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Age, Growth, and Food Habits of the Largemouthed Black Bass (Micropterus Salmoides) and the Spotted Bass (Micropterus Puctulatus SSP) in North and East Texas Lakes

Description: This study is based on the examinations and analyses of 388 largemouthed black bass (Micropterus salmoides) and 118 spotted black bass (Micropterus puctulatus ssp.) which were collected over a period of three years from 9 lakes in the North-Central and East Texas areas. The results should show the following: (1) the average age of the black bass in each of the nine reservoirs in Texas; (2) the growth rate of the bass in these reservoirs; (3) the feeding habits of the bass in all reservoirs studied; (4) a comparison of the growth rates of the largemouthed and spotted basses; and (5) a comparison of the growth rates of bass from Texas and Oklahoma.
Date: 1950
Creator: Cooper, William A.

Aging Is a Determinant in Anoxia Stress Tolerance in Caenorhabditis Elegans

Description: Oxygen availability is critical for survival for most organisms. The nematode, C. elegans, has been useful for studying genetic regulation of anoxia tolerance due to the oxygen deprivation response mechanisms shared with other metazoans. Studies examining long-term anoxia (72h, LTA) tolerance have only been conducted at adult day 1. To investigate the effect of aging on anoxia tolerance wild-type and mutant strains were exposed to LTA between adult day 1 and day 9. Wild-type isolates and daf-16(mu86) (FOXO transcription factor regulated by insulin-signaling) and aak-2(gt33) (catalytic subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase) strains were anoxia sensitive at day 1 and displayed increased LTA tolerance with aging correlated with reproductive senescence followed by a decline in survivorhsip through day 9. The daf-2(e1370) (insulin receptor homologue of C. elegans), glp-1(e2141) (a lin-12/Notch receptor) and fog-2(q71) (required for spermatogenesis) strains were LTA-tolerant through day 5. I conclude that aging influences LTA-tolerance in a strain- and age-dependent manner. In addition to being LTA-tolerant the daf-2(e1370) and glp-1(e2141) strains have a longevity phenotype that is suppressed by loss of kri-1 or daf-12. While loss of kri-1 did not suppress the LTA-tolerant phenotype of glp-1(e2141) at day 1 the portion of impaired survivors increased at day 3 and by day 5 tolerance was suppressed. Similarly, when exposed to 4 days of anoxia the glp-1(e2141);daf-12(rh41rh611) double mutant had a reduced survivor rate at all ages analyzed compared to glp-1(e2141) controls. To better understand formation of an anoxia-tolerant physiology I exposed adults to one or more 24h bouts. Recurrent bouts increased LTA tolerance in wild-type hermaphrodites in a dose-dependent manner. Bout-treated daf-16(mu86) animals had increased survival rate compared to controls yet maximum survival remained below age-matched wild-type. Anoxia bouts decreased LTA-tolerance in aak-2(gt33) mutants, indicating the requirement for ATP regulation in establishing an LTA-tolerant phenotype. These data support the ...
Date: May 2013
Creator: Goy, Jo M.

Alterations in Human Baroreceptor Reflex Regulation of Blood Pressure Following 15 Days of Simulated Microgravity Exposure

Description: Prolonged exposure to microgravity is known to invoke physiological changes which predispose individuals to orthostatic intolerance upon readaptation to the earth's gravitational field. Attenuated baroreflex responsiveness has been implicated in contributing to this inability to withstand orthostatic stress. To test this hypothesis, eight individuals were exposed to 15 days of simulated microgravity exposure using the 6° head-down bed rest model. Prior to, and after the simulated microgravity exposure, the following were assessed: a) aortic baroreflex function; b) carotid baroreflex function; c) cardiopulmonary baroreflex function; and d) the degree of interaction between the cardiopulmonary and carotid baroreflexes.
Date: August 1993
Creator: Crandall, Craig G. (Craig Gerald)

An Analysis of Distribution Patterns of Amphibians and Reptiles in Texas

Description: The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the distribution of amphibians and reptiles in Texas by means of the methods of Webb and Hagmeier and Stults. An additional graphical analysis was made, including range and range limits which provides a cross-section of faunal change along selected base lines across the state.
Date: August 1969
Creator: Leonard, Cuyler Hershey

Analysis of the Trypanosoma brucei Genome and Identification and Characterization of a Gene Family Encoding Putative EF-Hand Calcium-Binding Proteins

Description: The flagellum of Trypanosoma brucei contains a family of antigenically related EF-hand calcium-binding proteins which are called the calflagins. Genomic Southern blots indicated that multiple copies of calflagin genes occur in T brucei. All of the copies were contained in a single 23 kb Xhol-Xhol fragment. Genomic fragments of 2.5 and 1.7 kb were cloned that encoded calflagin sequences. Two new members of the calflagin family were found from genomic clone sequences. The deduced amino acid sequences of the genomic clones showed the calflagin genes were arranged tandemly along the genomic fragments and were similar to previously described calflagins. The calflagin genes were related by two unrelated 3' flanking sequences. An open reading frame that was unrelated to any calflagin was found at the 5' end of the 2.5 kb genomic fragment. Each encoded protein (~24,000u) contained three EF-hand calcium-binding motifs and one degenerate EF-hand motif. In general, variability among the T. brucei calflagins is greater than related proteins in T. lewisii and T. cruzi. This variability results from amino acid substitutions at the amino and carboxy termini, and duplication of internal segments.
Date: May 1998
Creator: DeFord, James H. (James Henry), 1956-

Anatomical and Morphological Responses of Cardiospermum Halicacabum L. (Balloon Vine), to Four Levels of Water Availability

Description: C. halicacabum (Sapindaceae) is an invasive plant that is considered a nuisance species in Texas riparian environments. Little is known of the tolerance of C. halicacabum to flooding and drought; however, this information may provide insight into the characteristics that contribute to C. halicacabum purported invasiveness. C. halicacabum seedlings (n = 92) were exposed to one of four levels of water availability (flooded, saturated, intermediate and dry) over six weeks under greenhouse conditions. Plant performance was affected by water availability; however, there was no effect on survivorship. Flooded and saturated plants exhibited morphological adaptations; producing adventitious roots, hypertrophy, and aerenchyma tissue. Morphological measures, anatomical responses, and patterns of biomass allocation all indicate that C. halicacabum is able to survive periodic inundation, perform in saturation, and establish and thrive on the drier end of a moisture gradient.
Date: May 2011
Creator: Dempsey, Matthew Anthony

Anatomy and Physiology Syllabus for Community Colleges

Description: This syllabus includes both lecture notes and laboratory activities for a two-semester anatomy and physiology community college course. The syllabus is based on a 16-week semester that is comprised of a three-hour lecture section and a one-hour laboratory class each week. Both the lecture course and laboratory are necessary to fulfill the requirement for anatomy and physiology. Laboratory activities coincide with lectures to enhance understanding of each topic by providing visual and hands-on experiments for the concepts learned in the lecture. Laboratory quizzes will be given each week to help students maintain a working knowledge of the material learned in the laboratory. This course is appropriate for the typical anatomy and physiology student and should benefit both students who plan to major in biology and also those who are non-biology majors. Because subject matter in anatomy and physiology is quite difficult, the importance of attendance and good study skills is stressed.
Date: May 2000
Creator: Schulz, Leslie

The Antibiotic Activities of Some Members of the Cactaceae Family

Description: This problem has been concerned with, first, the collection of sixteen species of plants belonging to Cactaceae family; second, the drying of these and the extraction of the oleoresins thereof; third, the determination of the extent to which these substances inhibit the growth of ten gram-positive and ten gram-negative bacterial organisms; and fourth, a determination of the possible utilization of these extracts a prophylactic or chemotherapeutic agents.
Date: 1951
Creator: Gilmore, Derward E.

The Antibiotic Properties of the Oleoresins of Twenty-Five Common Garden Vegetables

Description: The purpose of this problem is to determine the presence and extent of antibiotic materials as found in the oleoresins of a selected group of garden vegetables. The problem has consisted of, first, the collection and preparation of specimens of twenty-five commonly used garden vegetables; second, the extraction of the oleoresins from these; third, the determination of the inhibitory and other effects of these oleoresins against several strains of selected gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria; and fourth, the evaluation of the potentialities of these oleoresins with regard to their future use as medicinal prophylactics and therapeutics.
Date: 1951
Creator: Ennis, Arthur F.

Application of Cultured Neuronal Networks for Use as Biological Sensors in Water Toxicology and Lipid Signaling.

Description: This dissertation research explored the capabilities of neuronal networks grown on substrate integrated microelectrode arrays in vitro to be applied to toxicological research and lipid signaling. Chapter 1 details the effects of chlorine on neuronal network spontaneous electrical activity and pharmacological sensitivity. This study demonstrates that neuronal networks can maintain baseline spontaneous activity, and respond normally to pharmacological manipulations in the present of three times the chlorine present in drinking water. The findings suggest that neuronal networks may be used as biological sensors to monitor the quality of water and the presence of novel toxicants that cannot be detected by conventional sensors. Chapter 2 details the neuromodulatory effects of N-acylethanolamides (NAEs) on the spontaneous electrical activity of neuronal networks. NAEs are a group of lipids that can mimic the effects of marijuana and can be derived from a variety of plant sources including soy lecithin. The most prominent NAEs in soy lecithin, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and linoleoylethanolamide (LEA), were tested individually and were found to significantly inhibit neuronal spiking and bursting activity. These effects were potentiated by a mixture of NAEs as found in a HPLC enriched fraction from soy lecithin. Cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1-R) antagonists and other cannabinoid pathway modulators indicated that the CB1-R was not directly involved in the effects of NAEs, but that enzymatic degradation and cellular uptake were more likely targets. The results demonstrate that neuronal networks may also be a viable platform for the elucidation of biochemical pathways and drug mechanisms of action.
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Date: August 2004
Creator: Dian, Emese Emöke

Application of Fluorescent Antibody Methods for the Enumeration and Identification of Bacillus Cereus

Description: This particular work is proposed as a test of the expedience of using the fluorescent-antibody technique as a method for enumeration and identification of certain strains of B. cereus that have been found to be effective in preventing taste and odor in water supplies resulting from certain Actinomycete blooms.
Date: August 1969
Creator: Ferebee, Robert Newton

Applications of Remote Sensing and GIS to Modeling Fire for Vegetative Restoration in Northern Arizona

Description: An accurate fire model is a useful tool in predicting the behavior of a prescribed fire. Simulation of fire requires an extensive amount of data and can be accomplished best using GIS applications. This paper demonstrates integrative procedures of using of ArcGIS™, ERDAS Imagine™, GPS, and FARSITE© to predict prescribed fire behavior on the Kaibab-Paiute Reservation. ArcGIS was used to create a database incorporating all variables into a common spatial reference system and format for the FARSITE model. ArcGIS Spatial Analyst was then used to select optimal burn sites for simulation. Our predictions will be implemented in future interagency efforts towards vegetative restoration on the reservation.
Date: August 2003
Creator: Hardison, Tanya

Aquatic Vegetation Nutrient Budgets and Sedimentation in a Southwestern Reservoir

Description: During four growing seasons, aquatic vascular plant production and distribution were studied in Pat Mayse Lake, Texas, a 2425 hectare oligo-mesotrophic reservoir. The dominant macrophyte population was Myriophyllum spicatum L. Growth rates and regrowth rates of mechanically harvested Myriophyllum beds were found to be dissimilar. Based on estimates of watermilfoil nutrient content, there were insufficient nutrients in the entire population to alter the trophic status of this reservoir should all of the nutrients be instantaneously released. Sediments were the primary nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) sink. Bank erosion and solids transport from the watershed appear to contribute most of the sediments and a lake-wide mean sedimentation rate of 2.5 cm/year was estimated from sediment trap and core sample data.
Date: May 1986
Creator: Clifford, Philip A. (Philip Alan)