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Woodrow Wilson in the Council of Four: A Re-Evaluation

Description: It was Woodrow Wilson who played the dominant role in the Council of Four. With his dedication to the vague, often contradictory Fourteen Points, and with the power of the office of President of the United States supporting him, he determined the very nature of the treaty. Wilson's use, and misuse, of his influence over his colleagues makes him responsible for much of the final form of the Treaty of Versailles.
Date: January 1965
Creator: Brown, Dora M.

A Study of the Anti-Catholic Bias Contained Within Jacob Burckhardt's The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy

Description: This work examines the anti-Catholic bias of Jacob Burckhardt as he employed it in the Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy. A biographical chapter examines his early education in the Lutheran seminary and the influence of his educators at the University of Berlin. The Civilization is examined in three critical areas: Burckhardt's treatment of the popes in his chapter "The State as a Work of Art," the reform tendencies of the Italian humanists which Burckhardt virtually ignored, and the rise of confraternities in Italy. In each instance, Burckhardt demonstrated a clear bias against the Catholic Church. Further study could reveal if this initial bias was perpetuated through later "Burckhardtian" historians.
Date: May 1996
Creator: Kistner, Michael P. (Michael Patrick)

Creating a Mythistory: Texas Historians in the Nineteenth Century

Description: Many historians have acknowledged the temptation to portray people as they see themselves and wish to be seen, blending history and ideology. The result is "mythistory." Twentieth century Texas writers and historians, remarking upon the exceptional durability of the Texas mythistory that emerged from the nineteenth century, have questioned its resistance to revision throughout the twentieth century. By placing the writing of Texas history within the context of American and European intellectual climates and history writing generally, from the close of the eighteenth century to the beginning of the twentieth, it is possible to identify a pattern that provides some insight into the popularity and persistence of Texas mythistory.
Date: August 1998
Creator: McLemore, Laura Lyons, 1950-

Populism and the Poll Tax: the Politics and Propaganda of Suffrage Restriction in North Texas, 1892-1904

Description: This thesis challenges the traditional interpretation of the history of Populism in America through the use of an intensive regional study. Using precinct-level returns, this thesis proves that, contrary to the conclusions of more general studies, voters from predominately Populist areas in North Texas did not support the poll tax amendment that passed in November 1902. The Populists within this region demonstrated their frustration and distrust of the political process by leaving the polls in higher percentages than other voters between 1896 and 1902. The Populists that did participate in 1902 reentered the Democratic Party but did not support the poll tax, which was a major plank within the Democratic platform. This thesis also proves that the poll tax had a significant effect in reducing the electorate in North Texas.
Date: December 1997
Creator: Carawan, James T. (James Terry)

Black Nationalism Reinterpreted

Description: Black nationalism responded to America's failure to examine the effects of slavery's legacy. Its aims represent those issues that were either unsupported by or in opposition to the goals of the civil rights leadership. In particular, the civil rights movement dismissed any claims that the history of slavery had a lasting effect on African-Americans. This conflict developed because of mainstream America's inability to realize that the black community is not monolithic and African-Americans were differentially affected by slavery's legacy. It is those blacks who are most affected by the culture of poverty created by America's history of slavery who make up today's inner-city populations. Despite successes by the civil rights movement, problems within lower-class black communities continue because the issues of the black underclass have not yet been fully addressed.
Date: May 1995
Creator: Largent, Mark Aaron

The Texas Presidencies : Presidential Leadership in the Republic of Texas, 1836-1845

Description: This thesis examines the letters, proclamations, and addresses of the four presidents of the Republic of Texas, David G. Burnet, Sam Houston, Mirabeau B. Lamar, and Anson Jones, to determine how these men faced the major crises of Texas and shaped policy regarding land, relations with Native Americans, finances, internal improvements, annexation by the United States, and foreign relations. Research materials include manuscript and published speeches and letters, diaries, and secondary materials.
Date: May 1998
Creator: Bridges, Kenneth William

Lucca in the Signoria of Paolo Guinigi, 1400-1430

Description: This study analyzes the once great medieval Tuscan capital of Lucca's struggle for survival at the beginning of the fifteenth century. This was the age of the rise of regional states in Italy, and the expansionistic aims of Milan, Florence and others were a constant challenge to city-states such as Lucca which desired a political and cultural status quo. Yet, it was a challenge that was successfully met; unlike Pisa, Siena, Perugia, and various other major Tuscan cities, Lucca did not succumb to Milanese or Florentine aggression in the early Quattrocento. Why it did not is a major topic of discussion here. One of the means in which the Lucchese faced the new political and military realities of the time was the establishment of a monarchial system of government in the signoria of Paolo Guinigi (r. 1400-1430). The Guinigi Signoria was not characterized by the use of intimidation and violence, but rather by clientage, kinship and neighborhood bonds, marriage alliances, and the general consent of the people. Paolo garnered the consent of the people at first because his wealth allowed him to protect Lucca and its contado to a greater extent than would have been possible otherwise, and because of his family's long ties with the powerful Visconti of Milan; he held it later because he provided the city-state with capable leadership. This study extends the evidence of recent scholars that every Italian Renaissance city was unique based on its particular geography, alliances, civic wealth, and a number of other factors. Lucca in the period of Paolo Guinigi, a monarchy in the setting of one of the traditionally most republican cities of Italy, provides a most interesting example. “Civic humanism,” for example, has a decidedly different slant in Lucca than elsewhere, and is best exemplified in the figure of Giovanni ...
Date: May 2002
Creator: Johnson, Ken

The Provincial Congress of North Carolina 1774-1776

Description: The Provincial Congress assumed the leadership of North Carolina at a time when, almost simultaneously, the seeds of the American Revolution were beginning to take root throughout the neighboring provinces. The task faced by that body was, therefore, not only one of reinstituting their own civil government, but also of providing for the protection of North Carolina and working, in union, for the defense of the entire continent.
Date: January 1970
Creator: McCarty, Jerry L.

America's Postwar Settlement : Dollar Diplomacy in Europe, 1919-1925

Description: Prosperity was the positive goal of America's postwar policy. For several years, the United States was successful in her attempt to be at the same time politically aloof and economically opportunistic. But politics and economics were radically intertwined in the reparation settlement, and when reparations interfered with the prosperity of the Atlantic community, it shattered as well America's resolve to "let Europe stew in her own juice," and caused American reinvolvement in European concerns. America's postwar settlement can be expressed in two words: disentanglement frustrated.
Date: January 1970
Creator: Naberhaus, William J.

The Papal Aggression: Creation of the Roman Catholic Hierarchy in England, 1850

Description: This thesis studies the Papal Aggression in England, which was the zealous reaction to a papal decree that had created territorial hierarchy for English Roman Catholics. The study seeks answers to the following questions: Why did the pope create the heirarchy? Why did the English people react so vehemently? Why did Lord John Russell write his Durham Letter? Why did the government fail to enforce the Ecclesiastical Titles Act? What light, if any, does this episode shed on the zeitgeist of the Victorian Age?
Date: January 1969
Creator: Paz, D.G. (Denis G.)

American Public Opinion During Crises in Japanese-American Relations in the Early Twentieth Century

Description: Throughout the period following Pearl Harbor, as one crisis in Japanese-American relations followed another, the American public opinion was divided. Some newspapers and personalities feared that there would be war over the San Francisco school board crisis, while others believed that talk of war was ridiculous. Partisan politics often affected the course of affairs on the Japanese question.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Nelson, Donald Fowler.

Russia and the Balkan Wars

Description: This thesis is a study and evaluation of Russian foreign policy in the Balkan Wars, 1912-13. Its primary purpose is to seek out and define the goals and aspirations of Russian diplomacy at this time and evaluate them in terms of success or failure.
Date: January 1969
Creator: Johnson, William Conley

The Hoare-Laval Plan and the Sanctions Crisis of 1935

Description: This study deals primarily with the efforts of Great Britain to bring the Italian-Ethiopian War to a halt through the Hoare-Laval peace plan of December 10, 1935. Based on memoirs, diaries, and public documents, this study is devoted to an examination of the reasons, both internal and external that formulated British foreign policy toward the war.
Date: May 1968
Creator: Stevens, John T.

Great Britain and the Russian Ukase of September 16, 1821

Description: The affair of the Ukase of September, 1821, evokes such questions as these: What was its real purpose? Was Alexander guilty of aggression in North America or was he only attempting to solve a domestic problem, viz., smuggling in the Alaskan colony? Why did George Canning negotiate separately with Russia after he had expressed a desire to cooperate with the United States? Did he really believe that Russia would be more impressed by separate negotiations, as Harold Temperley has suggested? Did the tsar deliberately appease Britain in the hope of securing her aid in a Russo- Turkish war, as S. B. Okun and Hector Chevigny have contended, or did he follow a policy of expediency?
Date: January 1970
Creator: Ward, Richard Allen

Lenin : Theorist and Politician

Description: This thesis is a study of Lenin and his ideas and actions during the first five months that he was political leader of Russia. Its primary purpose is to discover the particular relationships between theory and expediency as roles in influencing Lenin's actions as head of state for that period, hoping that a basic understanding of the mind of Vladimir I. Lenin will evolve.
Date: August 1967
Creator: Greenfield, Patsy J.

The Early Career of Daniel Finch, Second Earl of Nottingham, 1679-1693

Description: The purpose of this study is to present an account of the early career of Daniel Finch from 1679 to 1693. The investigation begins with an account of Finch's rise to prominence in parliament and at the Admiralty. It subsequently traces his role and involvement in the revolution settlement, and, after the accession of William III, Finch's responsibility as Secretary of State dealing principally with ecclesiastical affairs and naval affairs until his dismissal in 1693.
Date: August 1967
Creator: Kelley, James Nolan

The Missionary Work of Samuel A. Worcester Among the Cheroke, 1825-1840

Description: Worcester made two major contributions to the Cherokee before his death at Park Hill in 1859. First was his faith and the propagation of Christianity among them. However, this was done by other missionaries both before and after him. But his truly unique accomplishment was his work with the Cherokee language.
Date: August 1970
Creator: White, Jerran Burris