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“Civilizations without Boats”: Stories

Description: This collection consists of a critical preface and nine short stories. Extrapolating from the work and legacy of Michel Foucault, the preface theorizes a genre of “heterotopian fiction” as constitutive of a fundamentally ethical approach to narrative creativity, distinguishing its functional and methodological characteristics from works that privilege aesthetic, thematic, or technical artistry. The stories explore spaces of madness, alterity, incomprehensibility, and liminal experience. Collection includes the stories “Mexico,” “Civilizations without Boats,” The Widow’s Mother,” “Guys Like Us,” “Everything You’d Hoped It Would Be,” “A Concerned Friend,” “Crisis Hotline,” “Coast to Coast,” and “The Ghosts of Rich Men.”
Date: August 2011
Creator: Hubbs, Travis

Claremont Connections

Description: Claremont Connections is a collection of fictional short stories about the relationships between the generations of women in one family and their friends.
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Date: August 2004
Creator: Elerson, Crystal L.

Classical Mythology in the Secular Poetry of John Donne

Description: It is the purpose of this thesis to examine the classical allusion in Donne's secular poetry to show that the body of such allusion is more extensive than is generally conceded. More important, this study will evaluate rather than merely catalogue the allusions in order to show ho Donne employs such allusion and in what way his poetic practice as to the employment of classical allusion is different from the practice of his contemporaries. It will be demonstrated that, with very few exceptions, Donne uses the standard myth or allusion as a foundation or departure point from which he then goes on to synthesize the myth and turn it into poetic material that is of special significance to his theme.
Date: January 1967
Creator: Walker, Brena Bain

Cleopatra: A Comparative Critique

Description: Shakespeare's Cleopatra is a character of magnificent aspect, a puzzling paradox of magnetic intensity, an intensified diversity unmatched by any other Cleopatra in literary history. Although she was not his invention, Shakespeare made of her a living woman, believable in spite of her incredulous behavior.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Orcutt, Helen Jewell Smith

Clergymen in the Life of Samuel L. Clemens

Description: This thesis intends to point out the religious thoughts that Clemens encountered. It will present the various religious groups with which he dealt the most and the clergymen with whom he associated both casually and intimately. It will also attempt to indicate at least one reason why he never found in religion the peace which he sought.
Date: August 1970
Creator: Coffey, Sandra Jean Williams

Clocks and Mirrors

Description: The essays featured in this collection highlight the gaps, as well as parallels, between mental illness and the human condition. In "Appearances," the narrator struggles with her own visual identity especially after reflecting on her Mom's own lengthy history with the mirror. In "Migrations," the lyrical voice of the narrator carries the reader through the typical day of a clinically depressed female character. Lastly, "Attempting the Fall," addresses the issues society has with mental illness by following the narrator from her suicide attempt to the mental ward.
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Date: December 2016
Creator: Thies, Jaclyn Michele

Clutch

Description: Clutch is the title of the creative portion of my thesis as well as the name of my theory 'clutch' which I outline in the preface section. The purpose of the clutch theory is to recognize modes of inspiration in the body, heart and mind so that the poet can consciously move beyond passive receptivity to engage inspiration more fully. Mechanically, to "clutch" does not mean to create inspiration, but it is the opportunistic, spirited encouragement of these moments of inspiration and, more importantly, the direction of the artist's own response in moving from inspiration to creation. The clutch process unfolds through three centers: body, heart and mind, where we initially encounter inspiration. And, through a discussion of three notable poets' work, Henri Cole, Li-Young Lee and T.S. Eliot, the relationship between a completed work and clutch as a process further explains the boundaries of each mode.
Date: August 2009
Creator: Bauge, Jessica M.

Coleridge and Kant: Significant Parallels and Contrasts in Ethical and Religious Ideas

Description: One notes that Kant's philosophy became a part of Coleridge's thinking, and his devotion to its principle intensified through the years. Although Kant influenced Coleridge's aesthetics greatly, significant parallels between Kant's moral and ethical principles and Coleridge's religious doctrines are evidence of distinct influence. Particularly interesting are the views these two men had on the being and nature of God; on sin, salvation, and redemption; and on the various aspects of religion and faith.
Date: August 1969
Creator: Carr, Barbara C.

The Comic Element in the Novels of Thomas Wolfe

Description: As to form, Wolfe's novels are deliberately loose, because that is important to his purpose. Conceiving America as an open society of potentiality, he could do no less than remain open himself. To do otherwise would have meant impotence if not sterility. In this thesis, I shall attempt to show that the episodes, divergences, and observations all illustrate and amplify this spiritual growth.
Date: 1957
Creator: Hanig, David Daniel

A Comparison of Christopher Marlowe's Edward II and William Shakespeare's Richard II

Description: This study purports to examine several areas of similarity between the chronicle history plays by Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare. Edward II and Richard II are alike in many ways, most strikingly in the similarity of the stories themselves. But this is a superficial likeness, for there are many other likenesses--in purpose, in artistry, in language--which demonstrate more clearly than the parallel events of history the remarkable degree to which these plays resemble each other.
Date: January 1960
Creator: Ford, Howard Lee

A Comparison of Morris' News from Nowhere and Life in the Twin Oaks Community

Description: It is the purpose of this paper to explore how Morris' novel relates to life in Twin Oaks, primarily as depicted in two books: Living the Dream (1983) by Ingrid Komar, a long-term visitor to the commune and Kinkade's Is It Utopia Yet? (1996). This comparison will demonstrate that the experiences of contemporary intentional communities such as Twin Oaks provide a meaningful context for reading News from Nowhere because of the similarities in goals and philosophy. It will further demonstrate that though Twin Oaks was originally inspired by a utopian novel much more in the tradition of Bellamy's work than Morris', the community's subsequent evolution has brought it much closer in philosophy to News from Nowhere than Looking Backward.
Date: December 2007
Creator: Garner, Royce Clifton

A Composition Program for Accelerated High School Students

Description: Since so many aids are available to help the teacher in the actual process of writing, this study will concentrate on the various ways in which other benefits, such as heightened awareness, educated imagination, increased self-esteem, and improved critical judgment, can be integrated into a composition class for accelerated students.
Date: August 1969
Creator: Reynolds, Grover A.

The Concept of Dignity in the Early Science Fiction Novels of Kurt Vonnegut.

Description: Kurt Vonnegut's early science fiction novels depict societies and characters that, as in the real world, have become callous and downtrodden. These works use supercomputers, aliens, and space travel, often in a comical manner, to demonstrate that the future, unless people change their concepts of humanity, will not be the paradise of advanced technology and human harmony that some may expect. In fact, Vonnegut suggests that the human condition may gradually worsen if people continue to look further and further into the universe for happiness and purpose. To Vonnegut, the key to happiness is dignity, and this key is to be found within ourselves, not without.
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Date: May 2003
Creator: Dye, Scott Allen

The Concept of the Ennobling Power of Love in Shakespeare's Love Tragedies

Description: This study proposes to demonstrate that the Platonic doctrine of the ennobling power of love is of paramount importance in a number of Shakespeare's plays. This study has been limited to the three love tragedies because in them the ennobling power of love is a major theme, affecting both the characters and the plot structure. The plays to be studied are Romeo and Juliet, Troilus and Cressida, and Antony and Cleopatra.
Date: January 1968
Creator: Fort, Barbara Jean

Confession and the Via Dolorosa in Crime and Punishment

Description: This study provides a detailed analysis of the confession motif in Dostoevsky' s Crime and Punishment. It discusses Dostoevsky's use of the sacramental concept of confession, in which the estranged person is reunited with the human community through contrite confession. Throughout the novel, Raskolnikov wavers between desiring estrangement and seeking union. These two poles are shown in his encounters with Sonya and Porfiry (who represent union) and Luzhin and Svidrigaylov (who represent estrangement). Sonya and Porfiry tell Raskolnikov to confess and accept responsibility for his life; Luzhin and Svidrigaylov show him how to continue passing responsibility to others. This study also demonstrates that the epilogue is not merely a tag, as some Dostoevsky critics have argued. Rather, Raskolnikov' s redemption is the only thematically and psychologically valid conclusion.
Date: August 1984
Creator: Collins, Cynthia R.

The Conflict between Individualism and Socialism in the Life and Novels of Jack London

Description: The fact that Jack London's novels seem to fall into two classes--those which he wrote for money and those which he wrote to deliver a social message--has led to this study of his life and novels. It is the aim of this thesis to show that his life was one of conflict between individualism and socialism and that this conflict is reflected to a varying degree in his novels.
Date: 1948
Creator: Dozier, Mary Dean