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3-D Seismic Imaging of Complex Geologies

Description: We present three codes for the Intel Paragon that address the problem of three-dimensional seismic imaging of complex geologies. The first code models acoustic wave propagation and can be used to generate data sets to calibrate and validate seismic imaging codes. This code reported the fastest timings for acoustic wave propagation codes at a recent SEG (Society of Exploration Geophysicists) meeting. The second code implements a Kirchhoff method for pre-stack depth migration. Development of this code is almost complete, and preliminary results are presented. The third code implements a wave equation approach to seismic migration and is a Paragon implementation of a code from the ARCO Seismic Benchmark Suite.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Womble, David E.; Dosanjh, Sudip S.; VanDyke, John P.; Oldfield, Ron A. & Greenberg, David S.

3-D Silicon Photonic Lattices- Cornerstone of an Emerging Photonics Revolution

Description: Three-dimensional photonic lattices are engineered materials which are the photonic analogues of semiconductors. These structures were first proposed and demonstrated in the mid-to-late 1980's. However, due to fabrication difficulties, lattices active in the infrared are only just emerging. Wide ranges of structures and fabrication approaches have been investigated. The most promising approach for many potential applications is a diamond-like structure fabricated using silicon microprocessing techniques. This approach has enabled the fabrication of 3-D silicon photonic lattices active in the infrared. The structures display band gaps centered from 12{micro} down to 1.55{micro}.
Date: July 8, 1999
Creator: Fleming, J.G. & Lin, Shawn-Yu

3-D Spectral Induced Polarization (IP) Imaging: Non-Invasive Characterization Of Contaminant Plumes

Description: The overall objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth's subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. Three specific objectives towards this end are 1. 2. 3. Understanding IP at the laboratory level through measurements of complex resistivity as a function of frequency in rock and soil samples with varying pore geometries, pore fluid conductivities and saturations, and contaminant chemistries and concentrations. Developing effective data acquisition techniques for measuring the critical IP responses (time domain or frequency domain) in the field. Developing modeling and inversion algorithms that permit the interpretation of field IP data in terms of subsurface geology and contaminant plume properties.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Morgan, Dale F.; Lesmes, David P.; Rodi, William; Shi, Weiqun; Frye, Kevin, M. & Sturrock, John

3-D Spectral IP Imaging: Non-Invasive Characterization of Contaminant Plumes

Description: The overall objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth's subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. Three specific objectives towards this end are: (1) Understanding IP at the laboratory level through measurements of complex resistivity as a function of frequency in rock and soil samples with varying pore geometries, pore fluid conductivities and saturations, and contaminant chemistries and concentrations. (2) Developing effective data acquisition techniques for measuring the critical IP responses (time domain or frequency domain) in the field. (3) Developing modeling and inversion algorithms that permit the interpretation of field IP data in terms of subsurface geology and contaminant plume properties.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Morgan, F. Dale; Rodi, William & Lesmes, David

3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. 1998 annual progress report

Description: 'The overall objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth''s subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. Three specific objectives towards this end are: (1) understanding IP at the laboratory level through measurements of complex resistivity as a function of frequency in rock and soil samples with varying pore geometries, pore fluid conductivities and saturations, and contaminant chemistries and concentrations; (2) developing effective data acquisition techniques for measuring the critical IP responses (time domain or frequency domain) in the field; (3) developing modeling and inversion algorithms that permit the interpretation of field IP data in terms of subsurface geology and contaminant plume properties. The authors laboratory experiments to date are described in Appendices A and B, which consist of two papers submitted to the annual SAGEEP conference (Frye et al., 1998; Sturrock et al., 1998). The experiments involved measurements of complex resistivity vs. frequency on a suite of brine saturated sandstone samples. In one set of experiments, the fluid chemistry (pH, ionic strength, and cation type) was varied. In a second set of experiments, the microgeometry of the rock matrix was varied. The experiments showed that spectral IP responses are sensitive to subtle variations in both the solution chemistry and rock microgeometry. The results demonstrate that spectral IP responses have the potential of being sensitive indicators of in-situ chemistry and microgeometry, the latter of which may be related to the hydraulic properties. Data Acquisition The authors have been looking in some detail at the effects of electromagnetic coupling and how to practically deal with it. In this area, the results to date are summarized in Vandiver (1998). The progress in the development of modeling and inversion algorithms for IP is described in Appendix C, a paper submitted to the ...
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Morgan, F. D.; Rodi, W. & Lesmes, D.

3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

Description: 'The objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth''s subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. The first-year accomplishments are (1) laboratory experiments on fluid-saturated sandstones quantifying the dependence of spectral IP responses on solution chemistry and rock micro-geometry; (2) library research on the current understanding of electromagnetic coupling effects on IP data acquired in the field: and (3) development of prototype forward modeling and inversion algorithms for interpreting IP data in terms of 3-D models of complex resistivity.'
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Frye, K.M.; Lesmes, D.P.; Morgan, F.D.; Rodi, W.; Shi, W. & Sturrock, J.

3-D subsurface modeling within the framework of an environmental restoration information system: Prototype results using earthvision

Description: As a result of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE-ORR) placement on the EPA Superfund National Priorities List in December of 1989, all remedial activities, including characterization, remedial alternatives selection, and implementation of remedial measures, must meet the combined requirements of RCRA, CERCLA, and NEPA. The Environmental Restoration Program, therefore, was established with the mission of eliminating or reducing to prescribed safe levels the risks to the environment or to human health and safety posed by inactive and surplus DOE-ORR managed sites and facilities that have been contaminated by radioactive and surplus DOE-ORR managed sites and facilities that have been contaminated by radioactive, hazardous, or mixed wastes. In accordance with an established Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA), waste sites and facilities across the DOE-ORR have been inventoried, prioritized, and are being systematically investigated and remediated under the direction of Environmental Restoration. EarthVision, a product of Dynamic Graphics, Inc., that provides three-dimensional (3-D) modeling and visualization, was exercised within the framework of an environmental restoration (ER) decision support system. The goal of the prototype was to investigate framework integration issues including compatibility and value to decision making. This paper describes the ER program, study site, and information system framework; selected EarthVision results are shown and discussed. EarthVision proved effective in integrating complex data from disparate sources and in providing 3-D visualizations of the spatial relationships of the data, including contaminant plumes. Work is under way to expand the analysis to the full site, covering about 1600 acres, and to include data from new sources, particularly remote-sensing studies.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Goeltz, R. T. & Zondlo, T. F.

3-D Target Location from Stereoscopic SAR Images

Description: SAR range-Doppler images are inherently 2-dimensional. Targets with a height offset lay over onto offset range and azimuth locations. Just which image locations are laid upon depends on the imaging geometry, including depression angle, squint angle, and target bearing. This is the well known layover phenomenon. Images formed with different aperture geometries will exhibit different layover characteristics. These differences can be exploited to ascertain target height information, in a stereoscopic manner. Depending on the imaging geometries, height accuracy can be on the order of horizontal position accuracies, thereby rivaling the best IFSAR capabilities in fine resolution SAR images. All that is required for this to work are two distinct passes with suitably different geometries from any plain old SAR.
Date: October 1, 1999
Creator: Doerry, Armin W.

3-D TECATE/BREW: Thermal, stress, and birefringent ray-tracing codes for solid-state laser design

Description: This report describes the physics, code formulations, and numerics that are used in the TECATE (totally Eulerian code for anisotropic thermo-elasticity) and BREW (birefringent ray-tracing of electromagnetic waves) codes for laser design. These codes resolve thermal, stress, and birefringent optical effects in 3-D stationary solid-state systems. This suite of three constituent codes is a package referred to as LASRPAK.
Date: July 20, 1994
Creator: Gelinas, R. J.; Doss, S. K. & Nelson, R. G.

A 3-D time-dependent unstructured tetrahedral-mesh SP{sub N} method

Description: We have developed a 3-D time-dependent multigroup SP{sub n} method for unstructured tetrahedral meshes. The SP{sub n} equations are expressed in a canonical form which allows them to be solved using standard diffusion solution techniques in conjunction with source iteration, diffusion-synthetic acceleration, and fission-source acceleration. A computational comparison of our SP{sub n} method with an even-parity S{sub n} method is given.
Date: October 1, 1994
Creator: Morel, J. E.; McGhee, J. M. & Larsen, E. W.

3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 1, 5 April--5 July 1991

Description: The lack of a mathematical description of the interactions of fluid turbulence with other physics-chemical processes is a major obstacle in modeling many industrial program. Turbulent two-phase flow is a phenomenon that is of significant practical importance to coal combustion as well as other disciplines. The interactions of fluid turbulence with the particulate phase has yet to be accurately and efficiently modeled for these industrial applications. On 15 May 1991 work was initiated to cover four major tasks toward the development of a computational submodel for turbulent particle dispersion that would be applicable to coal combustion simulations. Those four tasks are: 1. A critical evaluation of the 2-D Lagrangian particle dispersion submodel, 2. Development of a 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 3. Evaluation of the 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 4.Exploration of extensions of the Lagrangian dispersion theory to other applications including chemistry-turbulence interactions.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Smith, P. J.

3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 2, 15 July--15 October 1991

Description: The lack of a mathematical description of the interactions of fluid turbulence with other physics-chemical processes is a major obstacle in modeling many industrial program. Turbulent two-phase flow is a phenomenon that is of significant practical importance to coal combustion as well as other disciplines. The interactions of fluid turbulence with the particulate phase has yet to be accurately and efficiently modeled for these industrial applications. On 15 May 1991 work was initiated to cover four major tasks toward the development of a computational submodel for turbulent particle dispersion that would be applicable to coal combustion simulations. Those four tasks are: 1. A critical evaluation of the 2-D Lagrangian particle dispersion submodel, 2. Development of a 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 3. Evaluation of the 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 4. Exploration of extensions of the Lagrangian dispersion theory to other applications including chemistry-turbulence interactions.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Smith, P. J.

3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 3, October 15, 1991--January 15, 1992

Description: Many practical combustion processes which use solid particles, liquid droplets, or slurries as fuels introduce these fuels into turbulent environments. Examples include spray combustion, pulverized coal and coal slurry combustion, fluidized beds, sorbent injection, and hazardous waste incineration. The interactions of the condensed phases with turbulent environments have not been well described. Such a description is complicated by the difficulty of describing turbulence in general, even in the absence of particles or droplets. But the complications in describing the dispersion and reaction of the condensed phases in turbulent environments do not stem entirely or even primarily from the uncertainties in the description of the turbulence. Theoretical descriptions of the turbulent dispersion of particles and droplets are not well established, even when the characteristics of the turbulence are known. Several new theoretical descriptions of the turbulent dispersion of particles an droplets have proposed over the past five years. It is the purpose of this project to explore the potential of two of these theories for coupling with the other aspects of three-dimensional, reacting, turbulent, particle-laden systems to proved computational simulations that could be useful for addressing industrial problems.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Smith, P. J.

3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 4, January 15, 1992--April 15, 1992

Description: Many practical combustion processes which use solid particles, liquid droplets, or slurries as fuels introduce these fuels into turbulent environments. Examples include spray combustion, pulverized coal and coal slurry combustion, fluidized beds, sorbent injection, and hazardous waste incineration. The interactions of the condensed phases with turbulent environments have not been well described. Such a description is complicated by the difficulty of describing turbulence in general, even in the absence of particles or droplets. But the complications in describing the dispersion and reaction of the condensed phases in turbulent environments do not stem entirely or even primarily from the uncertainties in the description of the turbulence. Theoretical descriptions of the turbulent dispersion of particles and droplets are not well established, even when the characteristics of the turbulence are known. It is the purpose of this project to develop two different particle dispersion submodels (one each for dilute and dense phases), and couple them with existing fluid-dynamic heat transfer and reaction chemistry models to provide computational simulations capable of addressing industrial problems.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Smith, P. J.

3-D vertical seismic profiling at LLNL Site 300

Description: The initial goal of the 3-D Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) work at LLNL was to characterize seismic wave velocities and frequencies below the vadose zone to design the acquisition geometry for a 3-D shallow surface seismic reflection survey. VSPs are also used routinely to provide a link between surface seismic data and well logs. However, a test 2-D seismic line recorded at LLNL in the Spring of 1994 indicated that obtaining high quality reflection images below the vadose zone, yet shallower that 50 m, would require an expensive, very finely sampled survey ({lt} 1 m receiver spacing). Extensive image processing of the LLNL 2-D test line indicated that the only reliable reflection was from the top of the water table. Surprisingly, these results were very different than recent 3-D seismic work recorded at other sites, where high quality, high frequency surface (up to 300 Hz) reflection images were obtained as shallow as 20m. We believe that the differences are primarily due to the comparatively deep vadose zone at LLNL (15 to 30m) as compared to 0-5m at other sites. The thick vadose zone attenuates the reflection signals, particularly at the high frequencies (above 100 @). In addition, the vadose zone at LLNL creates a seismogram in which surface-propagating noise overlaps with the reflection signals for reflections above 50 m. By contrast, when the vadose zone is not thick, high frequencies can propagate and noise will not overlap with reflections as severely. Based on the results from the 2-D seismic line and the encouraging results from a VSP run concurrent with the 2-D seismic experiment, we modified the objectives of the research and expanded the scope of the VSP imaging at LLNL. We conducted two 3-D multi-offset VSP experiments at LLNL in the Summer and Fall of 1994. These VSP experiments ...
Date: January 29, 1997
Creator: Bainer, R.; Rector, J. & Milligan, P.

3-D woven, mullite matrix, composite filter

Description: Westinghouse, with Techniweave as a major subcontractor, is conducting a three-phase program aimed at providing advanced candle filters for a 1996 pilot scale demonstration in one of the two hot gas filter systems at Southern Company Service`s Wilsonville PSD Facility. The Base Program (Phases I and II) objective is to develop and demonstrate the suitability of the Westinghouse/Techniweave next generation composite candle filter for use in Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and/or Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. The Optional Task (Phase M, Task 5) objective is to fabricate, inspect and ship to Wilsonville Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful commercializaion of advanced coal-based power-generation systems such as Pressurized Fluidized-bed Combustion (PFBC), including second-generation PFBC, and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC). Current generation monolithic ceramic filters are subject to catastrophic failure because they have very low resistance to crack propagation. To overcome this problem, a damage-tolerant ceramic filter element is needed.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Lane, J.E.; Painter, C.J. & Radford, K.C. LeCostaouec, J.F.

3 Dimensional radiation transport in dispersive media

Description: In plasmas the collective motion of free electrons affects the propagation of radiation by bending the light ray trajectory. The closer the light wave frequency is to the electron plasma frequency in value, the more pronounced the effect. We will present the results of radiation transport calculations in 3 spatial dimensions in the refractive plasma environment and compare the calculation to one done where the ray bending has been neglected (straight line ray paths). We also present the numerical method used for the refractive transport. 4 refs., 5 figs.
Date: November 1, 1990
Creator: Mayle, R.W.

A 3-dimensional ray-trace model for predicting the performance of flashlamp-pumped laser amplifiers

Description: We have developed a fully three-dimensional model for the performance of flashlamp pumped laser amplifiers. The model uses a reverse ray-trace technique to calculate the pumping of the laser glass by the flashlamp radiation. We have discovered several different methods by which we can speed up the calculation of the gain profile in a amplifier. The model predicts the energy-storage performance of the Beamlet amplifiers to better than 5%. This model will be used in the optimization of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) amplifier design.
Date: February 13, 1997
Creator: Jancaitis, K.S.; Haney, S.W.; Munro, D.H.; Le Touze, G. & Cabourdin, O.

3-dimensional wells and tunnels for finite element grids

Description: Modeling fluid, vapor, and air injection and extraction from wells poses a number of problems. The length scale of well bores is centimeters, the region of high pressure gradient may be tens of meters and the reservoir may be tens of kilometers. Furthermore, accurate representation of the path of a deviated well can be difficult. Incorporating the physics of injection and extraction can be made easier and more accurate with automated grid generation tools that incorporate wells as part of a background mesh that represents the reservoir. GEOMESH is a modeling tool developed for automating finite element grid generation. This tool maintains the geometric integrity of the geologic framework and produces optimal (Delaunay) tetrahedral grids. GEOMESH creates a 3D well as hexagonal segments formed along the path of the well. This well structure is tetrahedralized into a Delaunay mesh and then embedded into a background mesh. The well structure can be radially or vertically refined and each well layer is assigned a material property or can take on the material properties of the surrounding stratigraphy. The resulting embedded well can then be used by unstructured finite element models for gas and fluid flow in the vicinity of wells or tunnels. This 3D well representation allows the study of the free- surface of the well and surrounding stratigraphy. It reduces possible grid orientation effects, and allows better correlation between well sample data and the geologic model. The well grids also allow improved visualization for well and tunnel model analysis. 3D observation of the grids helps qualitative interpretation and can reveal features not apparent in fewer dimensions.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Cherry, T.A.; Gable, C.W. & Trease, H.

3 MW, 110 GHz ECH system for the DIII-D tokamak

Description: To support the Advanced Tokamak (AT) operating regimes in the DIII-D tokamak, methods need to be developed to control the current and pressure profiles across the plasma discharge. In particular, AT plasmas require substantial off-axis current in contrast to normal tokamak discharges where the current peaks on-axis. An effort is under way to use Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) as a method of sustaining the off-axis current in AT plasmas. The first step in this campaign is the installation of three megawatts of electron cyclotron heating power. This involves the installation of three rf systems operating at 110 GHz, the second harmonic resonance frequency on DIII-D, with each system generating nominally 1 MW. The three systems will use one GYCOM (Russian) gyrotron and two CPI (formerly Varian) gyrotrons, all with windowless evacuated corrugated low loss transmission lines. The first two of three 1 MW ECH systems is operating routinely at DIII-D with injected power at 110 GHz of approximately 1.5 MW with good power accountability. Transport experiments using modulated ECH have been performed confirming the power deposition location. On-axis and off-axis current drive experiments have been successfully performed with on-axis ECCD currents of 170 kA being observed.
Date: July 1998
Creator: Callis, R. W.; Lohr, J.; Ponce, D.; Harris, T. E.; O`Neill, R. C.; Remsen, D.B. et al.

3(omega) damage threshold evaluation of final optics components using Beamlet mule and off-line testing

Description: A statistics-based model is being developed to predict the laser-damage-limited lifetime of UV optical components on the NIF laser. In order to provide data for the model, laser damage experiments were performed on the Beamlet laser system at LLNL. An early prototype NIF focus lens was exposed to twenty 35 1 nm pulses at an average fluence of 5 J/cm{sup 2}, 3ns. Using a high resolution optic inspection system a total of 353 damage sites was detected within the 1160 cm{sup 2} beam aperture. Through inspections of the lens before, after and, in some cases, during the campaign, pulse to pulse damage growth rates were measured for damage initiating both on the surface and at bulk inclusions. Growth rates as high as 79 {micro}m/pulse (surface diameter) were observed for damage initiating at pre-existing scratches in the surface. For most damage sites on the optic, both surface and bulk, the damage growth rate was approximately l0{micro}m/pulse. The lens was also used in Beamlet for a subsequent 1053 {micro}m/526 {micro}m campaign. The 352 {micro}m-initiated damage continued to grow during that campaign although at generally lower growth rate.
Date: July 27, 1998
Creator: Kozlowski, M. F.; Maricle, S.; Mouser, R.; Schwartz, S.; Wegner, P. & Weiland, T.

4.5 Meter high level waste canister study

Description: The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Storage and Disposal Project has established the Immobilized High-Level Waste (IBLW) Storage Sub-Project to provide the capability to store Phase I and II BLW products generated by private vendors. A design/construction project, Project W-464, was established under the Sub-Project to provide the Phase I capability. Project W-464 will retrofit the Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB) to accommodate the Phase I I-ILW products. Project W-464 conceptual design is currently being performed to interim store 3.0 m-long BLW stainless steel canisters with a 0.61 in diameter, DOE is considering using a 4.5 in canister of the same diameter to reduce permanent disposal costs. This study was performed to assess the impact of replacing the 3.0 in canister with the 4.5 in canister. The summary cost and schedule impacts are described.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

The 4-8 GHz Stochastic Cooling Upgrade for the Fermilab Debuncher

Description: During the Fermilab Collider Run II, the Main Injector is expected to provided a three-fold increase in flux of the proton beam sent to the antiproton production target as compared to the previous Collider Run Ib. This increase in antiproton production rate to 20 x 10{sup 10} antiprotons/hour will be handled by upgrading the stochastic cooling systems in both the Debuncher and Accumulator rings of the Fermilab Antiproton Source. In the Debuncher ring, the upgrade calls for increasing the stochastic cooling system bandwidth from 2-4 to 4-8 GHz. The effective front-end noise temperature of the cooling systems will also be lowered from 125K to 35K. This paper will discuss some details of the system design of the new 4-8 GHz cooling systems in the Debuncher Ring.
Date: January 1, 1999
Creator: McGinnis, D.