UNT Libraries - 60 Matching Results

Search Results

The Genetics of Pigmentation in Corynebacterium poinsettiae ATCC 9682

Description: Corynebacterium poinsettiae mutant strains blocked in carotenoid biosynthesis were obtained by treatment with the mutagen N-methyl-N1-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Additional carotenoid (Crt) mutant strains were obtained from a previous study conducted in our laboratory. Fifty-nine Crt mutants affected in carotenoid biosynthesis were examined by a normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. Pigment extracts of Crt mutants and C. poinsettiae wild type strains were resolved by an isocratic system with hexane:acetone:dicholoromethane, 11.35:1.73:1.00 (by vol.) as the eluting solvent. In addition to the five major peaks, twelve minor peaks were observed in the wild type C. poinsettiae strain used in this study. Crt mutant and wild type strain peak heights were measured from the individual chromatograms and the peak height data set created was analyzed using the Statistical Analysis System program to perform a cluster analysis. The cluster analysis revealed five carotenoid mutant groups. Carotenoid pigments which accumulated or were absent in each of the cluster groups are reported. Cluster group 1 mutants (CrtA) are blocked in the dehydrogenase(s) which is(are) responsible for the dehydrogenations between phytoene and lycopene. Cluster group 2 mutants (CrtB) appear to be blocked at a second dehydrogenase specific for the dehydrogenation from C.p. 470 to C.p. 496. Cluster group 3 mutants (CrtC) are blocked at a cyclization step in the pathway which involves cyclization of C.p. 496 to C.p. 470 and which may cyclize C.p. 473 to C.p. 450. The genes CrtA and CrtB map only 0.5 map units from each other while CrtA and CrtC map 2.1 map units from one another. Mutants which accumulate end products but which lack certain precursors indicate a branched pathway for pigment biosynthesis exists in this organism. Media for the formation, fusion and regeneration of C. poinsettiae protoplasts are reported and a protocol for the use of these media in genetic ...
Date: August 1986
Creator: Campbell, Alan L. (Alan Lee)

Hooking Mortality of Largemouth Bass Caught on Controversial Artificial Lures and Live Bait : Lake Ray Roberts, Texas

Description: A total of 192 largemouth bass were caught at Lake Ray Roberts, Texas (1995) to investigate five controversial bass angling techniques relative to hooking mortality. The bait types were Texas-rigged scented and non-scented plastic worms, Carolina-rigged scented and non-scented plastic worms, and live golden shiners. Overall hooking mortality was 21.87% and mortality was dependent upon bait type. Highest mortality resulted from the Texas-rigged scented lures, while the lowest mortality was generated by live golden shiners. A creel survey indicated that few anglers were having success with the investigated baits. Factors that had a confirmed effect on hooking mortality were hooking location and water temperature. Hooking mortality was not excessive compared to other similar studies.
Date: May 1996
Creator: Alumbaugh, Andrew E. (Andrew Edward)

In Vitro Cortical Networks for Disease Modeling and Drug Evaluation

Description: In translational research, disease models in preclinical studies are used as media for discovery of drugs or novel therapeutics. Development of in vitro models for various neurological diseases that enable efficient pharmacological or toxicological screening has been ongoing but challenging. Recognizing the potential benefit of in vitro disease models, dysfunctions in the cortical neuronal networks were induced to mimic the functional pathology of neurological symptoms using microelectrode arrays. Two different disease states – tinnitusand excitotoxicity – were investigated and discussed. In this model, pentylenetetrazol-induced increase in spontaneous firing rate and synchrony in the auditory cortical networks was used as correlate of tinnitus. Potential tinnitus treatment drugs from several different classes – including the novel class of potassium channel openers – were screened and quantified. The potentialtherapeutic values of these drugs were also discussed as the basis for drug repurposing. Functional excitotoxicity was induced by cisplatin (a cancer drug that causes neurological sideeffects) and glutamate (the major excitatory neurotransmitter). As proof-of-principle that the model may contribute to expediting the development of therapeutics, cisplatin excitotoxicity wasprevented by the antioxidant D-methionine, while glutamate excitotoxicity was prevented by ceftriaxone (a modulator of a glutamate reuptake transporter). In the latter part of the study, with results linking two of the screened drugs L-carnitine and D-methionine to GABAA receptor activation, it was demonstrated that this model not only served as an efficient drug-screening platform, but can be utilized to functionally investigate the underlying mechanism of drugs. Inaddition, several practical or conceptual directions for future studies to improve on this in vitro disease model are suggested.
Date: December 2013
Creator: Wu, Calvin

In Vitro Studies of Nuclear Changes in Mammalian CNS Neurons Subjected to Rapid Acceleration Impact Injury

Description: An in vitro model of Rapid Acceleration Impact (RAI) Injury was used to study the effects of multiple impact (220 g/impact, 3-5 sec intervals) trauma on cultures of murine CNS cells. Investigations with spinal cord cultures showed that 1) multiple impacts delivered tangential to the plane of cell growth caused neuronal death (12% after 3 impacts to 46% after 10 impacts); 2) multiple impacts delivered normal to the plane of cell growth were much less effective (8% dead after 10 impacts); 3) most neuronal death occurred within 15 minutes after injury 4) morphological changes observed included increased nuclear prominence and somal swelling; and 5) pretreatment with ketamine (0.1mM) reduced cell death from 51 to 14% and reduced somal swelling. Identical studies performed on cortical cultures revealed minimal differences between the two tissues in their response to multiple tangential impacts.
Date: May 1995
Creator: Wolf, Amy

Influence of Acclimation and Acclimatization to Seasonal Temperatures on Metabolism and Energetics in the Rusty Lizard Sceloporus Olivaceus

Description: Rates and energy equivalents of consumption (C), egestion+ excretion (FU) , assimilation (A), respiration (R) and production (P) were measured in two groups of Sceloporus olivaceus: 1) a laboratory group acclimated at four seasonally encountered temperatures (15, 20, 25 and 30°C) ; and 2) four acclimatization groups collected at different seasons when ambient temperatures corresponded to 15, 20, 25 and 30°C.
Date: May 1973
Creator: Dutton, Ronald Hugh

Interaction of Microwaves and Germinating Seeds

Description: This investigation was concerned with determining the interaction of microwaves with germinating seeds. This study covers two different approaches. The preliminary efforts covered the response of germinating seeds to treatment by microwaves and heat. The second phase of the investigation used microwaves as a probe to determine some of the processes of early seed germination. The preliminary investigation measured the internal metabolic process by ATP production. Leakage of ions and organic material from germinating seeds indicated that membranes are a target of microwaves and heat. Electron photo-micrographs showed an increase in damage to membranes as heat and microwave treatments were increased. The second phase of this investigation was concerned with determining some of the biological activity at the initiation of germination of wheat seeds, Triticum aestivum L., using a resonating microwave cavity oscillating at 9.3 GHz as a probe. Direct current conductivity measurements were also made on the seeds as a means of confirming the observations made with the microwave cavity. There was no observable difference between treatment by UHF or heat in the ultrastructure of germinating seeds. A dielectric response far above that of free water was found as live seeds of wheat began to imbibe water. This effect was assumed to be due to the release of ions, because conductivity increased as corresponding quantities of water were imbibed; and both conductivity and dielectric response decreased as imbibition progressed. Although dead seeds also imbibe water, they do not show this decrease in dielectric response. The dielectric response of live seeds was reduced after the initial imbibition, showing that water became tightly bound as imbibition progressed. The dielectric response of actively growing shoots from the seeds was much less than that of the seeds themselves. The large quantity of water in the shoots is assumed to be immobile, being tightly ...
Date: August 1987
Creator: Shafer, Floyd L. (Floyd Lorenz)

Investigation of the Pharmacokinetics of Diazepam in Juvenile Channel Catfish (Ictalurus Punctatus)

Description: The presence of pharmaceuticals in the environment is becoming an increasing regulatory and scientific concern. Thus, the metabolic profile and bioconcentration potential of diazepam, a model benzodiazepine, were examined, as well as effects on the endocrine system in channel catfish. Through the use of specific and non-specific cytochrome P450 (CYP450) inhibitors, it was determined that CYP3A-like enzymes may play a role in the biotransformation of diazepam into temazepam; however, the isoform(s) required for the formation of other metabolites is still unknown. Overall, only around 7-8% of diazepam is biotransformed into two known metabolites. Due to the lack of inherent metabolism of diazepam in channel catfish, further analysis was conducted to determine the tissue-specific bioconcentration potential of diazepam in catfish. Various tissues were analyzed for the presence of diazepam as well as metabolites and bioconcentration factors (BCF) were calculated, which were all well below regulatory threshold values (> 2000). Additionally, modulation of the endocrine system by diazepam was examined by measuring steroid hormone concentrations and analyzing mRNA expression of selected steroidogenic enzymes and receptors. Two steroidogenic enzymes were modulated following diazepam exposure, indicating potential endocrine disrupting properties of diazepam. Together, these data suggest that diazepam exhibits low metabolic transformation rates in channel catfish, which may lead to accumulation of benzodiazepine compounds that may negatively affect the endocrine system. However, further studies should be aimed at identifying other steroidogenic enzymes and/or receptors that may be modulated following diazepam exposure.
Date: December 2013
Creator: Overturf, Carmen L.

The Life History of the Mayfly Isonychia sicca (Walsh) (Ephemeroptera--Siphlonuridae) in an Intermittent Stream in North Central Texas

Description: The life history of Isonychia sicca (Walsh) was elucidated from samples collected at Clear Creek from Oct. 1976-Jun. 1978, and Elm Fork of the Trinity River from Sept. 1977-Jun. 1978, Denton County, Texas. Adaptations for existence in an intermittent stream were of primary concern. Eggs are capable of diapausing through hot, dry summers and cold, wet or dry winters. Diapause is broken in the fall after rehydration and/or in the spring. I. sicca is usually bivoltine during a Sept.-Jul. wet period. Observations from Elm Fork indicate that emergence continues to Oct. if the stream remains permanent. Considerable overlap occurs between overwintering, spring, and summer populations.
Date: December 1978
Creator: Grant, Peter M., fl. 1978-

Limitation of Primary Productivity in a Southwestern Reservoir Due to Thermal Pollution

Description: Evidence is presented to support the conclusions that (1) North Lake reservoir is less productive, contains lower standing crops of phytoplankton and total organic carbon than other local reservoirs; (2) that neither the phytoplankton nor their instantaneously-determined primary productivity was detrimentally affected by the power plant entrainment and (3) that the effect of the power plant is to cause nutrient limitation of the phytoplankton primary productivity by long-term, subtle, thermally-linked nutrient precipitation activities.
Date: August 1977
Creator: Stuart, Tom J.
Location Info:

Lipids and Phospholipase Activity of Vibrio Cholerae

Description: One purpose of this investigation is to determine the fatty acid and lipid content of typical Vibrio cholerae cells. The comparison of cholera lipid constituents with those of closely-related bacteria might be of taxonomic value. Furthermore, chemical characterization of the cholera vibrio could provide useful criteria for identification of these disease-producing microorganisms.
Date: August 1972
Creator: Brian, Buford Leo

Measurement of Feedback Inhibition In Vivo and Selection of ATCase Feedback Altered Mutants in Salmonella typhimurium

Description: Aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase; encoded by pyrBI genes) is one of the most studied regulatory enzymes in bacteria. It is feedback inhibited by cytidine triphosphate (CTP) and activated by adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Much is known about the catalytic site of the enzyme, not nearly as much about the regulatory site, to which CTP binds. Until now a positive selection for feedback-modified mutants was not available. The selection we have developed involves the use of a pyrA deletion in S. typhimurium. This strain lacks carbamoylphosphate and requires both a pyrimidine and arginine for growth. In this strain citrulline is used to satisfy the pyrimidine and arginine requirements. The minimal flow through the pyrimidine pathway from the citrulline-produced carbamoylphosphate is exquisitely sensitive to feedback control of ATCase by CTP. By elevating the CTP pool, via exogenous cytidine, in a strain that also contains a cytidine deaminase mutant (cdd) growth can be stopped completely, indicating 100% inhibition. It was therefore possible to measure in vivo feedback inhibition of ATCase among the citrulline users and to isolate a family of ATCase regulatory mutants with either modified or no response to effectors.
Date: August 1989
Creator: Bailey, Andrea J., 1952-

Mixed Culture of Chlorella Pyrenoidosa TX71105 and a Variant Strain of Bacillus Megaterium

Description: Very little work has been done on bacteria capable of significantly inhibiting algal growth. This thesis reports the research on mixed cultures of a high-temperature strain of algae, Chlorella pyrenoidosa TX71105, and an organism isolated from the air and tentatively identified as a variant strain of Bacillus megaterium.
Date: August 1970
Creator: Yao, Raymond Che-Fong

Nesting Ecology and Reproductive Correlates in the Desert-nesting Gray Gull Larus Modestus

Description: General objectives of my study were to describe the reproductive ecology of gray gulls in the large Lealtad colony, with emphasis on demographic parameters and physiological adaptations of eggs and chicks, which would complete some original objectives established in the early 1980's by Guerra and Fitzpatrick. Specifically, my study focused on describing, then comparing with other desert and non-desert nesting larids, interactive effects of ambient physical conditions and nest-site predation on eggs and chicks.
Date: May 1993
Creator: Aguilar Pulido, Roberto E. (Roberto Eric)

Neuroregulation and Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation in Ascaris Suum Obliquely Striated Skeletal Muscle

Description: Extraction and quantitation of myosin light chain two coupled with myograph recordings from Ascaris muscle perfused with calmodulin inhibitors and neurotransmitters in conjunction with their respective agonists and antagonists have been used to establish the regulation of contraction in this muscle. Densitometric tracings of isolectric focusing gels separating the regulatory light chain were used to quantitate phosphorylation in resting, contracted and flaccid muscle. These studies indicated that inhibitory neurostimulation is mediated by a true GABA receptor. Myosin-mediated contraction is responsible for maintaining the level of tension observed in resting actin-mediated muscle. Actin-mediated contraction is responsible for the rapid rise in tension following excitatory stimuli. Both systems function simultaneously and are independant.
Date: August 1985
Creator: Martin, Rex E. (Rex Edward)

Nutrient Effects on Autofragmentation of Myriophyllum Spicatum L.

Description: A 2 x 2 factorial design investigated effects of sediment nitrogen and water potassium levels on autofragment production. Reduced nitrogen levels significantly increased autofragment production whereas potassium levels did not significantly alter production. Up to 50% of autofragment production abscised from parent plants grown under low nitrogen conditions compared to 12% or less under high nitrogen conditions.
Date: August 1998
Creator: Smith, Dian H. (Dian Helen)

Opioid/Adrenergic Interaction in Regulating Canine Cardiac Function

Description: Opioid/adrenergic interactions were studied to evaluate two hypotheses: (1) naloxone potentiates the effect of epinephrine on cardiac contractility by increasing circulating epinephrine concentrations; and (2) endogenous and exogenous opioids alter left cardiac nerve stimulationinduced norepinephrine release and cardiac function. A canine isolated heart-lung preparation was used for the first study. Plasma epinephrine was determined and myocardial epinephrine uptake was calculated during intravenous epinephrine infusion. Naloxone (4 mg) was given and the epinephrine infusion was repeated. Naloxone increased cardiac contractility, coronary blood flow, and the coronary sinus epinephrine concentration. When coronary blood flow was subsequently held constant (100% above resting), naloxone increased only contractility. This result indicated that the previously observed increase in coronary sinus epinephrine was flow dependent. Corticosterone (an uptake II blocker) was employed as a positive control. Corticosterone increased the contractile response to epinephrine, but unlike naloxone, corticosterone was accompanied by a clear decrease in myocardial epinephrine uptake. The stereospecificity of the response to naloxone was investigated and (+) naloxone equaled or exceeded (-) naloxone in potentiating the inotropic effect of epinephrine. In the second study, the left cardiac nerve was isolated and electrically stimulated in intact dogs. Norepinephrine overflow gradually declined during successive control stimulations. Pretreatment with naloxone (100 Mg/kg) prevented or delayed the decline. An intracoronary dynorphin 1-9 infusion (2 nmol/min/kg for 20 minutes) reduced both norepinephrine overflow and cardiac performance, and both effects were prevented by pretreatment with naloxone (100 /xg/kg) . To summarize, naloxone potentiated the inotropic effect of infused epinephrine without altering circulating epinephrine concentrations or myocardial epinephrine uptake. This effect of naloxone was not stereospecific and probably not mediated through a traditional opiate receptor. Endogenous and exogenous opioids inhibited the left cardiac nerve stimulation-induced norepinephrine overflow, suggesting that opiate receptors may regulate cardiac excitability by modulating norepinephrine release.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Gu, Hong

Oral Microbiology

Description: Recent studies regarding research on oral microorganisms and the oral diseases are presented. The normal flora of the mouth and the oral environment are first described. Dental plaque and dental caries are primary causes of oral disease. Streptococcus mutans is the major contributor in the initiation and progression of dental caries. Lactobacillus, Actinomyces, and Veillonella are other genera of bacteria linked to dental caries. Periodontitis and gingivitis are periodontal diseases that are caused by oral microorganisms. New research has indicated that various antimicrobial agents and techniques to eliminate or lessen the severity of periodontal diseases. Premature delivery of low birth weight babies in pregnant women has been strongly linked to periodontal disease. Present and future microbiological tests are available to easily determine the causative organisms for most oral diseases that help in diagnosis and treatment of a particular disease.
Date: August 1998
Creator: Osman, Shaiesta

Phagocytosis by Earthworm Coelomocytes : A Biomarker for Immunotoxicity of Hazardous Waste Site Soils

Description: Several biomarkers (cell viability and phagocytosis) based on earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) immune cells (coelomocytes), together with whole-worm mortality (LC/LD50's), were used to assess a bioremediation attempt to reduce pentachlorophenol (PCP) toxicity in a former wood processing hazardous waste site (HWS).
Date: December 1997
Creator: Giggleman, Marina A.

Physiological Effects of Ascaris Suum Intestinal Microflora on 5-Hydroxytryptamine Level and Binding Sites in the Intestinal Epithelial Cells

Description: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been shown to activate carbohydrate metabolism in adult female Ascaris suum. Serotonin may be either absorbed directly from the environment or synthesized de novo from the absorbed L-tryptophan in adult female A. suum. The enzymes necessary for the synthesis of 5-HT have been identified in both intestine and muscle tissues. The serotonin absorbed from the environment is obtained either from the host's gastrointestinal contents or from the 5-HT producing bacteria in the intestine of A. suum. Numerous 5-HT producing bacteria were identified in the intestinal microflora. The physiological contributions of 5-HT producing bacteria to the 5-HT level, turnover and binding sites in the intestinal tissue of A. suum were investigated.
Date: December 1991
Creator: Shahkolahi, Akbar Mohammadpour

Population Dynamics of Macrobenthos in a Regulated Stream 1970-71 and 1978

Description: Stability of the macrobenthic community in a regulated section of the Brazos River, Texas, was evaluated. Physicochemical data and information on spatial distribution of macrobenthos were collected. Populations of two invertebrate species, Isonychia sicca and Neoperla clymene, had been greatly reduced since 1970-71 and I. sicca had been practically eliminated from this section of the Brazos. Three other insect populations, Choroterpes mexicanus, Cheumatopsche campyla and Cheumatopsyche lasia, had more than doubled their numbers since the 1970-71 study. A physicochemical gradient existed in this regulated section of the Brazos but it appeared to have changed little in comparison of earlier chemical data. A gradation of the macrobenthic community was evident as distance from the dam increased,
Date: August 1981
Creator: Coulter, James D. (James Duard)

Pre-Impoundment Estimations of Nutrient Loading to Ray Roberts Lake and Prediction of Post-Inundation Trophic Status

Description: Excessive nutrient loading of natural and artificial lakes has led, in some systems, to plethoric algal and aquatic macrophyte growth which can result in aesthetic degradation and undesirable tastes and odors. It would be advantageous to have some indication of the potential trophic status of a reservoir before it is filled. An objective of this study was to assess the water quality and nutrient loading potential of the tributaries entering Ray Roberts Lake, a large reservoir located in north central Texas. Samples from a maximum of thirteen sites were collected on the Elm Fork, Trinity River, Isle duBois Creek, and five additional tributaries. Data were also collected during six storms, from atmospheric deposition collectors, and from soil-water microcosms. The relationship between watershed landuse and mean water nutrient concentrations was evaluated. Significant differences will exist between the two major arms of Ray Roberts Lake: Elm Fork, Trinity River and Isle duBois Creek. While the majority of the annual phosphorus and nitrogen load entering both tributaries is coming from overland flow, the proportion is higher in Isle duBois Creek. Point sources in the Elm Fork contribute a larger percentage of the bioavailable phosphorus, which is significantly greater than in Isle duBois Creek. The water quality of Isle duBois Creek, especially nitrogen, is affected to a greater degree by the landuses in its watershed. Predictive regression models made accurate estimations of stream nutrient concentrations in Isle duBois Creek. The entire reservoir, upon reaching equilibrium conditions, will be classified as a eutrophic lake. The Trinity arm, with a higher phosphorus load, will display a higher trophic status. The Isle duBois arm has a lower phosphorus load which will give it a lower trophic status. The long hydraulic residence time of the two arms of the reservoir will remove nutrients upstream of the main body, ...
Date: May 1988
Creator: Pillard, David Alan, 1958-

Primary Productivity and Community Metabolism in a Small North Central Texas Pond Ecosystem

Description: Rates of primary production and community metabolism were monitored over a one year period using the diurnal oxygen method. Certain physico-chemical parameters were also measured, and autotrophic standing crops were estimated. An in-depth study was made of the phytoplankton community and various diversity indicies were calculated. Simple correlations were run between all parameters measured (biotic and abiotic), and their inter-relationships examined. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to develop equations predictive of production and community metabolism. Bluegreen algae were the dominant phytoplankters with blooms occurring in late summer and fall. Yearly mean production was approximately 21 kcal per meter square per day with a mean photosynthetic efficiency of 1.2 per cent. Of the various parameters measured turbidity and water temperature were most important in determining rates of primary production.
Date: August 1975
Creator: Kelly, Martin H.