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Effects of Web-based Instruction in High School Chemistry.

Description: The intent of this study is to identify correlations that might exist between Web-based instruction and higher assessment scores in secondary education. The study framework was held within the confines of a public high school chemistry classroom. Within this population there were students identified as gifted and talented (GT) as well as those without this designation. These two classifications were examined for statistically higher assessment scores using a two-tailed t-test. Results indicated that females outperformed males on pre- and post- instructional unit tests. All subgroups improved their logical-thinking skills and exhibited positive attitudes towards Web-based instruction. In general, Web-based instruction proved beneficial to improving classroom performance of all GT and non-GT groups as compared to traditional classroom instruction.
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Date: May 2003
Creator: Stratton, Eric W.

Electrochemical Deposition of Zinc-Nickel Alloys in Alkaline Solution for Increased Corrosion Resistance.

Description: The optimal conditions for deposition of zinc-nickel alloys onto stainless steel discs in alkaline solutions have been examined. In the past cadmium has been used because it shows good corrosion protection, but other methods are being examined due to the high toxicity and environmental threats posed by its use. Zinc has been found to provide good corrosion resistance, but the corrosion resistance is greatly increased when alloyed with nickel. The concentration of nickel in the deposit has long been a debated issue, but for basic solutions a nickel concentration of 8-15% appears optimal. However, deposition of zinc-nickel alloys from acidic solutions has average nickel concentrations of 12-15%. Alkaline conditions give a more uniform deposition layer, or better metal distribution, thereby a better corrosion resistance. Although TEA (triethanolamine) is most commonly used to complex the metals in solution, in this work I examined TEA along with other complexing agents. Although alkaline solutions have been examined, most research has been done in pH ≥ 12 solutions. However, there has been some work performed in the pH 9.3-9.5 range. This work examines different ligands in a pH 9.3-9.4 range. Direct potential plating and pulse potential plating methods are examined for optimal platings. The deposits were examined and characterized by XRD.
Date: December 2009
Creator: Conrad, Heidi A.

Electrochemical Study of Under-Potential Deposition Processes on Transition Metal Surfaces

Description: Copper under-potential deposition (UPD) on iridium was studied due to important implications it presents to the semiconductor industry. Copper UPD allows controlled superfilling on sub-micrometer trenches; iridium has characteristics to prevent copper interconnect penetration into the surrounding dielectric. Copper UPD is not favored on iridium oxides but data shows copper over-potential deposition when lower oxidation state Ir oxide is formed. Effect of anions in solution on silver UPD at platinum (Pt) electrodes was studied with the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance. Silver UPD forms about one monolayer in the three different electrolytes employed. When phosphoric acid is used, silver oxide growth is identified due to presence of low coverage hydrous oxide species at potentials prior to the monolayer oxide region oxide region.
Date: August 2006
Creator: Flores Araujo, Sarah Cecilia

Electrochemical synthesis of CeO2 and CeO2/montmorillonite nanocomposites.

Description: Nanocrystalline cerium oxide thin films on metal and semiconductor substrates have been fabricated with a novel electrodeposition approach - anodic oxidation. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that as-produced cerium oxide films are characteristic face-centered cubic fluorite structure with 5 ~ 20 nm crystal sizes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study probes the non-stoichiometry property of as-produced films. Raman spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy have been applied to analyze the films as well. Deposition mode, current density, reaction temperature and pH have also been investigated and the deposition condition has been optimized for preferred oriented film formation: galvanostatic deposition with current density of -0.06 mA/cm2, T > 50oC and 7 < pH < 10. Generally, potentiostatic deposition results in random structured cerium oxide films. Sintering of potentiostatic deposited cerium oxide films leads to crystal growth and reach nearly full density at 1100oC. It is demonstrated that in-air heating favors the 1:2 stoichiometry of CeO2. Nanocrystalline cerium oxide powders (4 ~ 10 nm) have been produced with anodic electrochemical synthesis. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were employed to investigate lattice expansion phenomenon related to the nanoscale cerium oxide particles. The pH of reaction solution plays an important role in electrochemical synthesis of cerium oxide films and powder. Cyclic voltammetry and rotation disk electrode voltammetry have been used to study the reaction mechanisms. The results indicate that the film deposition and powder formation follow different reaction schemes. Ce(III)-L complexation is a reversible process, Ce3+ at medium basic pH region (7~10) is electrochemically oxidized to and then CeO2 film is deposited on the substrate. CE mechanism is suggested to be involved in the formation of films, free Ce3+ species is coordinated with OH- at high basic pH region (>10) to Ce2O3 immediately prior to electrochemically oxidation Ce2O3 to CeO2. CeO2 / montmorillonite nanocomposites were electrochemically produced. X-ray ...
Date: December 2003
Creator: Wang, Qi

Fluorination Effect on the Conformational Properties of Alkanes

Description: A Series of fluorophores of the general formular P(CF2)nP and P(CF2)n-1CF3 has been synthesized. Copper catalyzed coupling of 1-bromopyrene and the corresponding mono and di-iodoperfluoroalkanes were used in most cases. For the n=3 dimer, a novel 1,w-perfluoroalkylation of pyrene via bis-decarboxylation of hexafluorogultaric acid was utilized. These compounds, along with suitable hydrocarbon analogs, are being used to study the flexibility of fluorocarbon chains using emission. We have found that the excimer formation for the fluorinated pyrene monomers is highly dependent on concentration and is less efficient than for pyene. Excimer formation for the fluorinated pyrene dimers is much more efficient than for the fluorocarbon monomers and is only slightly concentraion dependent. Steady-state emission spectra indicate hydrocarbon dimers-models form excimers more efficiently than the fluorinated dimers suggesting the fluorinated chains are stiffer than the hydrocarbons. We conducted the temperature-dependent studies and quantified the conformational difference.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Xu, Wenjian

General Chemistry Topic Coverage (GCTC) comparison between community colleges and universities in the United States.

Description: This study is based on survey responses of 224 general chemistry instructors at United States (U.S.) community colleges and universities representing 46 states. The mean values of General Chemistry Topic Coverage (GCTC) score, developed by this researcher specifically for this dissertation study as a measure of course content, were statistically analyzed. The aim of this study is to answer five research questions: (a) Is there a difference in mean GCTC scores between U.S. community colleges and four-year colleges and universities? (b) If there is a difference in mean GCTC score between the two study groups, what are the observed differences in subtopics covered between community colleges and four-year colleges and universities? (c) Considering both community colleges and universities, is there a difference in mean GCTC score between the different designated U.S. regions? (d) Considering both community college and university professors, is there a difference in GCTC score for professors with a master's degree compared to those with a doctorate?, and (e) Is there a correlation between GCTC score and the percentage of students that major in science? Results indicate that there is a statistically significant difference in course content between community colleges and universities, there is a statistically significant difference between different U.S. regions, there is no statistically significant difference between professors with an earned master's versus those with an earned doctorate degree, and there is no statistically significant correlation between general chemistry course content and the percentage of a professor's students majoring in science. Details of the observed differences between community college and university course content are discussed, and recommendations for future research are presented.
Date: December 2006
Creator: El-Ashmawy, Amina Khalifa

Improvement of Homogeneity and Adhesion of Diamond-Like Carbon Films on Copper Substrates

Description: Electrodeposition method is used to deposit diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on copper substrates via anodic oxidation at low temperature. These films are characterized using Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Homogeneity of these films is studied using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Scotch tape peel tests indicate adherent film on copper substrate. Carbon phase transformation is studied using thermal annealing experiments in conjunction with Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A cathodic electrochemical method is also studied to deposit diamond-like carbon films on copper substrates. However, films deposited by the cathodic route have poor adhesion and quality compared to anodically deposited films. It is also possible to grow diamond phase on copper substrates using acetylene in liquid ammonia via electrodeposition route. An electrochemical method is proposed for boron doping into DLC films.
Date: August 2004
Creator: Vavilala, Suma

Interaction of learning approach with concept integration and achievement in a large guided inquiry organic class.

Description: A study was conducted to investigate the relationship of students' concept integration and achievement with time spent within a topic and across related topics in a large first semester guided inquiry organic chemistry class. Achievement was based on evidence of algorithmic problem solving; and concept integration was based on demonstrated performance explaining, applying, and relating concepts to each other. Twelve individual assessments were made of both variables over three related topics - acid/base, nucleophilic substitution and electrophilic addition reactions. Measurements included written, free response and ordered multiple answer questions using a classroom response system. Results demonstrated that students can solve problems without conceptual understanding. A second study was conducted to compare the students' learning approach at the beginning and end of the course. Students were scored on their preferences for a deep, strategic, or surface approach to learning based on their responses to a pre and post survey. Results suggest that students significantly decreased their preference for a surface approach during the semester. Analysis of the data collected was performed to determine the relationship between students' learning approach and their concept integration and achievement in this class. Results show a correlation between a deep approach and concept integration and a strong negative correlation between a surface approach and concept integration.
Date: August 2009
Creator: Mewhinney, Christina

Interfacial Studies of Bimetallic Corrosion in Copper/Ruthenium Systems and Silicon Surface Modification with Organic and Organometallic Chemistry

Description: To form Cu interconnects, dual-damascene techniques like chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) and post-CMP became inevitable for removing the "overburden" Cu and for planarizing the wafer surface. During the CMP processing, Cu interconnects and barrier metal layers experience different electrochemical interactions depending on the slurry composition, pH, and ohmic contact with adjacent metal layers that would set corrosion process. Ruthenium as a replacement of existing diffusion barrier layer will require extensive investigation to eliminate or control the corrosion process during CMP and post CMP. Bimetallic corrosion process was investigated in the ammonium citrate (a complexing agent of Cu in CMP solutions) using micro test patterns and potentiodynamic measurements. The enhanced bimetallic corrosion of copper observed is due to noble behavior of the ruthenium metal. Cu formed Cu(II)-amine and Cu(II)-citrate complexes in alkaline and acidic solutions and a corrosion mechanism has been proposed. The currently used metallization process (PVD, CVD and ALD) require ultra-high vacuum and are expensive. A novel method of Si surface metallization process is discussed that can be achieved at room temperature and does not require ultra-high vacuum. Ruthenation of Si surface through strong Si-Ru covalent bond formation is demonstrated using different ruthenium carbonyl compounds. RBS analysis accounted for monolayer to sub-monolayer coverage of Si surface. Interaction of other metal carbonyl (like Fe, Re, and Rh) is also discussed. The silicon (111) surface modifications with vinyl terminated organic compounds were investigated to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and there after these surfaces were further functionalized. Acrylonitrile and vinylbenzophenone were employed for these studies. Ketone group of vinylbenzophenone anchored to Si surface demonstrated reactivity with reducing and oxidizing agents.
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Date: August 2006
Creator: Nalla, Praveen Reddy

Investigation of Structure and Properties of Low Temperature Deposited Diamond-Like Carbon Films

Description: Electrodeposition is a novel method for fabrication of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on metal substrates. In this work, DLC was electrochemically deposited on different substrates based on an anodic oxidation cyclization of acetylene in liquid ammonia. Successfully anodic deposition was carried out for DLC onto nickel substrate at temperatures below -40°C. Comparative studies were performed on a series of different carbon sources (acetylene, sodium acetylide, and a mixture of acetylene and sodium acetylide). The films were characterized using a variety of methods including Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), XPS valence band spectra, and/or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Raman spectroscopy is used as a bench mark technique to verify the presence of deposited DLC films, to access the films homogeneities, and to provide the ratio of the different carbon phases, mainly disordered graphite (D) and graphite (G) phases in the films. A combination of the Raman with FTIR and valence band spectra analysis allowed the distinction between hydrogenated DLC and unhydrogenated DLC films. Three different kinds of DLC [(1) hydrogenated DLC (a-C:H); (2) tetrahedral hydrogenated DLC (ta-C:H); and (3) graphitic-like DLC] were deposited depending upon the deposition conditions and substrates. Temperature and current density are the most important parameters to govern the quality of the deposited films, where adding of acetylide into the electrolyte led to films with a higher degree of graphitic phases. The proposed mechanism for acetylene anodic oxidation does not involve direct electron transfer but electrochemical cyclization of acetylene radical cations and hydrogen abstraction at the termination steps. Sodium acetylide, however, dissociates to an acetylenic ion, C2H-, in liquid ammonia. The electrochemistry heterogeneity also leads to island and two-dimensional (2D) nucleation growth of DLC films. Different bond formations of metal to carbon and different chemisorptions of acetylene on metal play important roles ...
Date: August 2004
Creator: Pingsuthiwong, Charoendee

Investigation of the Pressure Dependence of SO3 Formation

Description: The kinetics of the pressure dependent O + SO2 + Ar reaction have been investigated using laser photolysis resonance fluorescence at temperatures of 289 K, 399 K, 581 K, 699 K, 842 K and 1040 K and at pressures from 30-665 torr. Falloff was observed for the first time in the pressure dependence. Application of Lindemann theory yielded an Arrhenius expression of k(T) = 3.3 x 10-32exp(-992/T) cm6 molecule-1 s-1 for the low pressure limit and k(T) = 8.47 x 10-14exp(-468/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for the high pressure limit at temperatures between 289 and 842 K. The reaction is unusual as it possesses a positive activation energy at low temperature, yet at higher temperatures the activation energy is negative, illustrating a reaction barrier.
Date: December 2003
Creator: Naidoo, Jacinth

Investigations of Thermochemistry and the Kinetics of H Atom Radical Reactions

Description: The thermochemistry of several species, and the kinetics of various H atom radical reactions relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry were investigated using ab initio theoretical techniques and the flash photolysis / resonance fluorescence technique. Using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations up to the G3 level of theory, the C-H bond strengths of several alkanes were calculated. The bond strengths were calculated using two working reactions. From the results, it is apparent that the bond strengths decrease as methyl groups are added to the central carbon. The results are in good agreement with recent experimental halogenation kinetic studies. Hydrogen bond strengths with sulfur and oxygen were studied via CCSD(T) theory, together with extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. The results for the bond dissociation energies (ground state at 0 K, units: kJ mol-1) are: S-H = 349.9, S-D = 354.7, HS-H = 376.2, DS-D = 383.4, and HO-H = 492.6. These data compare well with experimental literature. The rate constants for the isotopic reactions of H + H2S, D + H2S, H + D2S, and D + D2S are studied at the QCISD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p) level of theory. The contributions of the exchange reaction versus abstraction are examined through transition state theory. The energy of NS was computed via CCSD(T) theory, together with extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. The results were employed with three working reactions to find ΔfH0(NS) = 277.3 ± 2 kJ mol-1 and ΔfH298(NS) = 278.0 ± 2 kJ mol-1. This thermochemistry is consistent with, but much more precise than, earlier literature values. A kinetic study of the reaction of H + CH2CCl2 was conducted over the temperature range of 298 - 680 K. The reaction was found to be pressure dependent and results of the rate constants and their interpretation via unimolecular rate theory are ...
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Date: December 2002
Creator: Peebles, Lynda Renee

Kinetic studies and computational modeling of atomic chlorine reactions in the gas phase.

Description: The gas phase reactions of atomic chlorine with hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, benzene, and ethylene are investigated using the laser flash photolysis / resonance fluorescence experimental technique. In addition, the kinetics of the reverse processes for the latter two elementary reactions are also studied experimentally. The absolute rate constants for these processes are measured over a wide range of conditions, and the results offer new accurate information about the reactivity and thermochemistry of these systems. The temperature dependences of these reactions are interpreted via the Arrhenius equation, which yields significantly negative activation energies for the reaction of the chlorine atom and hydrogen sulfide as well as for that between the phenyl radical and hydrogen chloride. Positive activation energies which are smaller than the overall endothermicity are measured for the reactions between atomic chlorine with ammonia and ethylene, which suggests that the reverse processes for these reactions also possess negative activation energies. The enthalpies of formation of the phenyl and &#946;-chlorovinyl are assessed via the third-law method. The stability and reactivity of each reaction system is further rationalized based on potential energy surfaces, computed with high-level ab initio quantum mechanical methods and refined through the inclusion of effects which arise from the special theory of relativity. Large amounts of spin-contamination are found to result in inaccurate computed thermochemistry for the phenyl and ethyl radicals. A reformulation of the computational approach to incorporate spin-restricted reference wavefunctions yields computed thermochemistry in good accord with experiment. The computed potential energy surfaces rationalize the observed negative temperature dependences in terms of a chemical activation mechanism, and the possibility that an energized adduct may contribute to product formation is investigated via RRKM theory.
Date: August 2009
Creator: Alecu, Ionut M.

Kinetic Studies of Hydroxyl and Hydrogen Atom Reactions

Description: Gas phase kinetics of the reactions involving hydroxyl radical and hydrogen atom were studied using experimental and ab initio theoretical techniques. The rate constant for the H + H2S reaction has been measured from 298 to 598 K by the laser photolysis/resonance fluorescence (LP-RF) technique. The transition state theory (TST) analysis coupled with the measurements support the suggestion that the reaction shows significant curvature in the Arrhenius plot. The LP-RF technique was also used to measure the rate constant of the H + CH3Br reaction over the temperature range 400-813 K. TST and density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the dominant reaction channel is Br-abstraction. The reaction H + CF2=CF-CF=CF2 was first studied by flash photolysis/resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) method. The experiments of this work revealed distinctly non-Arrhenius behavior, which was interpreted in terms of a change in mechanism. DFT calculations suggest that the adduct is CF2H-CF•-CF=CF2. At lower temperatures a mixture of this molecule and CF2•-CFH-CF=CF2 is likely. The theoretical calculations show that H atom migrates in the fluoroethyl radicals through a bridging intermediate, and the barrier height for this process is lower in the less fluorinated ethyl radical. High level computations were also employed in studies of the rate constants of OH + chloroethylenes reactions. VTST calculations indicate that, except the reaction of OH + C2Cl4, these reactions present a complex behavior. For OH + C2Cl4, conventional TST calculation shows a simple positive temperature-dependence behavior.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Hu, Xiaohua

Layered Double Hydroxides and the Origins of Life on Earth

Description: A brief introduction to the current state of research in the Origins of Life field is given in Part I of this work. Part II covers original research performed by the author and co-workers. Layered Double Hydroxide (LDH) systems are anion-exchanging clays that have the general formula M(II)xM(III)(OH)(2x+2)Y, where M(II) and M(III) are any divalent and trivalent metals, respectively. Y can be nearly any anion, although modern naturally occuring LDH systems incorporate carbonate (CO32-), chloride (Cl-), or sulfate (SO42-) anions. Intercalated cobalticyanide anion shows a small yet observable deviation from local Oh symmetry causing small differences between its oriented and non-oriented infrared spectra. Nitroprusside is shown to intercalate into 2:1 Mg:Al LDH with decomposition to form intercalated ferrocyanide and nitrosyl groups of an unidentified nature. The [Ru(CN)6]4- anion is shown to intercalate into layered double hydroxides in the same manner as other hexacyano anions, such as ferrocyanide and cobalticyanide, with its three-fold rotational axis perpendicular to the hydroxide sheets. The square-planar tetracyano-nickelate(II), -palladate(II), and platinate(II) anions were intercalated into both 2:1 and 3:1 Mg:Al layered double hydroxides (LDH). The basal spacings in the 2:1 hosts are approximately 11 Å, indicating that the anions are inclined approximately 75 degrees relative to the hydroxide layers, while in the 3:1 hosts the square-planar anions have enough space to lie more nearly parallel to the LDH cation layers, giving basal spacings of approximately 8 Å. It has been found that the LDH Mg2Al(OH)6Cl catalyzes the self-addition of cyanide, to give in a one-pot reaction at low concentrations an increased yield of diaminomaleonitrile and in addition, at higher ($0.1M) concentrations, a purple-pink material that adheres to the LDH. We are investigating whether this reaction also occurs with hydrotalcite itself, what is the minimum effective concentration of cyanide, and what can be learned about the products ...
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Date: May 2001
Creator: Brister, Brian

Layered Double Hydroxides: Morphology, Interlayer Anion, and the Origins of Life

Description: The preparation of layered double hydroxides via co-precipitation of a divalent/trivalent metal solution against a base results in 1 mm LDH particles with a disorganized metal lattice. Research was performed to address these morphological issues using techniques such as Ostwald ripening and precipitation via aluminate. Another interesting issue in layered double hydroxide materials is the uptake and orientation of anions into the interlayer. Questions about iron cyanide interlayer anions have been posed. Fourier transform infared spectroscopy and powder x-ray diffraction have been used to investigate these topics. It was found that factors such as orientation, anion charge, and anion structure depended on the divalent/trivalent metal ratio of the hydroxide layer and reactivity time. The cyanide self-addition reaction is an important reaction of classical prebiotic chemistry. This reaction has been shown to give rise to amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. At cyanide concentrations similar to that expected on the early earth, hydrolysis to formamide rather than self-addition occurs. One theory to alleviate this side reaction is the use of minerals or clays that are thought to concentrate and catalyze prebiotics of interest. Layered double hydroxides have been studied as a catalyst for this reaction.
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Date: December 2002
Creator: Halcom-Yarberry, Faith Marie

Mechanisms of Methoxide Ion Substitution and Acid- Catalyzed Z/E Isomerization of N-Methoxyimines

Description: The second order rate constants for nucleophilic substitution by methoxide of (Z)- and (E)-O-methylbenzohydroximoyl fluorides [C6H4C(F)=NOCH3] with various substituents on the phenyl ring [p-OCH3 (1h, 2h), p-CH3 (1g, 2g), p-Cl (1f, 2f), p-H (1e, 2e), (3,5)-bis-CF3 (1i, 2i)] in 90:10 DMSO:MeOH have been measured. A Hammett plot of these rate constants vs σ values gave positive ρ values of 2.95 (Z isomer) and 3.29 (E isomer). Comparison of these rates with methoxide substitution rates for Omethylbenzohydroximoyl bromide [C6H4C(Br)=NOCH3] and Omethylbenzohydroximoyl chloride [C6H4C(Cl)=NOCH3] reveal an element effect for the Z isomers of Br:Cl:F(1e) = 2.21:1.00:79.7 and for the E isomers of Cl:F(2e) = 1.00:18.3. With the p-OCH3-imidoyl halides the following element effects are found: Br:Cl:F(1h) = 2.78:1.00:73.1 for the Z isomer and Br:Cl:F(2h) = 1.97:1.00:12.1 for the E isomer. Measurement of activation parameters revealed ∆S≠ = -17 eu for 1e and ∆S≠ = -9.9 eu for 2e. Ab initio calculations (HF/6-31+G*, MP2/6-31+G*//HF/6-31+G*, B3LYP/6- 31+G*//HF/6-31+G*, HF-SCIPCM/6-31+G*//HF/6-31+G*) were performed to define the reaction surface. These calculations demonstrate a relatively large barrier for nucleophilic attack in relation to halogen loss and support the experimental findings that this reaction proceeds by an addition-elimination mechanism (AN# + DN). The imidoyl fluorides have been used to synthesize highly functionalized O-methyloximes by reaction with enolate anions derived from malononitrile, ethyl cyanoacetate, and diethyl malonate. Acid-catalyzed isomerization of compounds containing the O-methyloxime moiety have been investigated with ab initio calculations (HF/6-31+G*, MP2/6- 31+G*//HF/6-31+G*, B3LYP/6-31+G*//HF/6-31+G*). Barriers for rotation around the C-N bond following protonation have been calculated. The calculated barriers are discussed in relation to an isomerization mechanism of protonation-rotation versus a nucleophilic catalysis.
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Date: December 2001
Creator: Dolliver, Debra D.

Metal-Aluminum Oxide Interactions: Effects of Surface Hydroxylation and High Electric Field

Description: Metal and oxide interactions are of broad scientific and technological interest in areas such as heterogeneous catalysis, microelectronics, composite materials, and corrosion. In the real world, such interactions are often complicated by the presence of interfacial impurities and/or high electric fields that may change the thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors of the metal/oxide interfaces. This research includes: (1) the surface hydroxylation effects on the aluminum oxide interactions with copper adlayers, and (2) effects of high electric fields on the interface of thin aluminum oxide films and Ni3Al substrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies and first principles calculations have been carried out to compare copper adsorption on heavily hydroxylated a- Al2O3(0001) with dehydroxylated surfaces produced by Argon ion sputtering followed by annealing in oxygen. For a heavily hydroxylated surface with OH coverage of 0.47 monolayer (ML), sputter deposition of copper at 300 K results in a maximum Cu(I) coverage of ~0.35 ML, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Maximum Cu(I) coverage at 300 K decreases with decreasing surface hydroxylation. Exposure of a partially dehydroxylated a-Al2O3(0001) surface to either air or 2 Torr water vapor results in recovery of surface hydroxylation, which in turn increases the maximum Cu(I) coverage. The ability of surface hydroxyl groups to enhance copper binding suggests a reason for contradictory experimental results reported in the literature for copper wetting of aluminum oxide. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was used to study the high electric field effects on thermally grown ultrathin Al2O3 and the interface of Al2O3 and Ni3Al substrate. Under STM induced high electric fields, dielectric breakdown of thin Al2O3 occurs at 12.3 } 1.0 MV/cm. At lower electric fields, small voids that are 2-8 A deep are initiated at the oxide/metal interface and grow wider and deeper into the metal substrate, which eventually leads to either physical collapse or dielectric ...
Date: December 2001
Creator: Niu, Chengyu

Metallization and Modification of Low-k Dielectric Materials

Description: Aluminum was deposited onto both Teflon AF and Parylene AF surfaces by chemical vapor deposition of trimethylaluminum. This work shows that similar thin film (100 Angstroms) aluminum oxide adlayers form on both polymers at the low temperature dosing conditions used in the studies. Upon anneal to room temperature and above, defluorination of the polymer surfaces increased and resulted in fluorinated aluminum oxide adlayers; the adlayers were thermally stable to the highest temperatures tested (600 K). Angle-resolved spectra showed higher levels of fluorination toward the polymer/adlayer interface region. Copper films were also deposited at low temperature onto Teflon AF using a copper hexafluoroacetylacetonate-cyclooctadiene precursor. Annealing up to 600 K resulted in the loss of precursor ligands and a shift to metallic copper. As with aluminum adlayers, some polymer defluorination and resulting metal (copper) fluoride was detected. Parylene AF and polystyrene films surfaces were modified by directly dosing with water vapor passed across a hot tungsten filament. Oxygen incorporation into polystyrene occurred exclusively at aromatic carbon sites, whereas oxygen incorporation into parylene occurred in both aromatic and aliphatic sites. Oxygen x-ray photoelectron spectra of the modified polymers were comparable, indicating that similar reactions occurred. The surface oxygenation of parylene allowed enhanced reactivity toward aluminum chemical vapor deposition. Silicon-carbon (Si-Cx) films were formed by electron beam bombardment of trimethylvinylsilane films which were adsorbed onto metal substrates at low temperatures in ultra-high vacuum. Oxygen was also added to the films by coadsorbing water before electron beam bombardment; the films were stable to more than 700 K, with increasing silicon-oxygen bond formation at elevated temperatures. Copper metal was sputter deposited in small increments onto non-oxygenated films. X-ray photoelectric spectra show three-dimensional copper growth (rather than layer-by-layer growth), indicating only weak interaction between the copper and underlying films. Annealing at elevated temperatures caused coalescence or growth ...
Date: December 2008
Creator: Martini, David M.

An NMR study of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium and of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium/lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide mixed aggregates

Description: A 1H, 13C, and 6Li NMR study of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium indicated that 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium exists only as a hexameric aggregate over the entire temperature range of 25 to - 92.1 ° C in cyclopentane. Reacting 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium with 2-ethyl-1-butanol resulted in alkyllithium/lithium alkoxide mixed aggregates, apparently of the form Ra(RO)bLia+b. A multinuclear, variable temperature NMR study of samples with O:Li ratios of 0.2 and 0.4 showed, in addition to the alkyllithium, the formation of four mixed aggregates, one of them probably an octamer. Higher O:Li ratio samples showed the formation of several other mixed aggregates. Mixing 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium with independently prepared lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide formed the same mixed aggregates formed by in situ synthesis of lithium alkoxide. Lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide also exists as aggregates in cyclopentane.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Ferreira, Aluisio V. C.

NMR study of 2-ethylhexyllithium aggregate and 2- ethylhexyllithium/lithium 2-ethyl-1-hexoxide mixed aggregates.

Description: A 1H, 13C, and 6Li NMR study of 2-ethylhexyllithium showed that 2- ethylhexyllithium exists solely as a hexamer in cyclopentane solution over the temperature range from 25 to -65 °C. Furthermore, 2-ethylhexyllithium and lithium 2- ethyl-1-hexoxide were shown to form mixed aggregates when the alkoxide was formed in situ by reacting 2-ethylhexyllithium with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. A multinuclear, variable temperature NMR study of a sample with an O:Li ratio of 0.2 led to the identification of at least four such aggregates, one of which was found to be a hexamer with the composition R5(RO)Li6. Studies of samples with higher O:Li ratios, up to 0.8, showed additional mixed aggregates present. All solutions containing mixed aggregates were also shown to contain hydrocarbon soluble lithium hydride. A study of lithium 2-ethyl-1- hexoxide indicated that it aggregates in solution as well.
Date: December 2001
Creator: Petros, Robby A.

NMR Study of n-Propyllithium Aggregates

Description: A variable temperature 1H, 13C, and 6Li NMR study of n-propyl-6Li-lithium showed five different aggregates, similar to that in the literature as (RLi)n, n= 6, 8, 9, 9, 9. There were also a number of additional new species, identified as lithium hydride containing aggregates. Unexpectedly, a series of 13C{1H} 1-D NMR experiments with selective 6Li decoupling showed evidence for 13C-6Li spin-spin coupling between the previously reported (RLi)n aggregates and various hydride species.
Date: December 2002
Creator: Davis, James W.

The performance of density functional theory with the correlation consistent basis sets.

Description: Density functional theory has been used in combination with the correlation consistent and polarization consistent basis sets to investigate the structures and energetics for a series of first-row closed shell and several second-row molecules of potential importance in atmospheric chemistry. The impact of basis set choice upon molecular description has been examined, and irregular convergence of molecular properties with respect to increasing basis set size for several functionals and molecules has been observed. The possible reasons and solutions for this unexpected behavior including the effect of contraction and uncontraction, of the basis set diffuse sp basis functions, basis set superposition error (BSSE) and core-valence sets also have been examined.
Date: August 2005
Creator: Wang, Xuelin

The Performance of Silicon Based Sensor and its Application in Silver Toxicity Studies

Description: The silicon based sensor is able to detect part per trillion ionic silver in 0.0098% hydrofluoric acid based on the open circuit potential (OCP) measurement. The OCP jump of 100 ppt ionic silver solution is up to 120 mV. The complex agent can effectively suppress the ionic silver concentration and suppress the OCP signal. The ability of complex agent to suppress the OCP signal depends on the formation constant of the complex with silver. The complex adsorbed on the sensor surface induces a second OCP jump, the height of the second jump depends on the formation constant of the complex. The MINEQL chemical equilibrium modeling program is used to calculate the ionic silver concentration when complex agent presents, a discrepancy is found between the MINEQL simulation result and the OCP signal of the silicon based sensor. The toxicity of ionic silver to C. dubia is studied parallel to the OCP signal of silicon based sensor. Less toxicity is found when the complex agent is present similar to the OCP signal. Another discrepancy is found between the MINEQL simulation and the toxicity test when MINEQL simulation is used to predict and control the ionic silver concentration. The data from both biosensor C. dubia and silicon based sensor support each other and both are not in agreement with MINEQL simulation prediction.
Date: August 2000
Creator: Peng, Haiqing