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An NMR study of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium and of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium/lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide mixed aggregates

Description: A 1H, 13C, and 6Li NMR study of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium indicated that 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium exists only as a hexameric aggregate over the entire temperature range of 25 to - 92.1 ° C in cyclopentane. Reacting 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium with 2-ethyl-1-butanol resulted in alkyllithium/lithium alkoxide mixed aggregates, apparently of the form Ra(RO)bLia+b. A multinuclear, variable temperature NMR study of samples with O:Li ratios of 0.2 and 0.4 showed, in addition to the alkyllithium, the formation of four mixed aggregates, one of them probably an octamer. Higher O:Li ratio samples showed the formation of several other mixed aggregates. Mixing 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium with independently prepared lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide formed the same mixed aggregates formed by in situ synthesis of lithium alkoxide. Lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide also exists as aggregates in cyclopentane.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Ferreira, Aluisio V. C.

Computational Studies of Selected Ruthenium Catalysis Reactions.

Description: Computational techniques were employed to investigate pathways that would improve the properties and characteristics of transition metal (i.e., ruthenium) catalysts, and to explore their mechanisms. The studied catalytic pathways are particularly relevant to catalytic hydroarylation of olefins. These processes involved the +2 to +3 oxidation of ruthenium and its effect on ruthenium-carbon bond strengths, carbon-hydrogen bond activation by 1,2-addition/reductive elimination pathways appropriate to catalytic hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and the possible intermediacy of highly coordinatively unsaturated (e.g., 14-electron) ruthenium complexes in catalysis. The calculations indicate a significant decrease in the Ru-CH3 homolytic bond dissociation enthalpy for the oxidation of TpRu(CO)(NCMe)(Me) to its RuIII cation through both reactant destabilization and product stabilization. This oxidation can thus lead to the olefin polymerization observed by Gunnoe and coworkers, since weak RuIII-C bonds would afford quick access to alkyl radical species. Calculations support the experimental proposal of a mechanism for catalytic hydrogen/deuterium exchange by a RuII-OH catalyst. Furthermore, calculational investigations reveal a probable pathway for the activation of C-H bonds that involves phosphine loss, 1,2-addition to the Ru-OH bond and then reversal of these steps with deuterium to incorporate it into the substrate. The presented results offer the indication for the net addition of aromatic C-H bonds across a RuII-OH bond in a process that although thermodynamically unfavorable is kinetically accessible. Calculations support experimental proposals as to the possibility of binding of weakly coordinating ligands such as dinitrogen, methylene chloride and fluorobenzene to the "14-electron" complex [(PCP)Ru(CO)]+ in preference to the formation of agostic Ru-H-C interactions. Reactions of [(PCP)Ru(CO)(1-ClCH2Cl)][BAr'4] with N2CHPh or phenylacetylene yielded conversions that are exothermic to both terminal carbenes and vinylidenes, respectively, and then bridging isomers of these by C-C bond formation resulting from insertion into the Ru-Cipso bond of the phenyl ring of PCP. The QM/MM and DFT calculations on full complexes ...
Date: December 2007
Creator: Barakat, Khaldoon A.

Diphosphine Ligand Activation Studies with Organotransition-Metal Compounds

Description: Thermolysis of CoRu(CO)7(m -PPh2) (1) in refluxing 1,2-dichloroethane in the presence of the diphosphine ligands 2,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)maleic anhydride (bma) and 4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (bpcd) furnishes the new mixed-metal complexes CoRu(CO)4(μ -P-P)(μ -PPh2) [where P-P = bma (3); bpcd (6)], along with trace amounts of the known complex CoRu(CO)6(PPh3)(μ -PPh2) (4). The requisite pentacarbonyl intermediates CoRu(CO)5(μ -P-P)(μ -PPh2) [where P-P = bma (2); bpcd (5)] have been prepared by separate routes and studied for their conversion to CoRu(CO)4(μ -P-P)(μ -PPh2). The complexes 2/3 and 5/6 have been isolated and fully characterized in solution by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The kinetics for the conversion of 2→3 and of 5→6 were measured by IR spectroscopy in chlorobenzene solvent. On the basis of the first-order rate constants, CO inhibition, and the activation parameters, a mechanism involving dissociative CO loss as the rate-limiting step is proposed. The solid-state structure of CoRu(CO)4(μ -bma)(μ -PPh2) (3) reveals that the two PPh2 groups are bound to the ruthenium center while the maleic anhydride π bond is coordinated to the cobalt atom. Thermolysis of the cluster Ru3(CO)12 with the bis(phosphine)hydrazine ligand (MeO)2PN(Me)N(Me)P(OMe)2 (dmpdmh) in toluene at 75°C furnishes the known clusters Ru4(CO)12[μ -N(Me)N(Me)] (9) and Ru3(CO)11[P(OMe)3] (10), in addition to the new cluster Ru3(CO)10(dmpdmh) (8) and the phosphite-tethered cluster Ru3(CO)9[μ -P(OMe)3] (11). The simple substitution product Ru3(CO)10(dmpdmh), a logical intermediate to clusters 9-11, was synthesized by treating Ru3(CO)12 and dmpdmh with Me3NO in CH2Cl2 at room temperature, and independent thermolysis reactions using cluster 8 were shown to yield clusters 9-11. The tetrahedrane cluster FeCo2(CO)9(μ3-S) reacts with the redox-active ligand 4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (bpcd) to give the disubstituted cluster FeCo2(CO)7(bpcd)(μ3-S) as the sole product. This diphosphine-substituted cluster contains a cobalt-bound, chelating bpcd ligand. The solid-state structure has been unequivocally established by X-ray diffraction analysis. Cyclic voltammetric studies on FeCo2(CO)7(bpcd)(μ3-S) reveal the presence of two quasireversible ...
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Date: December 2000
Creator: Wang, Jiancheng

Diffusion Barriers/Adhesion Promoters. Surface and Interfacial Studies of Copper and Copper-Aluminum Alloys

Description: The focus of this research is to study the interaction between copper and the diffusion barrier/adhesion promoter. The behavior of copper sputter-deposited onto sputter-cleaned tantalum nitride is investigated. The data show that copper growth on tantalum nitride proceeds with the formation of 3-D islands, indicating poor adhesion characteristics between copper and Ta0.4N. Post-annealing experiments indicate that copper will diffuse into Ta0.4N at 800 K. Although the data suggests that Ta0.4N is effective in preventing copper diffusion, copper's inability to wet Ta0.4N will render this barrier ineffective. The interaction of copper with oxidized tantalum silicon nitride (O/TaSiN) is characterized. The data indicate that initial copper depositions result in the formation a conformal ionic layer followed by Cu(0) formation in subsequent depositions. Post-deposition annealing experiments performed indicate that although diffusion does not occur for temperatures less than 800 K, copper "de-wetting" occurs for temperatures above 500 K. These results indicate that in conditions where the substrate has been oxidized facile de-wetting of copper may occur. The behavior of a sputter-deposited Cu0.6Al0.4 film with SiO2 (Cu0.6Al0.4/SiO2) is investigated. The data indicate that aluminum segregates to the SiO2 interface and becomes oxidized. For copper coverages less than ~ 0.31 ML (based on a Cu/O atomic ratio), only Cu(I) formation is observed. At higher coverages, Cu(0) is observed. These data are in contrast with the observed behavior of copper metal deposited onto SiO2 (Cu/SiO2). The data for Cu/SiO2 show that copper does not wet SiO2 and forms 3-D nuclei. Furthermore, post-annealing experiments performed on Cu0.6Al0.4/SiO2 show that neither de-wetting nor diffusion of copper occurs for temperatures up to 800 K, while Cu diffusion into SiO2 occurs ~ 600 K. These data indicate that aluminum alloyed with copper at the SiO2 interface serves as an effective adhesion promoter and thermal diffusion barrier.
Date: August 2000
Creator: Shepherd, Krupanand Solomon

The Performance of Silicon Based Sensor and its Application in Silver Toxicity Studies

Description: The silicon based sensor is able to detect part per trillion ionic silver in 0.0098% hydrofluoric acid based on the open circuit potential (OCP) measurement. The OCP jump of 100 ppt ionic silver solution is up to 120 mV. The complex agent can effectively suppress the ionic silver concentration and suppress the OCP signal. The ability of complex agent to suppress the OCP signal depends on the formation constant of the complex with silver. The complex adsorbed on the sensor surface induces a second OCP jump, the height of the second jump depends on the formation constant of the complex. The MINEQL chemical equilibrium modeling program is used to calculate the ionic silver concentration when complex agent presents, a discrepancy is found between the MINEQL simulation result and the OCP signal of the silicon based sensor. The toxicity of ionic silver to C. dubia is studied parallel to the OCP signal of silicon based sensor. Less toxicity is found when the complex agent is present similar to the OCP signal. Another discrepancy is found between the MINEQL simulation and the toxicity test when MINEQL simulation is used to predict and control the ionic silver concentration. The data from both biosensor C. dubia and silicon based sensor support each other and both are not in agreement with MINEQL simulation prediction.
Date: August 2000
Creator: Peng, Haiqing

Synthesis and host-guest interaction of cage-annulated podands, crown ethers, cryptands, cavitands and non-cage-annulated cryptands.

Description: Symmetrical cage-annulated podands were synthesized via highly efficient synthetic strategies. Mechanisms to account for the key reaction steps in the syntheses are proposed; the proposed mechanisms receive support from the intermediates that have been isolated and characterized. An unusual complexation-promoted elimination reaction was studied, and a mechanism is proposed to account for the course of this reaction. This unusual elimination may generalized to other rigid systems and thus may extend our understanding of the role played by the host molecules in "cation-capture, anion-activation" via complexation with guest molecules. Thus, host-guest interaction serves not only to activate the anion but also may activate the leaving groups that participate in the complexation. Complexation-promoted elimination provides a convenient method to desymmetrize the cage while avoiding protection/deprotection steps. In addition, it offers a convenient method to prepare a chiral cage spacer by introducing 10 chiral centers into the host system in a single synthetic step. Cage-annulated monocyclic hosts that contain a cage-butylenoxy spacer were synthesized. Comparison of their metal ion complexation behavior as revealed by the results of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), alkali metal picrate extraction, and pseudohydroxide extraction with those displayed by the corresponding hosts that contain cage-ethylenoxy or cage-propylenoxy spacers reveals the effect of the length of the cage spacer upon the host-guest behavior. A series of cage-annulated cryptands, cavitands and the corresponding non-cage-annulated model compounds have been synthesized. These host molecules display unusual behavior when examined by using ESI-MS techniques, i.e., they bind selectively to smaller alkali metal ions (i.e., Li+ and Na+), a result that deviates significantly from expectations based solely upon consideration of the size-fit principle. It seems likely that this behavior results from the effect of the host topology on host-guest behavior. A series of non-cage-annulated cryptands also have been synthesized. These compounds can serve as starting ...
Date: May 2003
Creator: Chen, Zhibing

Layered Double Hydroxides: Morphology, Interlayer Anion, and the Origins of Life

Description: The preparation of layered double hydroxides via co-precipitation of a divalent/trivalent metal solution against a base results in 1 mm LDH particles with a disorganized metal lattice. Research was performed to address these morphological issues using techniques such as Ostwald ripening and precipitation via aluminate. Another interesting issue in layered double hydroxide materials is the uptake and orientation of anions into the interlayer. Questions about iron cyanide interlayer anions have been posed. Fourier transform infared spectroscopy and powder x-ray diffraction have been used to investigate these topics. It was found that factors such as orientation, anion charge, and anion structure depended on the divalent/trivalent metal ratio of the hydroxide layer and reactivity time. The cyanide self-addition reaction is an important reaction of classical prebiotic chemistry. This reaction has been shown to give rise to amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. At cyanide concentrations similar to that expected on the early earth, hydrolysis to formamide rather than self-addition occurs. One theory to alleviate this side reaction is the use of minerals or clays that are thought to concentrate and catalyze prebiotics of interest. Layered double hydroxides have been studied as a catalyst for this reaction.
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Date: December 2002
Creator: Halcom-Yarberry, Faith Marie

Substituent Effects: A Computational Study on Stabilities of Cumulenes and Low Barrier Hydrogen Bonds

Description: The effect of substituents on the stabilities of cumulenes-ketenes, allenes, diazomethanes and isocyanates and related systems-alkynes, nitriles and nitrile oxides is studied using the density functional theory (B3LYP, SVWN and BP86) and ab initio (HF, MP2) calculations at the 6-31G* basis set level. Using isodesmic reactions, correlation between stabilization energies of cumulenes and substituent group electronegativities (c BE) is established and the results from DFT and MP2 methods are compared with the earlier HF calculations. Calculations revealed that the density functional methods can be used to study the effect of substituents on the stabilities of cumulenes. It is observed that the cumulenes are stabilized by electropositive substituent groups from s -electron donation and p -electron withdrawal and are destabilized by electronegative substituent groups from n-p donation. The calculated geometries of the cumulenes are compared with the available experimental data.High level ab initio and density functional theory calculations have been used to study the energetics of low-barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) systems. Using substituted formic acid-formate anion complexes as model LBHB systems, hydrogen bond strength is correlated to the pKa mismatch between the hydrogen bond donor and the hydrogen bond acceptor. LBHB model systems are characterized by the 1H-NMR chemical shift calculations. A linear correlation between the calculated hydrogen bond strength and the predicted 1H-NMR chemical shift was established. It is concluded that the pKa matching within the enzyme active site of the two species involved in the LBHB is important to maximizing catalytic stabilization.
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Date: August 2000
Creator: Kumar, Ganesh Angusamy

Mechanisms of Methoxide Ion Substitution and Acid- Catalyzed Z/E Isomerization of N-Methoxyimines

Description: The second order rate constants for nucleophilic substitution by methoxide of (Z)- and (E)-O-methylbenzohydroximoyl fluorides [C6H4C(F)=NOCH3] with various substituents on the phenyl ring [p-OCH3 (1h, 2h), p-CH3 (1g, 2g), p-Cl (1f, 2f), p-H (1e, 2e), (3,5)-bis-CF3 (1i, 2i)] in 90:10 DMSO:MeOH have been measured. A Hammett plot of these rate constants vs σ values gave positive ρ values of 2.95 (Z isomer) and 3.29 (E isomer). Comparison of these rates with methoxide substitution rates for Omethylbenzohydroximoyl bromide [C6H4C(Br)=NOCH3] and Omethylbenzohydroximoyl chloride [C6H4C(Cl)=NOCH3] reveal an element effect for the Z isomers of Br:Cl:F(1e) = 2.21:1.00:79.7 and for the E isomers of Cl:F(2e) = 1.00:18.3. With the p-OCH3-imidoyl halides the following element effects are found: Br:Cl:F(1h) = 2.78:1.00:73.1 for the Z isomer and Br:Cl:F(2h) = 1.97:1.00:12.1 for the E isomer. Measurement of activation parameters revealed ∆S≠ = -17 eu for 1e and ∆S≠ = -9.9 eu for 2e. Ab initio calculations (HF/6-31+G*, MP2/6-31+G*//HF/6-31+G*, B3LYP/6- 31+G*//HF/6-31+G*, HF-SCIPCM/6-31+G*//HF/6-31+G*) were performed to define the reaction surface. These calculations demonstrate a relatively large barrier for nucleophilic attack in relation to halogen loss and support the experimental findings that this reaction proceeds by an addition-elimination mechanism (AN# + DN). The imidoyl fluorides have been used to synthesize highly functionalized O-methyloximes by reaction with enolate anions derived from malononitrile, ethyl cyanoacetate, and diethyl malonate. Acid-catalyzed isomerization of compounds containing the O-methyloxime moiety have been investigated with ab initio calculations (HF/6-31+G*, MP2/6- 31+G*//HF/6-31+G*, B3LYP/6-31+G*//HF/6-31+G*). Barriers for rotation around the C-N bond following protonation have been calculated. The calculated barriers are discussed in relation to an isomerization mechanism of protonation-rotation versus a nucleophilic catalysis.
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Date: December 2001
Creator: Dolliver, Debra D.

A Computational Study on 18+δ Organometallics

Description: The B3LYP density functional has been used to calculate properties of organometallic complexes of Co(CO)3 and ReBr(CO)3, with the chelating ligand 2,3-bisphosphinomaleic anhydride, in 19- and 18-electron forms. The SBKJC-21G effective core potential and associated basis set was used for metals (Co/Re) and the 6-31G* basis set was used for all other elements. The differences of bond angles, bond distances, natural atomic charges and IR vibrational frequencies were compared with the available experimental parameters. The differences between the 19- and 18-electron systems have been analyzed. The results reveal that the 19th electron is mostly distributed over the ligand of 2,3-bisphosphinomaleic anhydride, although partially localized onto the metal fragment in 1 and 2*. Two different methods, IR-frequencies and natural atomic charges, were used to determine the value of δ. Present computed values of δ are compared with available experimental values, and predictions are made for unknown complexes.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Yu, Liwen

Kinetic studies and computational modeling of atomic chlorine reactions in the gas phase.

Description: The gas phase reactions of atomic chlorine with hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, benzene, and ethylene are investigated using the laser flash photolysis / resonance fluorescence experimental technique. In addition, the kinetics of the reverse processes for the latter two elementary reactions are also studied experimentally. The absolute rate constants for these processes are measured over a wide range of conditions, and the results offer new accurate information about the reactivity and thermochemistry of these systems. The temperature dependences of these reactions are interpreted via the Arrhenius equation, which yields significantly negative activation energies for the reaction of the chlorine atom and hydrogen sulfide as well as for that between the phenyl radical and hydrogen chloride. Positive activation energies which are smaller than the overall endothermicity are measured for the reactions between atomic chlorine with ammonia and ethylene, which suggests that the reverse processes for these reactions also possess negative activation energies. The enthalpies of formation of the phenyl and β-chlorovinyl are assessed via the third-law method. The stability and reactivity of each reaction system is further rationalized based on potential energy surfaces, computed with high-level ab initio quantum mechanical methods and refined through the inclusion of effects which arise from the special theory of relativity. Large amounts of spin-contamination are found to result in inaccurate computed thermochemistry for the phenyl and ethyl radicals. A reformulation of the computational approach to incorporate spin-restricted reference wavefunctions yields computed thermochemistry in good accord with experiment. The computed potential energy surfaces rationalize the observed negative temperature dependences in terms of a chemical activation mechanism, and the possibility that an energized adduct may contribute to product formation is investigated via RRKM theory.
Date: August 2009
Creator: Alecu, Ionut M.

Kinetic Studies of Hydroxyl and Hydrogen Atom Reactions

Description: Gas phase kinetics of the reactions involving hydroxyl radical and hydrogen atom were studied using experimental and ab initio theoretical techniques. The rate constant for the H + H2S reaction has been measured from 298 to 598 K by the laser photolysis/resonance fluorescence (LP-RF) technique. The transition state theory (TST) analysis coupled with the measurements support the suggestion that the reaction shows significant curvature in the Arrhenius plot. The LP-RF technique was also used to measure the rate constant of the H + CH3Br reaction over the temperature range 400-813 K. TST and density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the dominant reaction channel is Br-abstraction. The reaction H + CF2=CF-CF=CF2 was first studied by flash photolysis/resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) method. The experiments of this work revealed distinctly non-Arrhenius behavior, which was interpreted in terms of a change in mechanism. DFT calculations suggest that the adduct is CF2H-CF•-CF=CF2. At lower temperatures a mixture of this molecule and CF2•-CFH-CF=CF2 is likely. The theoretical calculations show that H atom migrates in the fluoroethyl radicals through a bridging intermediate, and the barrier height for this process is lower in the less fluorinated ethyl radical. High level computations were also employed in studies of the rate constants of OH + chloroethylenes reactions. VTST calculations indicate that, except the reaction of OH + C2Cl4, these reactions present a complex behavior. For OH + C2Cl4, conventional TST calculation shows a simple positive temperature-dependence behavior.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Hu, Xiaohua

Investigation of the Pressure Dependence of SO3 Formation

Description: The kinetics of the pressure dependent O + SO2 + Ar reaction have been investigated using laser photolysis resonance fluorescence at temperatures of 289 K, 399 K, 581 K, 699 K, 842 K and 1040 K and at pressures from 30-665 torr. Falloff was observed for the first time in the pressure dependence. Application of Lindemann theory yielded an Arrhenius expression of k(T) = 3.3 x 10-32exp(-992/T) cm6 molecule-1 s-1 for the low pressure limit and k(T) = 8.47 x 10-14exp(-468/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for the high pressure limit at temperatures between 289 and 842 K. The reaction is unusual as it possesses a positive activation energy at low temperature, yet at higher temperatures the activation energy is negative, illustrating a reaction barrier.
Date: December 2003
Creator: Naidoo, Jacinth

Investigations of Thermochemistry and the Kinetics of H Atom Radical Reactions

Description: The thermochemistry of several species, and the kinetics of various H atom radical reactions relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry were investigated using ab initio theoretical techniques and the flash photolysis / resonance fluorescence technique. Using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations up to the G3 level of theory, the C-H bond strengths of several alkanes were calculated. The bond strengths were calculated using two working reactions. From the results, it is apparent that the bond strengths decrease as methyl groups are added to the central carbon. The results are in good agreement with recent experimental halogenation kinetic studies. Hydrogen bond strengths with sulfur and oxygen were studied via CCSD(T) theory, together with extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. The results for the bond dissociation energies (ground state at 0 K, units: kJ mol-1) are: S-H = 349.9, S-D = 354.7, HS-H = 376.2, DS-D = 383.4, and HO-H = 492.6. These data compare well with experimental literature. The rate constants for the isotopic reactions of H + H2S, D + H2S, H + D2S, and D + D2S are studied at the QCISD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p) level of theory. The contributions of the exchange reaction versus abstraction are examined through transition state theory. The energy of NS was computed via CCSD(T) theory, together with extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. The results were employed with three working reactions to find ΔfH0(NS) = 277.3 ± 2 kJ mol-1 and ΔfH298(NS) = 278.0 ± 2 kJ mol-1. This thermochemistry is consistent with, but much more precise than, earlier literature values. A kinetic study of the reaction of H + CH2CCl2 was conducted over the temperature range of 298 - 680 K. The reaction was found to be pressure dependent and results of the rate constants and their interpretation via unimolecular rate theory are ...
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Date: December 2002
Creator: Peebles, Lynda Renee

Electrochemical Deposition of Zinc-Nickel Alloys in Alkaline Solution for Increased Corrosion Resistance.

Description: The optimal conditions for deposition of zinc-nickel alloys onto stainless steel discs in alkaline solutions have been examined. In the past cadmium has been used because it shows good corrosion protection, but other methods are being examined due to the high toxicity and environmental threats posed by its use. Zinc has been found to provide good corrosion resistance, but the corrosion resistance is greatly increased when alloyed with nickel. The concentration of nickel in the deposit has long been a debated issue, but for basic solutions a nickel concentration of 8-15% appears optimal. However, deposition of zinc-nickel alloys from acidic solutions has average nickel concentrations of 12-15%. Alkaline conditions give a more uniform deposition layer, or better metal distribution, thereby a better corrosion resistance. Although TEA (triethanolamine) is most commonly used to complex the metals in solution, in this work I examined TEA along with other complexing agents. Although alkaline solutions have been examined, most research has been done in pH ≥ 12 solutions. However, there has been some work performed in the pH 9.3-9.5 range. This work examines different ligands in a pH 9.3-9.4 range. Direct potential plating and pulse potential plating methods are examined for optimal platings. The deposits were examined and characterized by XRD.
Date: December 2009
Creator: Conrad, Heidi A.

Synthesis of Crown Ether/Ammonium Salt for Electron Transfer Study

Description: The theoretical model of Beratan and Onuchic predicts a large attenuation of ET rates through hydrogen bonds; however, the effect of individual hydrogen bond on electron transfer reaction has not been systematically studied. The organic complexes in this study are a series of crown ether/ammonium salt, which incorporate a redox partner on each component of the complex. The dimethoxynaphthalene redox donor was attached to the crown ether and a series of ammonium salts was synthesized which bear substituted quinone and naphthoquinone acceptor. The complexes characterization and preliminary electron transfer rate measurement were completed with UV/Vis and steady-state emission spectroscopy.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Han, Dong

Fluorination Effect on the Conformational Properties of Alkanes

Description: A Series of fluorophores of the general formular P(CF2)nP and P(CF2)n-1CF3 has been synthesized. Copper catalyzed coupling of 1-bromopyrene and the corresponding mono and di-iodoperfluoroalkanes were used in most cases. For the n=3 dimer, a novel 1,w-perfluoroalkylation of pyrene via bis-decarboxylation of hexafluorogultaric acid was utilized. These compounds, along with suitable hydrocarbon analogs, are being used to study the flexibility of fluorocarbon chains using emission. We have found that the excimer formation for the fluorinated pyrene monomers is highly dependent on concentration and is less efficient than for pyene. Excimer formation for the fluorinated pyrene dimers is much more efficient than for the fluorocarbon monomers and is only slightly concentraion dependent. Steady-state emission spectra indicate hydrocarbon dimers-models form excimers more efficiently than the fluorinated dimers suggesting the fluorinated chains are stiffer than the hydrocarbons. We conducted the temperature-dependent studies and quantified the conformational difference.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Xu, Wenjian

Electrochemical synthesis of CeO2 and CeO2/montmorillonite nanocomposites.

Description: Nanocrystalline cerium oxide thin films on metal and semiconductor substrates have been fabricated with a novel electrodeposition approach - anodic oxidation. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that as-produced cerium oxide films are characteristic face-centered cubic fluorite structure with 5 ~ 20 nm crystal sizes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study probes the non-stoichiometry property of as-produced films. Raman spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy have been applied to analyze the films as well. Deposition mode, current density, reaction temperature and pH have also been investigated and the deposition condition has been optimized for preferred oriented film formation: galvanostatic deposition with current density of -0.06 mA/cm2, T > 50oC and 7 < pH < 10. Generally, potentiostatic deposition results in random structured cerium oxide films. Sintering of potentiostatic deposited cerium oxide films leads to crystal growth and reach nearly full density at 1100oC. It is demonstrated that in-air heating favors the 1:2 stoichiometry of CeO2. Nanocrystalline cerium oxide powders (4 ~ 10 nm) have been produced with anodic electrochemical synthesis. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were employed to investigate lattice expansion phenomenon related to the nanoscale cerium oxide particles. The pH of reaction solution plays an important role in electrochemical synthesis of cerium oxide films and powder. Cyclic voltammetry and rotation disk electrode voltammetry have been used to study the reaction mechanisms. The results indicate that the film deposition and powder formation follow different reaction schemes. Ce(III)-L complexation is a reversible process, Ce3+ at medium basic pH region (7~10) is electrochemically oxidized to and then CeO2 film is deposited on the substrate. CE mechanism is suggested to be involved in the formation of films, free Ce3+ species is coordinated with OH- at high basic pH region (>10) to Ce2O3 immediately prior to electrochemically oxidation Ce2O3 to CeO2. CeO2 / montmorillonite nanocomposites were electrochemically produced. X-ray ...
Date: December 2003
Creator: Wang, Qi

Metallization and Modification of Low-k Dielectric Materials

Description: Aluminum was deposited onto both Teflon AF and Parylene AF surfaces by chemical vapor deposition of trimethylaluminum. This work shows that similar thin film (100 Angstroms) aluminum oxide adlayers form on both polymers at the low temperature dosing conditions used in the studies. Upon anneal to room temperature and above, defluorination of the polymer surfaces increased and resulted in fluorinated aluminum oxide adlayers; the adlayers were thermally stable to the highest temperatures tested (600 K). Angle-resolved spectra showed higher levels of fluorination toward the polymer/adlayer interface region. Copper films were also deposited at low temperature onto Teflon AF using a copper hexafluoroacetylacetonate-cyclooctadiene precursor. Annealing up to 600 K resulted in the loss of precursor ligands and a shift to metallic copper. As with aluminum adlayers, some polymer defluorination and resulting metal (copper) fluoride was detected. Parylene AF and polystyrene films surfaces were modified by directly dosing with water vapor passed across a hot tungsten filament. Oxygen incorporation into polystyrene occurred exclusively at aromatic carbon sites, whereas oxygen incorporation into parylene occurred in both aromatic and aliphatic sites. Oxygen x-ray photoelectron spectra of the modified polymers were comparable, indicating that similar reactions occurred. The surface oxygenation of parylene allowed enhanced reactivity toward aluminum chemical vapor deposition. Silicon-carbon (Si-Cx) films were formed by electron beam bombardment of trimethylvinylsilane films which were adsorbed onto metal substrates at low temperatures in ultra-high vacuum. Oxygen was also added to the films by coadsorbing water before electron beam bombardment; the films were stable to more than 700 K, with increasing silicon-oxygen bond formation at elevated temperatures. Copper metal was sputter deposited in small increments onto non-oxygenated films. X-ray photoelectric spectra show three-dimensional copper growth (rather than layer-by-layer growth), indicating only weak interaction between the copper and underlying films. Annealing at elevated temperatures caused coalescence or growth ...
Date: December 2008
Creator: Martini, David M.

Reducing the Computational Cost of Ab Initio Methods

Description: In recent years, advances in computer technology combined with new ab initio computational methods have allowed for dramatic improvement in the prediction of energetic properties. Unfortunately, even with these advances, the extensive computational cost, in terms of computer time, memory, and disk space of the sophisticated methods required to achieve chemical accuracy - defined as 1 kcal/mol from reliable experimental data effectively - limits the size of molecules [i.e. less than 10-15 non-hydrogen atoms] that can be studied. Several schemes were explored to help reduce the computational cost while still maintaining chemical accuracy. Specifically, a study was performed to assess the accuracy of ccCA to compute atomization energies, ionization potentials, electron affinities, proton affinities, and enthalpies of formation for third-row (Ga-Kr) containing molecules. Next, truncation of the correlation consistent basis sets for the hydrogen atom was examined as a possible means to reduce the computational cost of ab initio methods. It was determined that energetic properties could be extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit utilizing a series of truncated hydrogen basis sets that was within 1 kcal/mol of the extrapolation of the full correlation consistent basis sets. Basis set truncation for the hydrogen atom was then applied to ccCA in the development of two reduced basis set composite methods, ccCA(aug) and ccCA(TB). The effects that the ccCA(aug) and ccCA(TB) methods had upon enthalpies of formation and the overall percent disk space saved as compared to ccCA was examined for the hydrogen containing molecules of the G2/97 test suite. Additionally, the Weizmann-n (Wn) methods were utilized to compute the several properties for the alkali metal hydroxides as well as the ground and excited states of the alkali monoxides anion and radicals. Finally, a multi-reference variation to the correlation consistent Composite Approach [MR-ccCA] was presented and utilized in the computation ...
Date: August 2008
Creator: Mintz, Benjamin

Synthesis, characterization, and kinetics of isomerization, C-H and P-C bond activation for unsaturated diphosphine-coordinated triosmium carbonyl clusters.

Description: Substitution of MeCN ligands in the activated cluster Os3(CO)10(MeCN)2 by the unsaturated diphosphine ligands (Z)-Ph2PCH=CHPPh2 (cDPPEn) or 4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (bpcd) proceeds rapidly at room temperature to furnish the ligand-bridged cluster 1,2-Os3(CO)10(P-P) (P-P represents cDPPEn or bpcd). Heating 1,2-Os3(CO)10(P-P) leads to the formation of the thermodynamically more stable chelating isomer 1,1-Os3(CO)10(P-P). Each compound of Os3(CO)10(P-P) has been characterized by x-ray diffraction, IR, 31P NMR and 1H NMR. Ligand isomerization kinetics have been investigated by UV-VIS and 31P NMR (for cDPPEn) or 1H NMR (for bpcd) spectroscopies. The isomerization mechanism is discussed based on the activation parameters and CO inhibition (for cDPPEn) or ligand trapping experiments (for bpcd). Thermolysis of 1,1-Os3(CO)10(bpcd) in refluxing toluene gives the hydrido cluster HOs3(CO)9[μ-(PPh2)C=C{PPh(C6H4)}C(O)CH2C(O)] and the benzyne cluster HOs3(CO)8(μ3-C6H4)[μ2,η1-PPhC=C(PPh2)C(O)CH2C(O)]. Photolysis of 1,1-Os3(CO)10(bpcd) using near UV light affords HOs3(CO)9[μ-(PPh2)C=C{PPh(C6H4)}C(O)CH2C(O)] as the sole product. HOs3(CO)8(μ3-C6H4)[μ2,η1-PPhC=C(PPh2)C(O)CH2C(O)] has been characterized in solution by IR and NMR spectroscopies. Furthermore its molecular structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Reversible C-H bond formation in HOs3(CO)9[μ-(PPh2)C=C{PPh(C6H4)}C(O)CH2C(O)] is demonstrated by ligand trapping studies to give 1,1-Os3(CO)9L(bpcd) (where L = CO, phosphine) via the unsaturated intermediate 1,1-Os3(CO)9(bpcd). The kinetics for reductive coupling in HOs3(CO)9[γ-(PPh2)C=C{PPh(C6H4)}C(O)CH2C(O)] and DOs3(CO)9[μ-(PPh2-d10)C=C{P(Ph-d5)(C6D4)}C(O)CH2C(O)] in the presence of PPh3 give rise to a kH/kD value of 0.88, whose magnitude supports the existence of a preequilibrium involving the hydride(deuteride) cluster and a transient arene-bound Os3 species that precedes the rate-limiting formation of 1,1-Os3(CO)9(bpcd). Strong proof for the proposed hydride(deuteride)/arene preequilibrium has been obtained from photochemical studies employing the isotopically labeled cluster 1,1-Os3(CO)10(bpcd-d4ortho), whose bpcd phenyl groups each contain one ortho hydrogen and deuterium atom. Equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects in the orthometallation step has been determined by 1H NMR in photochemical studies. Kinetics for the transformation from HOs3(CO)9[μ-(PPh2)C=C{PPh(C6H4)}C(O)CH2C(O)] to HOs3(CO)8(μ3-C6H4)[μ2,η1-PPhC=C(PPh2)C(O)CH2C(O)] has been studied by UV-VIS spectroscopy for which the mechanism is discussed.
Date: May 2008
Creator: Wu, Guanmin

Thermochemical Study of Crystalline Solutes Dissolved in Ternary Hydrogen-Bonding Solvent Mixtures

Description: The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the thermochemical properties of nonelectrolyte solutes dissolved in ternary solvent mixtures, and to develop mathematical expressions for predicting and describing behavior in the solvent mixtures. Forty-five ternary solvent systems were studied containing an ether (Methyl tert-butyl ether, Dibutyl ether, or 1,4-Dioxane), an alcohol (1-Propanol, 2-Propanol, 1-Butanol, 2-Butanol, or 2-Methyl-1-propanol), and an alkane (Cyclohexane, Heptane, or 2,2,4-Trimethylpentane) cosolvents. The Combined NIBS (Nearly Ideal Binary Solvent)/Redlich-Kister equation was used to assess the experimental data. The average percent deviation between predicted and observed values was less than ± 2 per cent error, documenting that this model provides a fairly accurate description of the observed solubility behavior. In addition, Mobile Order theory, the Kretschmer-Wiebe model, and the Mecke-Kempter model were extended to ternary solvent mixtures containing an alcohol (or an alkoxyalcohol) and alkane cosolvents. Expressions derived from Mobile Order theory predicted the experimental mole fraction solubility of anthracene in ternary alcohol + alkane + alkane mixtures to within ± 5.8%, in ternary alcohol + alcohol + alkane mixtures to within ± 4.0%, and in ternary alcohol + alcohol + alcohol mixtures to within ± 3.6%. In comparison, expressions derived from the Kretschmer-Wiebe model and the Mecke-Kempter model predicted the anthracene solubility in ternary alcohol + alkane + alkane mixtures to within ± 8.2% and ± 8.8%, respectively. The Kretschmer-Wiebe model and the Mecke-Kempter model could not be extended easily to systems containing two or more alcohol cosolvents.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Pribyla, Karen J.

Layered Double Hydroxides and the Origins of Life on Earth

Description: A brief introduction to the current state of research in the Origins of Life field is given in Part I of this work. Part II covers original research performed by the author and co-workers. Layered Double Hydroxide (LDH) systems are anion-exchanging clays that have the general formula M(II)xM(III)(OH)(2x+2)Y, where M(II) and M(III) are any divalent and trivalent metals, respectively. Y can be nearly any anion, although modern naturally occuring LDH systems incorporate carbonate (CO32-), chloride (Cl-), or sulfate (SO42-) anions. Intercalated cobalticyanide anion shows a small yet observable deviation from local Oh symmetry causing small differences between its oriented and non-oriented infrared spectra. Nitroprusside is shown to intercalate into 2:1 Mg:Al LDH with decomposition to form intercalated ferrocyanide and nitrosyl groups of an unidentified nature. The [Ru(CN)6]4- anion is shown to intercalate into layered double hydroxides in the same manner as other hexacyano anions, such as ferrocyanide and cobalticyanide, with its three-fold rotational axis perpendicular to the hydroxide sheets. The square-planar tetracyano-nickelate(II), -palladate(II), and platinate(II) anions were intercalated into both 2:1 and 3:1 Mg:Al layered double hydroxides (LDH). The basal spacings in the 2:1 hosts are approximately 11 Å, indicating that the anions are inclined approximately 75 degrees relative to the hydroxide layers, while in the 3:1 hosts the square-planar anions have enough space to lie more nearly parallel to the LDH cation layers, giving basal spacings of approximately 8 Å. It has been found that the LDH Mg2Al(OH)6Cl catalyzes the self-addition of cyanide, to give in a one-pot reaction at low concentrations an increased yield of diaminomaleonitrile and in addition, at higher ($0.1M) concentrations, a purple-pink material that adheres to the LDH. We are investigating whether this reaction also occurs with hydrotalcite itself, what is the minimum effective concentration of cyanide, and what can be learned about the products ...
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Date: May 2001
Creator: Brister, Brian

Thermodynamics of Mobile Order Theory: Solubility and Partition Aspects

Description: The purpose of this thesis is to analyze the thermochemical properties of solutes in nonelectrolyte pure solvents and to develop mathematical expressions with the ability to describe and predict solution behavior using mobile order theory. Solubilities of pesticides (monuron, diuron, and hexachlorobenzene), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (biphenyl, acenaphthene, and phenanthrene), and the organometallic ferrocene were studied in a wide array of solvents. Mobile order theory predictive equations were derived and percent average absolute deviations between experimental and calculated mole fraction solubilities for each solute were as follows: monuron in 21 non-alcoholic solvents (48.4%), diuron in 28 non-alcoholic solvents (60.1%), hexachlorobenzene (210%), biphenyl (13.0%), acenaphthene (37.8%), phenanthrene (41.3%), and ferrocene (107.8%). Solute descriptors using the Abraham solvation model were also calculated for monuron and diuron. Coefficients in the general solvation equation were known for all the solvents and solute descriptors calculated using multilinear regression techniques.
Date: August 2004
Creator: De Fina, Karina M.