tev Beam Pipe. This air flow is intended to prevent condensation from forming in this region which could turn to ice under cryogenic temperatures. Any ice formed in this gap, could cause serious problems when these tubes are moved. The Air will flow through a Nylon Tube Fitting -1/4-inch I.D. to 1/8-inch male pipe thread (Cole Palmer YB-06465-15) see Drawing MC-295221 (Appendix A). This fitting will be attached to the Nylon 2-inch Tube-Wiper and Seal Assembly which is clamped to the ends of the Warm Tube (Appendix A). This note includes drawings and calculations that explain the setup of the Dry Air Purge and give the required information on the pressure drops through the setup. The Equations and properties used in the calculations were obtained from the Applied Fluid Dynamics Handbook by Robert D. Blevins and Fluid Dynamics Second Edition by Frank M. White.
Date: August 14, 1991
Creator: Leibfritz, J. R.

0-G experiments with advanced ceramic fabric wick structures

Description: Both Air Force and NASA future spacecraft thermal management needs span the temperature range from cryogenic to liquid metals. Many of these needs are changing and not well defined and will remain so until goals, technology, and missions converge. Nevertheless, it is certain that high-temperature (> 800 K) and medium-temperature (about 450 K) radiator systems will have to be developed that offer significant improvements over current designs. This paper discusses experiments performed in the lower temperature regime as part of a comprehensive advanced ceramic fabric (ACF) heat pipe development program. These experiments encompassed wicking tests with various ceramic fabric samples, and heat transfer tests with a 1-m long prototype ACF water heat pipe. A prototype ceramic fabric/titanium water heat pipe has been constructed and tested; it transported up to 60 W of power at about 390 K. Startup and operation both with and against gravity examined. Wick testing was begun to aid in the design and construction of an improved prototype heat pipe, with a 38-{mu}m stainless steel linear covered by a biaxially-braided Nextel (trademark of the 3M Co., St. Paul, Minnesota) sleeve that is approximately 300-{mu}m thick. Wick testing took place in 1-g; limited testing in 0-g was initiated, and results to date suggest that in 0-g, wick performance improves over that in 1-g.
Date: July 1, 1991
Creator: Antoniak, Z.I.; Webb, B.J.; Bates, J.M.; Cooper, M.F. & Pauley, K.A.

D-0 North End Cap Calorimeter Cold Test Results

Description: The North endcap calorimeter vessel was recieved on July 1, 1990. A cooldown of the pressure vessel with liquid nitrogen was performed on July 10-11 to check the vessel's integrity. With the pressure vessel cold, the insulating vacuum was monitored for leaks. Through out the testing, the insulating vacuum remained good and the vessel passed the test. The cold test was carried out per the procedures of D-Zero engineering note 3740.220-EN-250. The test was very similar to the cold test performed on the Central Calorimeter in October of 1987. Reference D-Zero engineering notes 3740.210-EN-122, 3740.000-EN107, and 3740.210-EN-110 for information about the CC cold test. The insulating vacuum space was pumped on while equipment was being connected to the pressure vessel. Two hours after starting to pump with the blower the vacuum space pressure was at about 210 microns. Pumping on the vacuum space for the next 15 hours showed no progress and a leak detector was connected to the pumping line. A leak check showed a leak in a thermocouple feedthru on the vacuum space relief plate. After fixing the leak, the pressure dropped to 16 microns in less than one hour. A rate of rise test was performed starting at a pressure of 13 microns. The pressure rose to 39 microns within 8 minutes and then only rose to 43 microns in 2.5 hours (1.6 microns/hour). After all connections were made to the pressure vessel, a vacuum pump with an estimated effective pumping speed of about 70 scfm was valved on. The lowest pressure achieved after 2 days of pumping was 80 microns. Valving out the pump for 30 minutes resulted in a 5 micron per minute rate of rise. The rate of rise was considered acceptable since there were known leak paths through the bolts of the signal ...
Date: August 2, 1990
Creator: Michael, J.

D-0 South End Cap Calorimeter Cold Test Results

Description: The South endcap calorimeter vessel was moved into Lab A on Sept. 18, 1990. A cooldown of the pressure vessel with liquid nitrogen was performed on Sept. 26 to check the vessel's integrity. With the pressure vessel cold, the insulating vacuum was monitored for leaks. Through out the testing, the insulating vacuum remained good and the vessel passed the test. The cold test was carried out per the procedures of D-Zero engineering note 3740.220-EN-250. The test was very similar to the cold test performed on the Central Calorimeter in October of 1987. The test of the ECS was performed in the same manner using the same equipment as the ECN cold test. Reference D-Zero engineering notes 3740.210-EN-122, 3740.000-EN-I07, and 3740.210-EN-II0 for information about the CC cold test. Reference EN-260 for the results of the ECN cold test. The insulating vacuum space was pumped on while equipment was being connected to the pressure vessel. Two hours after starting to pump with the blower the vacuum space pressure was at about 40 microns. The pumping continued overnight (another 16 hours). In the morning the pressure was 11.5 microns. A rate of rise test was performed. With the pump valved off, the pressure rose to 14 microns within 5 minutes and then rose to 16 microns in 6 hours (0.33 microns/hour). After all connections were made to the pressure vessel, a vacuum pump with an estimated effective pumping speed of about 70 scfm was valved on. After 18 hours, the pressure vessel was down to 270 microns. An additional day of pumping took the pressure down to only 250 microns. A leak was then found and fixed around the seal of the rupture disc. The pump was put on line again. The pressure vessel with pump on line was 27 microns after 16.5 ...
Date: November 26, 1990
Creator: Rucinski, R.

1.2 MW klystron for Asymmetric Storage Ring B Factory

Description: A cw klystron operating at 476 MHz has been developed jointly by SLAC and Varian Associates. The unique set of characteristics of this tube were strongly guided by requirements of the fast feedback necessary to prevent oscillations of the storage ring beams caused by the detuned accelerating cavity. This requires a combination of bandwidth and short group delay within the klystron. The RF feedback stabilization scheme also requires amplitude modulation making it necessary to operate the klystron about 10% below saturation. Performance specifications and initial operating results are presented.
Date: March 1995
Creator: Fowkes, W. R.; Caryotakis, G. & Doyle, E.

A 1. 5--4 Kelvin detachable cold-sample transfer system: Application to inertially confined fusion with spin-polarized hydrogens fuels

Description: A compact cold-transfer apparatus for engaging and retrieving samples at liquid helium temperatures (1.5--4K), maintaining the samples at such temperatures for periods of hours, and subsequently inserting them in diverse apparatuses followed by disengagement, is described. The properties of several thermal radiation-insulating shrouds, necessary for very low sample temperatures, are presented. The immediate intended application is transportable target-shells containing highly spin-polarized deuterons in solid HD or D{sub 2} for inertially confined fusion (ICF) experiments. The system is also valuable for unpolarized high-density fusion fuels, as well as for other applications which are discussed. 9 refs., 6 figs.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: Alexander, N.; Barden, J.; Fan, Q. & Honig, A.

A 1.5 GeV compact light source with superconducting bending magnets

Description: This paper describes the design of a compact electron synchrotron light source for producing X-rays for medical imaging, protein crystallography, nano-machining and other uses up to 35 keV. The source will provide synchrotron light from six 6.9 tesla superconducting 60{degree} bending magnet stations. In addition the ring, contains conventional quadrupoles and sextupoles. The light source has a circumference of 26 meters, which permits it to be located in a variety of industrial and medical facilities.
Date: May 1995
Creator: Garren, A. A.; Cline, D. B.; Kolonko, J. J.; Green, M. A.; Johnson, D. E.; Leung, E. M. et al.

1.8.2.1.2 Site system engineering implementation Fiscal Year 1998 multi-year work plan

Description: Manage the Site Systems Engineering process to provide a traceable, integrated, requirements-driven, and technically defensible baseline., Through the Site Integration Group, Systems Engineering ensures integration of technical activities across all site projects. Systems Engineering`s primary interfaces are with the Project Direction Office and with the projects, as well as with the Planning organization.
Date: October 3, 1997
Creator: Ferguson, J. E.

1.8.3 Site system engineering FY 1997 program plan

Description: The FY 1997 Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP) technical baseline describes the functions to be accomplished and the technical standards that govern the work. The following information is provided in this FY 1997 MYWP: technical baseline, work breakdown structure, schedule baseline, cost baseline, and execution year.
Date: September 13, 1996
Creator: Grygiel, M. L.

1/12-scale physical modeling experiments in support of tank 241-SY- 101 hydrogen mitigation

Description: Hanford tank 241-SY-101 is a 75-ft-dia double-shell tank that contains approximately 1.1 M gal of radioactive fuel reprocessing waste. Core samples have shown that the tank contents are separated into two main layers, a article laden supernatant liquid at the top of the tank and a more dense slurry on the bottom. Two additional layers may be present, one being a potentially thick sludge lying beneath the slurry at the bottom of the tank and the other being the crust that has formed on the surface of the supernatant liquid. The supernatant is more commonly referred to as the convective layer and the slurry as the non-convective layer. Accumulation of gas (partly hydrogen) in the non-convective layer is suspected to be the key mechanism behind the gas burp phenomena, and several mitigation schemes are being developed to encourage a more uniform gas release rate (Benegas 1992). To support the full-scale hydraulic mitigation test, scaled experiments were performed to satisfy two objectives: 1. provide an experimental database for numerical- model validation; 2. establish operating parameter values required to mobilize the settled solids and maintain the solids in suspension.
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Fort, J. A.; Bamberger, J. A.; Bates, J. M.; Enderlin, C. W. & Elmore, M. R.

1-GeV Linac Upgrade Study at Fermilab

Description: A linac injector for a new proton source complex at Fermilab is assumed to have a kinetic energy of 1 GeV. This linac would be sized to accelerate 100 mA of H{sup -} beam in a 200 microsecond pulse at a 15 Hz repetition rate. This would be adequate to produce {approximately}10{sup 14} protons per pulse allowing for future improvements of the new proton source complex. An alternate proposal is to add 600 MeV of side coupled cavity linac at 805 MHz to the existing 400 MeV Linac. This addition may either be in a new location or use the present Booster tunnel. A discussion of these possibilities will be given.
Date: September 1998
Creator: Popovic, M.; Moretti, A.; Noble, R. & Schmidt, C. W.

A 1-kW power demonstration from the advanced free electron laser

Description: This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objective of this project was to engineer and procure an electron beamline compatible with the operation of a 1-kW free-electron laser (FEL). Another major task is the physics design of the electron beam line from the end of the wiggler to the electron beam dump. This task is especially difficult because electron beam is expected to have 20 kW of average power and to simultaneously have a 25% energy spread. The project goals were accomplished. The high-power electron design was completed. All of the hardware necessary for high-power operation was designed and procured.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Sheffield, R. L.; Conner, C. A. & Fortgang, C. M.

1/m<sub>c</sub> Terms in lambda<sup>+</sup><sub>c</sub> Semileptonic Decays

Description: We use the heavy quark effective theory to investigate the form factors that describe the semileptonic decays lambda<sup>+</sup><sub>c</sub> -> lambda e<sup>+</sup> nu, to order 1/m<sub>c</sub>. We find that a total of four form factors are needed to this order, in contrast with two form factors to leading order, and six form factors in the most general case. We point out some relationships that arise among the general form factors.
Date: February 1, 1992
Creator: Roberts, Winston

O(1/M{sup 3}) effects for heavy-light mesons in lattice NRQCD

Description: The masses of spin-singlet and spin-triplet S-wave mesons containing a single heavy quark are computed in the quenched approximation. The light quark action and gauge field action are both classically-improved and tadpole-improved, and the couplings to the heavy quark are organized by the 1/M expansion of tadpole-improved NRQCD. At each of two lattice spacings, near 0.22fm and 0.26fm, meson masses are obtained for heavy quarks spanning the region between charmed and bottom mesons. Results up to O(1/M), O(1/M{sup 2})and O(1/M{sup 3}) are displayed separately, so that the convergence of the heavy quark expansion can be discussed. Also, the effect of each term in the O(1/M{sup 3}) contribution is computed individually. For bottom mesons the 1/M-expansion appears to be satisfactory, but the situation for charmed mesons is less clear.
Date: March 1998
Creator: Lewis, Randy & Woloshyn, R. M.

1: Mass asymmetric fission barriers for {sup 98}Mo; 2: Synthesis and characterization of actinide-specific chelating agents

Description: Excitation functions have been measured for complex fragment emission from the compound nucleus {sup 98}Mo, produced by the reaction of {sup 86}Kr with {sup 12}C. Mass asymmetric fission barriers have been obtained by fitting the excitation functions with a transition state formalism. The extracted barriers are {approximately} 5.7 MeV higher, on average, than the calculations of the Rotating Finite Range Model (RFRM). These data clearly show an isospin dependence of the conditional barriers when compared with the extracted barriers from {sup 90}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. Eleven different liquid/liquid extractants were synthesized based upon the chelating moieties 3,2-HOPO and 3,4-HOPO; additionally, two liquid/liquid extractants based upon the 1,2-HOPO chelating moiety were obtained for extraction studies. The Pu(IV) extractions, quite surprisingly, yielded results that were very different from the Fe(III) extractions. The first trend remained the same: the 1,2-HOPOs were the best extractants, followed closely by the 3,2-HOPOs, followed by the 3,4-HOPOs; but in these Pu(IV) extractions the 3,4-HOPOs performed much better than in the Fe(III) extractions. 129 refs.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Veeck, A. C.

A-01 metals in stormwater runoff evaluation

Description: As a part of the A-01 investigation required by the NPDES permit, an investigation was performed to ascertain the concentrations of metals specifically copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in stormwater being discharged through the outfall. This information would indicate whether all water being discharged would have to be treated or if only a portion of the discharged stormwater would have to be treated. A study was designed to accomplish this. The first goal was to determine if the metal concentrations increased, decreased, or remained the same as flow increased during a rain event. The second goal was to determine if the concentrations in the storm water were due to dissolved. The third goal was to obtain background data to ascertain if effluent credits could be gained due to naturally occurring metals.Samples from this study were analyzed and indicate that the copper and lead values increase as the flow increases while the zinc values remain essentially the same regardless of the flow rate. Analyses of samples for total metals, dissolved metals, TSS, and metals in solids was complicated because in all cases metals contamination was found in the filters themselves. Some conclusions can be derived if this problem is taken into account when analyzing the data. Copper concentrations in the total and dissolved fractions as well as the TSS concentrations followed the hydrograph at this outfall but the copper in solids concentration appeared to peak in the first flush and decline to nondetectable rapidly over the course of the storm event. Lead was present in the total analysis but not present in the dissolved fraction or the solids fraction of the samples. The data for zinc was interesting in that the dissolved fractions were higher than the total fraction in three out of four samples. This is probably due ...
Date: November 6, 1997
Creator: Eldridge, L. L.

1 MeV electron irradiation of solid Xe nanoclusters in Al : an in-situ HRTEM study.

Description: Thin film samples of a simple embedded nanocluster system consisting of solid Xe precipitates in Al have been subjected to 1 MeV electron irradiation in a high-voltage electron microscope. High-resolution images have been recorded on videotape in order to monitor the changes to the system resulting from the passage of electrons through the film. Inspection of the video recordings (in some cases frame-by-frame) reveals that complex, rapid processes occur under the electron beam. These include, movement of small clusters, coalescence of neighboring clusters, shape changes, the apparent melting and resolidification of the Xe, and the creation and annealing of extended defects within the Xe lattice. A tentative interpretation of some of the observations is presented in terms of the electron-induced displacement processes at the surface of the clusters.
Date: December 5, 1997
Creator: Donnelly, S. E.; Furuya, K.; Song, M.; Birtcher, R. C. & Allen, C. W.

1. Mono((8)annulene)Uranium(4) half-sandwich complexes, 2. Novel syntheses of symmetrically substituted cyclooctatetetraenes

Description: A reproducible, high-yield synthesis of mono((8)annulene)uranium(4)dichloride (1) is reported, along with the X-ray crystal structural of the bis(pyridine) adduct. Metathesis reactions of the half-sandwich complex 1 with a variety of simple alkyl and alkoxy reagents failed to generate any isolable mono-ring complexes. Reactions of 1 with polydentate, delocalized anions did produce stable derivatives, including mono((8)annulene)uranium(4)bis(acetylacetonate) (4). An X-ray crystal structure of 4 is reported.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Boussie, T. R.

1 nA beam position monitoring system

Description: A system has been developed at Jefferson Lab for measuring transverse position of very low current beams delivered to the Experimental Hall B of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). At the heart of the system is a position sensitive cavity operating at 1497 MHz. The cavity utilizes a unique design which achieves a high sensitivity to beam position at a relatively low cavity Q. The cavity output RF signal is processed using a down-converter and a commercial lock-in amplifier operating at 100 kHz. The system interfaces with a VME based EPICS control system using the IEEE, 488 bus. The main features of the system are simple and robust design, and wide dynamic range capable of handling beam currents from 1 nA to 1000 nA with an expected resolution better than 100 {mu}m. This paper outlines the design of the system.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Ursic, R.; Flood, R. & Piller, C.

A 1- to 5-MW, RCS-based, short-pulse spallation neutron source

Description: Two accelerator configurations, the linac/compressor ring scheme and the linac/RCS scheme, are commonly used to provide the proton beam power for a short-pulse spallation neutron source. In one configuration, a full-power linac provides the beam power and a compressor ring shortens the pulse length from 1-ms down to 1 {micro}s. In the other, rapid cycling synchrotrons (RCSs) provide the beam power and also shorten the pulse length. A feasibility study of a staged approach to a 5-MW proton source utilizing RCS technology, allowing intermediate operation at 1 MW, was performed at ANL and is presented in this paper. This study is complementary to a study in progress at ORNL based on a linac and an accumulator ring. The 1-MW facility consists of a 400-MeV injector linac that delivers 0.5-mA time-averaged current, a synchrotron that accelerates the beam to 2 GeV at a 30-Hz rate, and two neutron-generating target stations. In the second phase, the 2-GeV beam is accelerated to 10 GeV by a larger RCS, increasing the facility beam power to 5 MW.
Date: June 1997
Creator: Cho, Y.; Chae, Y.-C. & Crosbie, E.

1-watt composite-slab Er:YAG laser. Revision 1

Description: A diode-side-pumped discrete-optic Er{sup 3+} :YAG laser employs pump-light coupling through a sapphire plate diffusion-bonded to the laser slab, removing heat directly at the pump face of the slab instead of requiring conduction through to its far side. This lowers the temperature in the gain region and gives reduced thermal lensing, which produces exceptional beam quality (M{sup 2} {approx} 1.3) at output powers {approx} 0.3 Watt. Powers above 1 Watt have been demonstrated with peak slope efficiencies {approx}20%. The novel architecture is also applicable to other side-pumped lasers.
Date: February 13, 1997
Creator: Page, R. H.; Bartels, R. A.; Beach, R. J.; Sutton, S. B.; Furu, L. H. & LaSala, J. E.

2-1/2-D electromagnetic modeling of nodular defects in high-power multilayer optical coatings

Description: Advances in the design and production of high damage threshold optical coatings for use in mirrors and polarizers have been driven by the design requirements of high-power laser systems such as the proposed 1.8-MJ National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the prototype 12- kJ Beamlet laser system. The present design of the NIF will include 192 polarizers and more than 1100 mirrors. Currently, the material system of choice for high-power multilayer optical coatings with high damage threshold applications near 1.06 {mu}m are e-beam deposited HfO{sub 2}/Si0{sub 2} coatings. However, the optical performance and laser damage thresholds of these coatings are limited by micron-scale defects and insufficient control over layer thickness. In this report, we will discuss the results of our 2-1/2-D finite-element time- domain (FDTD) EM modeling effort for rotationally-symmetric nodular defects in multilayer dielectric HR coatings. We have added a new diagnostic to the 2-1/2-D FDTD EM code, AMOS, that enables us to calculate the peak steady-state electric fields throughout a 2-D planar region containing a 2-D r-z cross-section of the axisymmetric nodular defect and surrounding multilayer dielectric stack. We have also generated a series of design curves to identify the range of loss tangents for Si0{sub 2} and HfO{sub 2} consistent with the experimentally determined power loss of the HR coatings. In addition, we have developed several methods to provide coupling between the EM results and the thermal-mechanical simulation effort.
Date: July 1996
Creator: Molau, N. E.; Brand, H. R.; Kozlowski, M. R. & Shang, C. C.