UNT Libraries - 8 Matching Results

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Depression, Anxiety, Self-Esteem, and Coping in Children and Adolescents Newly Diagnosed with Cancer and Children and Adolescents on Cancer Treatment for a Period of Seven Months or Longer

Description: Differences in self-reported depression, anxiety, self-esteem, and coping were evaluated in two groups of pediatric oncology patients: newly diagnosed (less than six months post-diagnosis) (n=5) and patients on cancer treatment for seven months or longer (n=5). Participants (6 males, 4 females, ages 7-17 years) completed the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC), and the Culture-Free Self-Esteem Inventory (CFSEI-2); nine of the ten participants discussed in a semi-structured interview their personal experiences and feelings about having cancer. Although the newly diagnosed group had a higher mean score on the CDI than the 7 months or greater group, the difference was not significant (p = .054). The newly diagnosed group also had higher mean state and trait anxiety scores on the STAIC, indicating higher anxiety levels, and a slightly lower CFSEI-2 mean score, indicating slightly lower self-esteem than the 7 months or greater group, but differences were not at a statistically significant level (p>.05).
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Date: May 2000
Creator: Jones, Tracy L.

The Effect of Attachment on Preschooler's Emotion Understanding

Description: The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between attachment and emotion understanding in preschoolers. Data was collected from 16 preschool children and their mothers recruited from a private learning center in a downtown metropolitan area. Attachment was measured by use of the Attachment Q-sort, 3.0 (Waters, 1995), while emotion understanding was assessed through use of Denham's (1986) affective perspective-taking task and interviews of children concerning naturally occurring emotions and emotion causes (Fabes et al., 1991). Results included a significant correlation (p < .05) between secure attachment and preschooler's ability to decipher the cause of another's emotion; however, a significant correlation was not found between secure attachment and preschooler's perspective-taking ability or ability to name other's emotions. Thus, conclusions about the impact of attachment upon emotion understanding were mixed, and more research on the subject was implicated.
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Date: December 2000
Creator: Hernandez, Jennie R.

Hospitalized School-Age Children: Psychosocial Issues and Use of a Live, Closed-Circuit Television Program

Description: This descriptive study utilized semi-structured interviews and observations to examine the experiences of hospitalized school-age children, and explore the potential of a live, closed-circuit television program as a psychosocial intervention. Among findings, Phase I data from 16 subjects indicates a) concern with painful medical procedures, particularly intraveneous (IV) injections, b) a desire for more information, especially concerning medical equipment, c) a variety of responses to social issues among subjects, d) the importance of activities, and e) the central role of the hospital playroom. Phase II data indicates that live, closed-circuit television can provide ambulatory and room-bound children opportunities for making choices, social interaction, participation, and information on their environment. Conclusions and implications are included.
Date: August 1993
Creator: Ravert, Russell D. (Russell Douglas)

Linking Parent Relationships with Intimacy in a Selected Group of Young Adult University Students

Description: Literature suggests positive relationships with caregivers during childhood facilitate intimacy in young adulthood. The three hypotheses in this inquiry related to the students' relationship between parental intimacy and friend intimacy, gender differences in intimacy, and the perceived acceptance of parents. Subjects were 322 male and female university students, aged 17 through 25 years. Most were single, white, and middle class. During class the Children's Report of Parental Behavior, the Miller Social Intimacy Scale, and a demographic sheet were administered. ANOVA revealed that relationships between parental intimacy and friend intimacy were not significant. Females reported greater intimacy with friends than males. For both sexes, correlations between recalled parental intimacy and acceptance were higher for mothers than fathers.
Date: August 1991
Creator: Roland, Sandra Dodson

Reflections on the Development of Children of Alcoholics

Description: The specific purpose of this study was to try and understand why unique experiences of living with an alcoholic parent could create developmental deficits which emotionally challenge COAs' when faced with the life lessons a college environment offers. This study offered four possible explanations for experiencing challenges in its theoretical background: (1) psychosocial development, (2) the epistemology of alcoholism and its effects on the family, (3) personality development and the concurrence of building resilience, and (4) the college environment itself, with the phenomenon of binge drinking--forcing COAs to confront family alcoholism. A total of 7 participated in this study--4 men and 3 women. Despite the dynamic differences in the answers overall, all 7 participants acknowledged one important concept. When the participants were asked about their own drinking habits, each participant said, though in different ways, they had to be careful with their drinking habits. Participants seemed to be aware that whether alcoholism is genetic or a learned addiction, they were at risk of becoming alcoholics themselves. This study found overall, as previous literature suggests, no matter how COAs are studied, they are found to be a heterogeneous population. Specifically, this study's results points out that they are indeed heterogeneous, yet similar in that all participants in this study, it could be argued, exhibit some vulnerability in regard to parental alcoholism.
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Date: May 2001
Creator: Weise, Molly Amanda

The Relationship Between Sociometric Status of Preschool Children and Parenting Styles

Description: The purpose of the project was to examine the relationship between the social development of preschool children and parenting styles. Preschool social development was accessed by the use of sociometry. Parenting styles of mothers and fathers were determined by a questionnaire. The parenting styles and the sociometric status of the children were analyzed to determine a relationship using the chi-square analysis. The analysis indicated that there was no significant relationship between parenting styles and the sociometric status of preschool children. It is recommended that more research be done in the fields of parenting styles and sociometry.
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Date: August 2002
Creator: Evans, Irene Denise

The Relationship between Work-Family Role Strain and Parenting Styles in Mothers of Young Children

Description: The relationship between work-family role strain and parenting styles (permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative) was examined. Questionnaires were completed by 45 mothers whose children (ages newborn to three years) were enrolled in early childhood centers in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Denton, Texas, area. Participants were primarily Caucasian, high-income mothers who had attended college. Results indicated no significant relationship between role strain and parenting styles. Open-ended questions revealed insights into mothers' reported role strain. This research may provide employers and professionals who work with families with information to assist mothers in reducing role strain. They may also recognize that parenting style may be independent of a successful balance of work and family.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Lucas, Kimber Ghormley

The Relationship of Chinese Malaysian Maternal Child Rearing Practices and Preschool Children's Empathy

Description: The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between Malaysian maternal child-rearing practices and preschool children's empathic behavior. This study additionally investigated the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and child-rearing practices, as well as explored whether gender differences exist in preschool children's empathy.
Date: December 1994
Creator: Lee, Yit-Fong