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The Effect of Federal Labor Legislation on Organizing Southern Labor During the New Deal Period

Description: With the aid of the labor legislation passed during the New Deal era, it would appear that southern labor should have been as well organized proportionately as northern labor. Outwardly it would also appear that southern labor did not enjoy more success in organization because it was still docile and preferred to bargain on an individual basis, an attitude which met with the approval of the southern employer. However, the attitude of the individual southern worker does not explain what occurred in the South under the New Deal. Rather, other important factors retarded unionization: southern community attitudes, regional hostility to anything northern, southern courts, the national aspect of the New Deal and the various unions themselves. To understand the slow but continuous process of unionization in the South during the New Deal period, these factors have to be considered in their setting. Only here can the effect of the New Deal labor legislation be readily discernible.
Date: August 1962
Creator: Forsythe, James Lee