UNT Libraries - 12 Matching Results

Search Results

Effects of Water Quality, Instream Toxicity, and Habitat Variability on Fish Assemblages in the Trinity River, Texas

Description: The Trinity River flows through the Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex in north central Texas where it receives effluents from numerous point sources including seven large regional wastewater treatment facilities. Historically, the Trinity River has been impacted by massive wastewater loadings which often constitute > 80% of the total river discharge during low flow periods. Normally, high mass loadings correspond to the summer months, compounding the effects of a naturally stressful period, characterized by high temperatures and low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Samples from 12 stations were collected quarterly over an 18 month period from the Trinity River and two tributaries. Water samples were analyzed for a variety of water quality variables, including metals, priority pollutants, pesticides, and general water quality parameters. Water samples were also tested for acute and subchronic effects with several test species. Fish were collected at each station and assemblages were characterized using traditional classification techniques and the Index of Biotic Integrity. In addition, sediment samples were assessed for toxic effects which could have adversely impacted fish recruitment and in situ biomonitoring experiments were performed. Quantitative habitat characterization analyses were performed to gain additional information that could possibly explains differences in fish assemblage structure related to habitat variability. Data were analyzed using regression, univariate, multivariate, and descriptive statistical techniques and new approaches for analyzing impact assessment data were discussed. Results indicated that the most substantial impacts on fish assemblages were confined to a segment of the river where a sequence of point sources, in close proximity to each other, were overloading the river's capacity to sufficiently dilute and/or detoxify the effluent. Data also indicated the presence of episodic toxicity from nonpoint sources. In addition, toxic effects in sediment samples and differences in habitat were detected and may have contributed to measured differences among fish assemblages in the Trinity River.
Date: December 1989
Creator: Arnold, Winfred R., 1960-

Measurement of Feedback Inhibition In Vivo and Selection of ATCase Feedback Altered Mutants in Salmonella typhimurium

Description: Aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase; encoded by pyrBI genes) is one of the most studied regulatory enzymes in bacteria. It is feedback inhibited by cytidine triphosphate (CTP) and activated by adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Much is known about the catalytic site of the enzyme, not nearly as much about the regulatory site, to which CTP binds. Until now a positive selection for feedback-modified mutants was not available. The selection we have developed involves the use of a pyrA deletion in S. typhimurium. This strain lacks carbamoylphosphate and requires both a pyrimidine and arginine for growth. In this strain citrulline is used to satisfy the pyrimidine and arginine requirements. The minimal flow through the pyrimidine pathway from the citrulline-produced carbamoylphosphate is exquisitely sensitive to feedback control of ATCase by CTP. By elevating the CTP pool, via exogenous cytidine, in a strain that also contains a cytidine deaminase mutant (cdd) growth can be stopped completely, indicating 100% inhibition. It was therefore possible to measure in vivo feedback inhibition of ATCase among the citrulline users and to isolate a family of ATCase regulatory mutants with either modified or no response to effectors.
Date: August 1989
Creator: Bailey, Andrea J., 1952-

Pre-Impoundment Estimations of Nutrient Loading to Ray Roberts Lake and Prediction of Post-Inundation Trophic Status

Description: Excessive nutrient loading of natural and artificial lakes has led, in some systems, to plethoric algal and aquatic macrophyte growth which can result in aesthetic degradation and undesirable tastes and odors. It would be advantageous to have some indication of the potential trophic status of a reservoir before it is filled. An objective of this study was to assess the water quality and nutrient loading potential of the tributaries entering Ray Roberts Lake, a large reservoir located in north central Texas. Samples from a maximum of thirteen sites were collected on the Elm Fork, Trinity River, Isle duBois Creek, and five additional tributaries. Data were also collected during six storms, from atmospheric deposition collectors, and from soil-water microcosms. The relationship between watershed landuse and mean water nutrient concentrations was evaluated. Significant differences will exist between the two major arms of Ray Roberts Lake: Elm Fork, Trinity River and Isle duBois Creek. While the majority of the annual phosphorus and nitrogen load entering both tributaries is coming from overland flow, the proportion is higher in Isle duBois Creek. Point sources in the Elm Fork contribute a larger percentage of the bioavailable phosphorus, which is significantly greater than in Isle duBois Creek. The water quality of Isle duBois Creek, especially nitrogen, is affected to a greater degree by the landuses in its watershed. Predictive regression models made accurate estimations of stream nutrient concentrations in Isle duBois Creek. The entire reservoir, upon reaching equilibrium conditions, will be classified as a eutrophic lake. The Trinity arm, with a higher phosphorus load, will display a higher trophic status. The Isle duBois arm has a lower phosphorus load which will give it a lower trophic status. The long hydraulic residence time of the two arms of the reservoir will remove nutrients upstream of the main body, ...
Date: May 1988
Creator: Pillard, David Alan, 1958-

Interaction of Microwaves and Germinating Seeds

Description: This investigation was concerned with determining the interaction of microwaves with germinating seeds. This study covers two different approaches. The preliminary efforts covered the response of germinating seeds to treatment by microwaves and heat. The second phase of the investigation used microwaves as a probe to determine some of the processes of early seed germination. The preliminary investigation measured the internal metabolic process by ATP production. Leakage of ions and organic material from germinating seeds indicated that membranes are a target of microwaves and heat. Electron photo-micrographs showed an increase in damage to membranes as heat and microwave treatments were increased. The second phase of this investigation was concerned with determining some of the biological activity at the initiation of germination of wheat seeds, Triticum aestivum L., using a resonating microwave cavity oscillating at 9.3 GHz as a probe. Direct current conductivity measurements were also made on the seeds as a means of confirming the observations made with the microwave cavity. There was no observable difference between treatment by UHF or heat in the ultrastructure of germinating seeds. A dielectric response far above that of free water was found as live seeds of wheat began to imbibe water. This effect was assumed to be due to the release of ions, because conductivity increased as corresponding quantities of water were imbibed; and both conductivity and dielectric response decreased as imbibition progressed. Although dead seeds also imbibe water, they do not show this decrease in dielectric response. The dielectric response of live seeds was reduced after the initial imbibition, showing that water became tightly bound as imbibition progressed. The dielectric response of actively growing shoots from the seeds was much less than that of the seeds themselves. The large quantity of water in the shoots is assumed to be immobile, being tightly ...
Date: August 1987
Creator: Shafer, Floyd L. (Floyd Lorenz)

An Analysis of Respiratory Mechanisms Controlling Exercise Hyperpnea During Cycle Ergometry Conducted at Selected Workloads and Pedal Frequencies

Description: Respiratory and metabolic patterns in response to variations in exercise workload (WL) and pedal frequency (RPM) were examined in 10 healthy males. Each subject performed WLs of low (L), moderate (M) and high (H) intensity, equivalent to 25%, 50% and 75% V02 m a x at 7 pedal frequencies (40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 RPM). ANOVA ( 3 X 7 design) indicated that WL and RPM had independent and significant effects on all respiratory and metabolic measures; i.e., the greater the WL and RPM, the higher the HR, V02, VC02, Ve, Fb, Vt, Vt/Ti, Vt/Te and Ti/TtQt and the lower the Ti and Te. However, analysis of the interaction effect revealed different response patterns for Fb, Vt, Ti, Vt/Ti, Vt/Te and Ve among the WLs. During L-WL, increases in RPM produced increases in Ve which were due to progressive increases in both Fb and Vt. However, during M-WL and H-WL, increases in RPM produced increases in Ve which were accomplished by a constant Vt and a progressive increase in Fb. My findings suggest that during low WLs, the signal for Vt is dependent on rate of contraction, while during M-WL and H-WL, the signal for Vt appears to depend on force of contraction and is independent of increasing RPM. When comparing the L-WL and M-WL, alterations in Ve, Fb, Vt/Ti and Vt/Te in relation to increases in pedal frequency were additive. However, when these two lower WLs were compared to the H-WL, the interaction between pedal frequency and Ve, Fb, Vt/Ti and Vt/Te was multiplicative. In addition, the interaction between WL and RPM on Vt and Ti was additive when comparing the M-WL and H-WL and multiplicative when these two lower WLs were compared to the H-WL. Correlation analysis indicated that for all WLs, Te was more ...
Date: December 1986
Creator: Wise, Charles Hamilton

Roles of Calcium Ions and Cyclic AMP in Olfactory Transduction

Description: The roles of Ca2 + and cAMP in olfactory transduction were explored using agents which affect calcium channels and second messenger systems. These agents were applied at certain calculated final concentrations onto olfactory epithelia of urethane-anesthetized frogs (Sana PiPlens) by two-sec aerosol spray. During extracellular recording, saturated vapors of isoamyl acetate were delivered every 100 sec in 0.3 sec pulses to produce an electroolfactogram (EOG). Inorganic cations that block inward calcium currents inhibit EOG responses with the following rank order: (La3+) > (Zn2+, Cd2+) > (Al3+, Ca2+, Sr2+) > (Co2+). Application of 7.5 mM La3+ eradicates £0G's, while Ba2+ (which can carry more current that Ca2+) initially produces significant enhancement (F=43.04, p<0.001, df=19). Magnesium ion has no effect on EOG's at 7.5 mM, while 1.5 X 10"4M Ca2+ is significantly inhibitory (F=5.74; p=0.0355; df=12). Control aerosol sprays of distilled water depress EOG's by an average of 5%. The organic calcium channel antagonists diltiazem and verapamil inhibit EOG's by 17% and 36X, respectively, at a concentration of 1.5 X 10~*M. Verapamil produces significant inhibition (F=17.17; p=0.002; df=ll) at 1.5 X 10" 5 M, while the 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists, nicardipine and nifedipine, do not inhibit beyond 1% DMSO controls. Several calmodulin antagonists decrease EOG's, but without correlation to their anti-calmodulin potency. Application of 1.5 X 10"*M chlorpromazine and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-l-naphthalenesulfonamide inhibit EOG's by 31% and 27%, respectively, while trifluoperazine inhibits by 23%. Dibutyryl cAMP, a lipophilic mimic of cAMP, produces 54% inhibition at 1.5 X 10" *M. Dibutyryl cGMP, cGMP, cAMP, and adenosine all decrease EOG's by less than 15% compared to distilled water controls. Forskolin, a reversible activator of adenylate cyclase, inhibits EOG's by 57% at 1.5 X 10"5M, which is significant beyond the 1% DMSO controls (F=17.17; p=0.002; df=ll). These data support the hypothesis that Ca2+ participates in olfactory transduction. ...
Date: December 1986
Creator: Winegar, Bruce D. (Bruce David)

The Eosinophil and Lysophospholipase Responses in Mice Infected with Trichinella spiralis: A Role for the Lymphocyte and Macrophage

Description: The relationship among eosinophils, lysophospholipase activity and the immune response in animals infected with Trichinella spiralis was studied using in vivo and in vitro techniques. In an in vivo experiment, anti-thymocyte serum (ATS) was administered to mice infected with T. spiralis and its effects on intestinal lysophospholipase (EC 3.1.1.5.) activity, peripheral blood, bone marrow and intestinal eosinophilia were measured in the same experimental animal. The ATS caused a significant temporally related suppression of both the tissue lysophospholipase response and eosinophilia, in all three compartments. These findings support the hypothesis that parasite-induced eosinophilia is the cause of the increased lysophospholipase activity of parasitized tissue and that the responses are thymus cell-dependent. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the eosinophil was the primary inflammatory cell source of lysophospholipase among eosinophils, neutrophils macrophages and lymphocytes. The role of other cells and antigen in the production of the enzyme by the eosinophil was also investigated in vitro• Results demonstrated that eosinophils cultured with both T. spiralis antigen and other leukocytes yielded enzyme activities significantly greater than eosinophils cultured alone or with only antigen. More specific experiments showed that T-lymphocytes were the cells responsible for influencing the eosinophils' lysophospholipase activity in the presence of antigen, and that their influence was enhanced by the presence of macrophages. These results suggested that increased lysophospholipase activity present in parasitized tissue was not only due to increased numbers of eosinophils infiltrating parasitized tissue but was also due to each eosinophil synthesizing more of the enzyme. The necessity for antigen and other cells suggests a role for cell cooperation in the production of the enzyme, specifically T-lymphocytes and macrophage interaction with the eosinophil. A lymphocyte soluble factor collected from sensitized lymphocytes stimulated with specific antigen or concanavalin A was found to enhance the eosinophil lysophospholipase activity when added to cultures of ...
Date: August 1986
Creator: Adewusi, Iyabode Olukemi, 1958-

The Genetics of Pigmentation in Corynebacterium poinsettiae ATCC 9682

Description: Corynebacterium poinsettiae mutant strains blocked in carotenoid biosynthesis were obtained by treatment with the mutagen N-methyl-N1-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Additional carotenoid (Crt) mutant strains were obtained from a previous study conducted in our laboratory. Fifty-nine Crt mutants affected in carotenoid biosynthesis were examined by a normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. Pigment extracts of Crt mutants and C. poinsettiae wild type strains were resolved by an isocratic system with hexane:acetone:dicholoromethane, 11.35:1.73:1.00 (by vol.) as the eluting solvent. In addition to the five major peaks, twelve minor peaks were observed in the wild type C. poinsettiae strain used in this study. Crt mutant and wild type strain peak heights were measured from the individual chromatograms and the peak height data set created was analyzed using the Statistical Analysis System program to perform a cluster analysis. The cluster analysis revealed five carotenoid mutant groups. Carotenoid pigments which accumulated or were absent in each of the cluster groups are reported. Cluster group 1 mutants (CrtA) are blocked in the dehydrogenase(s) which is(are) responsible for the dehydrogenations between phytoene and lycopene. Cluster group 2 mutants (CrtB) appear to be blocked at a second dehydrogenase specific for the dehydrogenation from C.p. 470 to C.p. 496. Cluster group 3 mutants (CrtC) are blocked at a cyclization step in the pathway which involves cyclization of C.p. 496 to C.p. 470 and which may cyclize C.p. 473 to C.p. 450. The genes CrtA and CrtB map only 0.5 map units from each other while CrtA and CrtC map 2.1 map units from one another. Mutants which accumulate end products but which lack certain precursors indicate a branched pathway for pigment biosynthesis exists in this organism. Media for the formation, fusion and regeneration of C. poinsettiae protoplasts are reported and a protocol for the use of these media in genetic ...
Date: August 1986
Creator: Campbell, Alan L. (Alan Lee)

Radial Compression High Performance Liquid Chromatography as a Tool for The Measurement of Endogenous Nucleotides in Bacteria

Description: High performance liquid chromatography was used to measure ribonucleoside triphosphates in microbial samples. Anion exchange columns in a radial compression module were used to separate and quantify purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides. Endogenous ribonucleoside triphosphates were extracted from Escherichia coli and pseudomonas aeruginosa using three different solvents, namely trifluorocetic acid (TFA; 0.5M), trichloroacetic acid (TCA; 6 per cent w/v) and formic acid (1.0M) Extracts were assayed for uridine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), and guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) by using anion exchange radial compression high performance (pressure) liquid chromatography. The three extraction produres were compared for yield of triphosphates. E. coli, the TFA extraction procedure was more sensitive and reliable than TCA and formic acid extraction procedures, but , in P. aeruginosa, the best yields of ATP and GTP were obrained following extraction with TFA. Yields of UTP and CTP increased when extraction was performed in TCA. These data illustrate that different extraction produres produce different measures for different triphosphates, a point often overlooked.
Date: August 1986
Creator: Dutta, Probir Kumar

Comparative Ecology of Benthic Communities in Natural and Regulated Areas of the Flathead and Kootenai Rivers, Montana

Description: A comparative study was made of environmental variables and the density, biomass, diversity, and species composition of macroinvertebrates in areas downstream from a dam with a hypolimnetic release (Hungry Horse Dam on the Flathead River) and a dam with a selective withdrawal system (Libby Dam on the Kootenai River). A major objective of this study was to examine the response of macroinvertebrate communities to defined environmental gradients in temperature, flow, substrate, and food-related variables (periphyton, particulate organic carbon in the seston). In addition, the effects of experimental manipulations in discharge on macroinvertebrate drift and stranding were assessed, and the effects of temperature on the growth rates and emergence of five species of insects were measured.
Date: May 1984
Creator: Perry, Sue A.

Genetic and Morphological Variation in Natural Populations of the Red Shiner, Notropis lutrensis, and their Relationship to Adaptation in a Generalist Species

Description: Twenty-two natural populations of the red shiner minnow, Notropis lutrensis were examined for morphological and genetic variation. This research was aimed at testing the hypothesis that morphological and genetic variation was primarily influenced by the degree of gene flow between populations. Ten linear measurements were taken from each of 1320 specimens. Morphological characters were adjusted for differential growth by least squares linear regression techniques. Genetic variability was estimated for each individual red shiner through the methods of starch gel electrophoresis. Twenty presumtive gene loci were resolved.
Date: May 1984
Creator: Wooten, Michael Conrad

Chemically Active Odorants as Olfactory Probes

Description: The initial step in odor recognition by the nose is the binding of odorant molecules to receptor sites embedded in the dendritic membranes of olfactory receptor cells. Despite considerable interest and experimentation into the nature of these receptor sites, little is known of their specificity to different types of odorant molecules. This lack of knowledge partially stems from the fact that the nature of receptor proteins is most effectively studied when specific and irreversible inhibitors are available for use as chemical probes, yet no such agents have been discovered for use in the olfactory system. A series of alkylating agents and other chemically active odorants were tested to determine whether they might react with specific odorant receptors and modify olfactory responses. Electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings were obtained before, during, and after treatment of the olfactory mucosae of grass frogs (Rana pipiens) with a chemically active odorant.
Date: May 1982
Creator: Criswell, Darrell W. (Darrell Wayne)