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Bandanna, An Opera by Daron Aric Hagen with Libretto by Paul Muldoon, Commissioned by the College Band Directors National Association: The Origins of an Artwork with a Glimpse at its Musical Character Development

Description: All information for this study was obtained by original source documents, interviews with the principal participants and the personal observations of the writer. A complete transcript of interviews with Daron Aric Hagen Michael Haithcockand Robert De Simone are included as appendices. In1961 the College Band Directors National Association (CBDNA) created its commissioning project for the purpose of contracting prominent composers to contribute works of high quality to the growing wind repertoire. Recently, CBDNA commissioned works that sought to collaborate with other disciplines within the artistic community. These collaborative works added new depth to the wind repertoire and helped advance the genre to new levels of prominence. CBDNA commissioned Daron Aric Hagen to write an opera using winds in the pit. He titled the work Bandanna, based on Shakespeare's Othello. Hagen contracted Paul Muldoon to write the libretto. A consortium of 79 member schools contributed to the project. A total of $100,000.00 was paid to the composer. The Director of Bands at Baylor University conducted the premiere performance of Bandanna during the 1999 CBDNA convention on 25 February 1999. Hagen assigned instrumental, thematic and harmonic attributes to each character. There are literally thousands of interactions between these elements that weave a tight pattern of organic unity into the entire work, making it exceptionally rich with symbolism and innuendo. Though still in its infancy, the uniqueness of this work both in the manner in which it came into being and through its artistic merits are fascinating. Only the future will determine whether Bandanna has true longevity or will fade into the background as a historical curiosity.
Date: December 2002
Creator: Powell, Edwin C.

Carl Gottlieb Reissiger (1798-1859) Forgotten Composer for the Clarinet

Description: Carl Gottlieb Reissiger was a successful German composer, conductor, and teacher in the first half of the nineteenth century. At the height of his career, he was Hofkapellmeister of theater and opera in Dresden, a position he held until his death. He was a composer of more than 200 works in a multitude of different genres. Today he is mainly known as a composer of opera, a small portion of his total output as a composer. He wrote approximately eighty piano solos, eighty collections of songs or duets, nine masses, and many smaller sacred choral works, as well as 27 piano trios, seven piano quartets, and three piano quintets. In addition to these many works, he wrote five works for the clarinet: Concertino, op. 63, Duo Brillant for clarinet and piano, op. 130, Fantasie, op. 146, Second Fantasie, op. 180, and Adagio und Rondo alla polacca, op. 214. This document provides a biographical sketch of Reissiger, including his personal life, his life as a conductor, and his life as a composer. It also provides a look at the artistic life of his day: his fellow composers and the music they were writing for clarinet, outstanding clarinetists and the different instruments they were playing. The aim of this study is to provide a stylistic analysis of Reissiger's five works for clarinet, including a discussion of form, melody, harmony, and rhythm. This document puts forth the proposal that these works are worth resurrecting and that Reissiger, as a composer of clarinet music, is more than just a secondary composer.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Coltman, Charles Arthur

"Ch'io t'abbandono" by Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: A Dramatic Image of the Education and Aptitudes of the Composer

Description: The unpublished concert aria, "Ch'io t'abbandono," by Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1825), is representative of the adolescent composer's developing musical aesthetic. In this study, Mendelssohn's education, work ethic, and perfectionism are revealed, paradoxically, as both the catalysts for the piece's composition and also the reasons it was not published during Mendelssohn's lifetime. An exploration of the text, form, thematic usage, and performance demands of the aria yields specific examples of his uniquely balanced romantic-classicist style. A consideration of possible original performers of the piece, Franz Hauser and Eduard Devrient, leads to further discussion about the nature of the work as both a reflection of Mendelssohn's romantic self-expression and his appreciation for the Baroque melismatic style. The significance of the aria, both stylistic and biographical, is further delineated by a presentation of possible motivations for its composition. The musical setting of the text, as well as the text itself, indicates both Mendelssohn's awareness of himself as a maturing adolescent composer and his desire to be a composer of operatic works, a desire that was never fully realized.
Date: August 2002
Creator: Turley, Charles William

The Contributions of Armenian Composers to the Clarinet Repertoire: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works, A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Khachaturian, Bax, Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Lutoslawski, Nielsen, Burgmüller, and Others

Description: With the exception of the music of Aram Khachaturian, the output of Armenian composers has been largely overlooked. This small Middle-Eastern country with a population of almost four million and an intriguing history indeed has a rich musical heritage. From its roots in sacred music and folksong, Armenian music has evolved into a unique blend of national elements and Western art music. Although it remains largely undiscovered, there is an entire repertoire of works in this aesthetic. The Trio for clarinet, violin, and piano by Khachaturian has long been a standard in the clarinetist's repertoire. This project brings to light lesser-known works of other Armenian composers. After providing a brief history of Armenia and her music (Chapter 2), this document presents an annotated bibliography of works using the clarinet (Chapter 3). Because there are a significant number of Armenians living outside their homeland, composers considered for this bibliography include all those of Armenian descent: those born,schooled, and presently living in Armenia, as well as those born to one or both Armenian parents residing in other countries. The bibliography includes works for unaccompanied clarinet, clarinet and piano, clarinet and orchestra, and chamber music for up to seven players. Each annotation includes the composer's name, dates, title of the work and its movements, date of composition, instrumentation, publisher and date of publication (in the case of published works), source from which the score can be obtained (in the case of unpublished works and works that are no longer published), duration of the work, and any recordings that are commercially available. Specific information about each piece, such as its dedication, first performance, historical background, musical characteristics, and performance practice issues is provided when available.
Date: December 2002
Creator: Wolverton, Cynthia Kay

The Contributions of Thomas G. Everett to Bass Trombone Repertoire, Literature, and Research.

Description: Thomas G. Everett's activities as a catalyst for bass trombone repertoire and scholarship are significant in the development of further research in the field, and in the development of new performance repertoire. An examination of Everett's life and musical influences precedes the detailing of his pursuits of new solo/chamber music for the bass trombone. A discussion of Everett's efforts in obtaining new performance repertoire by means of commission or request is followed by an examination of four pieces composed for Everett. The four pieces profiled are Sonata Breve by Walter Hartley, Prelude, Fugue, and Big Apple by Walter Ross, Everett Suite by Ulysses Kay, and 100 Bars for Tom Everett by András Szöllösy. Three of these four pieces, the Hartley, Ross, and Kay selections, are the repertoire for the performance recital portion of this research. Everett's contributions in the area of publication, including details of his Annotated Guide to Bass Trombone Literature are addressed as well as his role as founder of the International Trombone Association (ITA) and the implications of this organization's existence upon the growth of knowledge in the area of trombone pedagogy and performance. Two appendices account for the pieces in which Everett was involved in bringing to the repertoire. A third appendix is an annotated bibliography of Everett's trombone-related periodical publications.
Date: August 2002
Creator: Gassler, Christopher J.

Gustav Mahler's Kindertotenlieder: Subject and Textual Choices and Alterations of the Friedrich Rückert Poems, A Lecture Recital Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of F. Schubert, J. Offenbach, G. Finzi, and F. Mendelssohn

Description: The bulk of scholarly research and discussion of Mahler's Kindertotenlieder deals with musical concerns and analyses. This study explores the significance of Mahler's selection and use of the poetry of Friedrich Rückert and, in particular, the personal significance of the textual treatment to Mahler. A comparison of the original Rückert text with Mahler's and his textual alterations, as well as a literal translation of the text, is included. The results revealed through the process stated above provides the vocal performer of Gustav Mahler's Kindertotenlieder with a study and performance guide for the artist intent on a more complete textual understanding and delivery.
Date: August 2002
Creator: Rushing, Randal

The Influence Of Jazz On Timbre In Selected Compositions For Solo Trombone

Description: A significant body of solo literature for the trombone has been written in the last fifty years that draws as much from the jazz tradition as from that of European classical music. While much attention has been paid to these works' use of characteristic jazz rhythms, harmonies and melodic inflections, there has been little focus on timbre, the musical element that perhaps most readily distinguishes jazz from other styles of Western music. This paper focuses on the important role jazz timbres should play in a performer's interpretation of those works that are significantly influenced by jazz. It includes explorations of the significant differences in concepts of timbre between European classical music and jazz, some of the ways in which these timbral differences are produced, and methods by which performers can develop the skills necessary to produce these varied timbres. Particular attention is paid to the importance of timbre to idiomatically appropriate performances of two significant works from the solo trombone repertoire, Robert Suderburg's Night Set (Chamber Music III) and Richard Peaslee's Arrows of Time.
Date: December 2002
Creator: Aldag, Daniel J.

The influence of klezmer on twentieth-century solo and chamber concert music for clarinet: with three recitals of selected works of Manevich, Debussy, Horovitz, Milhaud, Martino, Mozart and others.

Description: The secular music of the Eastern European Jews is known today as klezmer. Klezmer was the traditional instrumental celebratory music of Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi Jews who eventually populated the Pale of Settlement, which encompassed modern-day Poland, Lithuania, Ukraine, Belarus and Romania. Due to the rise of oppression and expulsion, many klezmer musicians or klezmorim immigrated to the United States between 1880 and the early 1920s. These musicians found work in klezmer bands and orchestras as well as Yiddish radio and theater. Some of the most influential klezmorim were clarinetists Naftule Brandwein and Dave Tarras who helped develop an American klezmer style. While the American style flourished, the popularity of pure klezmer began to diminish. As American-born Jews began to prefer the new sounds of big band and jazz, klezmer was considered old-fashioned and was in danger of becoming a lost art form. During the early 1970s, a reawakening study of klezmer developed. Henry Sapoznik, Lev Liberman and Andy Statman were instrumental in creating a klezmer revival in the United States. At the same time, Argentinean-born Israeli clarinetist Giora Feidman was popularizing klezmer in Europe. Klezmer had again become popular and the revival's impact on the concert hall was inevitable. Even though klezmer has existed for centuries, composers have only recently included klezmer elements in their concert works. Characteristic modes (Freygish and Misheberakh), forms (freylekhs and doinas), instrumentation, and rhythms all contribute to create a unique style. Three musical works for clarinet are examined in the dissertation: Simeon Bellison's Four Hebrew Melodies in form of a suite, Simon Sargon's KlezMuzik and David Schiff's Divertimento from Gimpel the Fool. Although the compositions reveal different approaches to the elements, the klezmer influence is evident in each of them. An appendix of clarinet klezmer influenced concert works is included.
Date: December 2002
Creator: Card, Patricia Pierce

The Influence of Selma Meerbaum-Eisinger's Death on Xaver Paul Thoma's Composition of Ich bin in Sehnsucht Eingehüllt: Sieben Lieder für Sopran und Klavier, A Lecture Recital Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of O. Messiaen, G.F. Handel, A. Scarlatti, J.S. Bach, W. Latham, and Others

Description: The aim of this study is to introduce the contemporary German composer, Xaver Paul Thoma, and his composition, Ich bin in Sehnsucht Eingehüllt on the poems of Selma Meerbaum-Eisinger. This study explores the possible reasons behind Thoma's decision to set the poems, as well as the circumstances and significance of the poets' life and poetry, made known through Thoma's composition. An analysis of each song is included, emphasizing especially the relationship between text and music.
Date: August 2002
Creator: Rushing, JemmiLou Rye

Michael Daugherty's Red Cape Tango: A Comparative Study of the Original Version for Symphony Orchestra and its Transcription for Wind Orchestra, with Four Recitals of Selected Works by Beethoven, Dvorák, Verdi, Bartók and Daugherty

Description: Michael Daugherty has created his niche in the music world by composing works inspired by icons of American popular culture. Red Cape Tango is the final movement of his Metropolis Symphony, a work inspired by the life and times of the comic book character Superman. This movement in particular deals with the death of the superhero through the use of musical elements, most notably the Latin Sequence of the Mass for the Dead, Dies irae. Daugherty's ingenuity in blending profoundly dark subjects with humor is particularly evident in this work. Death is personified as a temptress and lures Superman through the power of a seductive tango. This study concentrates on Daugherty's compositional style and its impact in musical circles. A transcription for wind orchestra was created by another composer/conductor precisely because of the need to bring such an important work to another medium, thus making it accessible to a wider audience. In addition, this study looks at the changes in instrumentation necessary to create a second, equally formidable version of the work.
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Date: May 2002
Creator: Ortega, Arturo

Music for Solo Bassoon and Bassoon Quartet by Pulitzer Prize Winners: A Guide to Performance

Description: The Pulitzer Prize in Music has been associated with excellence in American composition since 1943, when it first honored William Schuman for his Secular Cantata No. 2: A Free Song. In the years that followed, this award has recognized America's most eminent composers, placing many of their works in the standard orchestral, chamber and solo repertoire. Aaron Copland, Samuel Barber, Walter Piston and Elliott Carter are but a few of the composers who have been honored by this most prestigious award. Several of these Pulitzer Prize-winning composers have made significant contributions to the solo and chamber music repertories of the bassoon, an instrument that had a limited repertoire until the beginning of the twentieth century. The purpose of this project is to draw attention to the fact that America's most honored composers have enlarged and enriched the repertoire of the solo bassoon and bassoon quartet. The works that will be discussed in this document include: Quartettino for Four Bassoons (1939) - William Schuman, Three Inventions for Solo Bassoon (1962) - George Perle, Canzonetta (1962) - John Harbison, Metamorphoses for Bassoon Solo (1991) - Leslie Bassett and “How like pellucid statues, Daddy. Or like a . . . an engine” (1994) - John Corigliano. Each chapter will include a brief biography of the composer, a historical perspective of where that composition lies in relation to their other works, background information about the work, a formal analysis and suggestions for performance.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Worzbyt, Jason Walter

The Nineteenth Century Oboe Concertino: An Overview of its Structure with Two Performance Guides

Description: Music written for oboe and orchestra in the nineteenth century falls into three categories: Classical Concerto, Opera Fantasy, and Concertino. The classical, or standard, three movement, sonata-ritornello format was only sparingly used. Instead, composers chose more the experimental forms of the Opera Fantasy and Concertino. The Opera Fantasy was used as a way for oboe players to play popular opera arias of the time, while showcasing their virtuosity and expression. It is in the Concertino where composers expanded the oboe repertoire to its highest form in the nineteenth century, experimenting with structure, and using the oboe to the height of its expressive powers. In addition to discussion on the Concertino in general, performance guides have been provided for two concertinos, Concertino for Oboe and Winds, by Carl Maria von Weber and Concertino for Oboe and Orchestra, Op. 18, by August Klughardt. Information is provided regarding composer biography, compositional/historical perspective, technical and stylistic considerations, and structure. By examining the two very different pieces, one from the beginning of the nineteenth century and one from the end, the evolution of the Concertino can be seen, as well as gaining an understanding of the wide variety of repertoire written for the oboe in the nineteenth century.
Date: August 2002
Creator: Murray, Lauren Baker

A Performance Guide to Tomas Svoboda's Duo Concerto for Trumpet and Organ, Op. 152

Description: The Duo Concerto Trumpet and Organ, Op.152 by Tomas Svoboda was written in memory of and commissioned by the friends of the late Richard Thornburg, second trumpet of the Oregon Symphony. Through the use of primary sources, Tomas Svoboda, composer and organist at the premiere, and Fred Sautter, principal trumpet of the Oregon Symphony and trumpeter at the premiere, the performance guide illuminates the piece with a discussion of five different topics. Chapter 2 of the guide reveals the circumstances of the commission and the initial compositional process. Chapter 3 discusses the performance history of the concerto, including the premiere. Chapter 4 provides analytical insights with programmatic titles accompanying the formal layout of the piece. Chapter 5 presents the piece from the standpoint of performance preparation. Chapter 6 concludes the guide with final thoughts of the composer, Tomas Svoboda. The guide provides the performer studying this piece the historical context of the concerto and highlights programmatic elements of the piece not apparent in its published form.
Date: August 2002
Creator: Murray, Robert

Performing the Trumpet works of Donald Erb; A Guide to Preparation, Interpretation and Practices: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Purcell, Hindemith, Holmes, Friedman, Koetsier and Others

Description: This study is a guide to the performer on practices associated with the trumpet music of Donald Erb. It examines the following solo and duo compositions for trumpet: the as yet unpublished Sonatina for Trumpet and Piano (1954); Four Duets for Trumpets (1960); Diversion for Two for trumpet & percussion (1966); Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra (1980); Remembrances for two trumpets (1994); and Dance, You Monster, To My Soft Song for solo trumpet (1998). A history of each composition and information concerning the performers who premiered them are documented. An examination of particular harmonic, melodic and rhythmic elements found frequently in these pieces follow. The pieces are further assessed for difficulty through an investigation of extended technical demands, range, endurance and articulation. Additional discussion focuses on the use of mutes, tempos and dynamics as well as suggestions for the preparation and performance of these works. The dissertation concludes with a review of Donald Erb's legacy as a composer and teacher. A comprehensive discography and complete list of Mr. Erb's compositions are included in appendices.
Date: August 2002
Creator: Spencer, David W.

Peter Lieberson's First Piano Concerto: A Buddhist-inspired poetic vision realized through twelve-tone language, other contemporary compositional techniques, together with three recitals of works by Bach, Chopin, Mozart, Albéniz, Grieg, Ginastera and Paderecki

Description: The main objective of this document is to explore the life and spiritual convictions of composer Peter Lieberson, and the creation of his Piano Concerto. Lieberson is a sought after composer who has won many awards and commissions. His works have been premiered and performed by some of the best musical artists of the late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century, such as Peter Serkin, Emmanuel Ax, Yo-Yo Ma, and Pierre Boulez. This study is divided into six chapters. After the Introduction, a biographical summary of Peter Lieberson's life, his spiritual beliefs and compositional style is presented. Chapter II contains background information on the Piano Concerto, along with biographical sketches of Peter Serkin, for whom the work was written, and Seiji Ozawa, music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and conductor of both the premier performance and Serkin's recording of the piece. Chapter III is a selective survey of the compositional techniques used in Lieberson's Concerto, in terms of the application of twelve-tone theory and the resulting octatonic, pentatonic, and whole-tone scales. Chapter IV introduces a general overview of the influence of Buddhism as a source of inspiration in the Piano Concerto. Chapter V examines aspects of performance practice issues. Chapter VI provides conclusions. The aim of this study is to further establish Peter Lieberson's stature as an important modern American composer. It is hoped that this study will encourage further research and interest in his works.
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Date: August 2002
Creator: Méndez-Flanigan, Maria Gisela

The Piano as an Orchestra: The Accompanist and the Twentieth-Century Orchestral Reduction

Description: The musical developments of the 20th century have expanded the role of the accompanist. As the compositional output of our time increases, and the opportunity to perform as soloist with an orchestra diminishes, piano reductions of an orchestral score are becoming the most frequent vehicle for concerto performances of twentieth and twenty-first century instrumental literature. While the current state of research provides solid support to many accompanists, it is in the area of instrumental accompanying, especially with regard to the challenges of playing a reduction of an orchestral score with an instrumental soloist, that the lack of discourse becomes strikingly evident. It is the goal of this study to provide the instrumental accompanist with concrete, practical approaches and considerations in order to perform an orchestral reduction in a manner consistent with the integrity of the score. Problems such as identifying the represented orchestral instruments, delineating importance of musical lines, and basic uses and misuses of pedal, articulation, and rubato are discussed. The pianist is led through ways of deciphering and negotiating specific passages, in order to guide the accompanist through the possible pitfalls and challenges unique to many orchestral reductions. By focusing on twentieth century reductions, providing examples of problems and discussing ways to solve them, the pianist will able to apply these to any reduction encountered, not just those specifically illustrated here. These basic principles of discerning common problems and appropriately reconciling them are then applied in a more advanced form to Robert Nelson's Concertino for Baritone Saxophone (1996). Through commentary from the composer, and a comparison of the orchestral score to the reduced piano score, the accompanist will explore detailed techniques of performing this work in a manner that upholds the original “orchestral” intent of the music.
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Date: August 2002
Creator: Lington, Victoria DiMaggio

The Solo Compositions for Trumpet of Fisher Aubrey Tull: An Analysis of Structural, Technical, and Stylistic Elements for Performance Preparation, with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Bozza, Fasch, Haydn, Tomasi, and Others

Description: The compositions of Fisher Aubrey Tull are widely performed and many have become standard repertoire. Tull's compositions encompass a multiplicity of performance media including works for orchestra, chorus, symphonic band, jazz band, brass choir, and solo and chamber works. Tull's compositional output for the trumpet is prolific and is acknowledged to be music of high quality. An examination of Trumpet and Brass Programs, compiled and published annually by the International Trumpet Guild, shows Tull's solo and ensemble works for trumpet to be frequently performed. Furthermore, his compositions for trumpet have been performed and recorded by internationally acclaimed artists including Vincent DiMartino, Terry Everson, Håkan Hardenberger, Anthony Plog, Carl "Doc" Severinsen and Allen Vizzutti.This study investigates Fisher Tull's eight solo works for trumpet, which include: Vignette for Trumpet and Piano (1954); Concerto No. 1 for Trumpet and Orchestra (1964); Concerto No. 2 for Trumpet and Band (1974); Three Bagatelles for Trumpet and Piano (1975); Eight Profiles for Solo Trumpet (1978); Rhapsody for Trumpet and Band (1980); Sonata for Trumpet and Piano (1986); and Chromutations for Solo Trumpet (1988). Histories of each composition are chronicled. An analysis of formal organization and significant style features examines musical structure, harmonic language, rhythmic character, instrumentation, and orchestration. A discussion of technical concerns specific to the trumpet that addresses range, tessitura, articulation, flexibility, endurance and the use of extended techniques is included. Performance suggestions, pertaining to technical and artistic issues, offer the reader specific recommendations as an aid in performance preparation. Finally, the significance of Fisher Tull's works for trumpet and his impact on the trumpet literature is assessed. Evidence suggests that his prolific compositional output, diversity of forms, and musical quality rank him as one of the most significant composers for the trumpet in the twentieth century.
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Date: August 2002
Creator: Wenger, Alan J.

Sonata for Piano (1963) by Sergei Michailovich Slonimsky: Musical Analysis and Discussion on Interpretation and Performance

Description: The essay begins with the overview of Russian-Soviet piano music from the second half of the 19th century to the end of the 20th century. Then, biographical information about Sergei Slonimsky and an overview of his major compositions is provided. The majority of the paper focuses on Slonimsky's Sonata for Piano (1963). A brief discussion of the Sonata's compositional history is followed by the formal analysis of the overall structure of the work. Slonimsky's original principle of organization of the music is emphasized: the system of constant interrelation of the main thematic material combined with elements of the sonata-allegro form. In the analysis of the harmonic language of the piece, the composer's extensive use of Russian folk elements such as diatonic melodies, sigh motives, parallel triads, and simultaneous use of the lower third with the major triad is pointed out. The rest of the paper focuses on issues of interpretation and performance. Special notice is given to the problem of incorporating a percussive type of playing with the elements of folk cantilena singing. The paper concludes with the history of Sonata's performances and a discussion of current recordings.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Fitenko, Nikita

A theoretical analysis of selected solo repertoire for saxophone by Paul Bonneau.

Description: The primary purpose of this dissertation is to provide greater insight into the compositional design of Paul Bonneau's Caprice en forme de valse solo pour saxophone and the Piece Concertante Dans L'Esprit "Jazz" pour saxophone alto et piano through a detailed analysis of the pieces. Paul Bonneau's Caprice en forme de valse is a major work for saxophone. It has been referred to as one of the most technically demanding works in the classical saxophone repertoire. In addition, the Caprice has been transcribed for the flute, clarinet and bassoon. In fact, the Caprice has been designated as "one of the most musically cohesive unaccompanied works written for any wind instrument." Bonneau's Piece Concertante Dans L'Esprit "Jazz" is also an important work in the repertoire due to its high degree of virtuosity and unique fusion of traditional classical and jazz elements. The analysis process focuses initially on the fundamental elements of music. Each analysis begins with an outline and description of the formal design of the piece. Major sections and their various subdivisions are detailed specifically. The tonal organization of the piece is presented. Large scale tonal areas are identified along with detailed discussions pertaining to specific harmonic structures. Due to the nature of the harmonic content of the pieces, standard contemporary chord symbol nomenclature is used. A table detailing various chord types and their associated symbols is provided. Information regarding the character and construction of Bonneau's melodies is presented. Items pertaining to melody include the use of step progressions, the variation principle, canonic effects and sequence. Basic rhythmic characteristics are outlined, as well. In addition to items related to the harmonic, melodic and rhythmic organization of pitches, other aspects of the music such as texture, articulation, dynamics and tessitura are integrated into the analytical discussion. Specific comments regarding the application ...
Date: August 2002
Creator: Johnson, Keith T.

The Tone Clock: Peter Schat's System and an Application to His Etudes for Piano and Orchestra, Opus 39

Description: The scope of this study includes relevant background information on Peter Schat and his compositions and process, an explanation of the Tone Clock system and a detailed analysis of one of his compositions, the Etudes for Piano and Orchestra, Opus 39. The intent is to demonstrate how the Tone Clock naturally evolved from the practices of the Second Viennese School and how it relates to both new and existing modern music. The study is divided into five chapters. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction to Peter Schat and the Tone Clock. Chapter 2 provides a more detailed biography of Peter Schat and traces the development and evolution of his compositional techniques, ultimately culminating in the Tone Clock. Chapter 3 provides a basic explanation of the Tone Clock itself, with demonstrations of various components through musical examples and illustrations. Chapter 4 is a detailed analysis of the Etudes for Piano and Orchestra, Opus. 39. Chapter 5 summarizes the results of the study, with special attention to the impact of the Tone Clock on performance from the perspective of the performer. The analysis of the Etudes was completed by using the Tone Clock as an analytical tool, aided by the composer's original manuscript and sketches for the work. The goal of the study is to establish the value of the Tone Clock as both a compositional and analytical tool.
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Date: December 2002
Creator: Petrella, Diane Helfers