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Capriccio, By Richard Strauss and Clemens Krauss: Theoretical Discussion as Theatrical Presentation, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Strauss, Wagner, Verdi, Mozart, Britten, and Prokofiev

Description: In Capriccio. Richard Strauss and Clemens Krauss examine the very nature of opera with the core of their thesis being the relationship of words and music. A work that is, in essence, an extended discussion poses two problems to the composer and librettist: how to sustain the argument of the thesis without losing the attention of the audience, and how to prevent a conversational opera from sounding like endless recitative. Strauss and Krauss manage to present their case without having to resort to an actual discussion for the duration of the opera. Their characters are engaging, identifiable human beings who are also allegorical figures. Their participation in the stage action sustains the argument of the thesis even when the dialogue itself addresses other subjects. The players symbolize various facets of opera, theatre, and the public with all of them, principal and secondary characters, being sharply etched. The little stage action that Capriccio does contain is carefully paced and closely coordinated with the presentation of the work's thesis. The octets, similar in dramatic function to the central finale of a Mozart opera buffa, provide the climax of the stage action and come soon after the Fugal Debate, the centerpiece of the collaborators' argument. The final section of the central scene, which also contains the aforementioned octets and Fugal Debate, serves as the denouement of both the plot and thesis. Such close attention to dramatic structure gives Capriccio and the argument it presents cohesion and dramatic shape. The text itself is written in clear, concise prose and is set in Strauss's patented "conversational style." This style, a rapid syllabic declamation, is delivered "mezza voce" in order to simulate natural speech and is sung over continuous melos in the orchestra. This accompaniment keeps it from sounding like dry recitative. This study explores the ...
Date: August 1986
Creator: Saunders, David Harold

An Examination of Two Sextets of Carlos Chávez, Toccata for Percussion Instruments and Tambuco for Six Percussion Players

Description: This lecture-recital deals with the two percussion sextets of Carlos Chavez. Each of the compositions is analyzed by examining compositional characteristics and performance problems. The selection, substitution, and construction of the necessary instruments for performance are explored. Suggestions for stage set-up are also included. The percussion ensemble has become an integral part of most high school and university percussion programs. Much of the literature composed for this medium has not become part of the standard literature. Chlvez's Toccata has obtained its place in the literature—it is one of the most often performed percussion works in the world. Although Tambuco has not yet attained the same status as Toccata, it is, nevertheless, an important contribution to the literature. An attempt is also made to identify the significance of these works by examining some of the early influences on Chavez's compositional style both from his native Mexico, and from other composers writing for percussion ensembles.
Date: August 1986
Creator: Peterman, Timothy J. (Timothy James)

A Neglected Clarinet Concerto by Ludwig August Lebrun: A Performing Edition with Critical Commentary: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Other Recitals

Description: The present study makes available a modern performing edition of an eighteenth-centyry clarinet concerto. Written by the Mannheim oboist and composer Ludwig August Lebrun, the Concerto in B-flat for solo clarinet and orchestra has existed solely as a set of manuscript parts for over 200 years. The following chapters present biographical information on Ludwig August Lebrun as an oboist and composer of the late eighteenth century, the historical background of Lebrun's Concerto in B-flat. a thematic and harmonic analysis of the concerto's three movements, and a summary of the procedures followed in preparing the present edition of orchestral parts and piano reduction. Contemporaneous sources which provided pertinent performance practice information in the areas of articulation and ornamentation are also discussed. A copy of the piano reduction and orchestral performing parts are included in the appendices.
Date: August 1986
Creator: Duhaime, Ricky Edward

An Examination of Two Significant Percussion Compositions: Karlheinz Stockhausen's Zyklus and Ingolf Dahl's Duettino Concertante, a Lecture Recital Together with Five Recitals of Selected Works of A. Ginastera, A. Wilder, W. Kraft, and Others

Description: Zvklus (1959) by Karlheinz Stockhausen and Duettino Concertante (1966) by Ingolf Dahl represent two of the most significant percussion compositions that present the percussionist as soloist. The performer of these works, either unaccompanied or accompanied by a non-percussion instrument, is featured as executant, interpreter, and improvisor. They are regarded as classics in the medium of multiple percussion because of their frequency of performance and their profound effect on notation, musical composition, and the technical expectations of the percussionist. This paper examines these compositions and their historical significance to both percussion literature and the percussionist. Each of these compositions is analzyed by examining instrumentation, compositional procedures, and performance problems. Finally, the notational procedures and role of the performer in these compositions are compared. A discussion of the development of the percussion batterie, percussion ensemble, and the important early solo multiple percussion compositions provides historical perspective for these compositions. This perspective is enhanced by consideration of biography, influences, and stylistic development of each composer.
Date: December 1987
Creator: Carney, Michael R. (Michael Reed), 1952-

The Nineteenth-Century German Tradition of Solo Trombone Playing: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of E. Bozza, W. Hartley, A. Frackenpohl, A. Pryor. G. Frescobaldi. L. Grondahl, P. Bonneau and Others

Description: This study deals with trombone soloists and music of nineteenth-century Germany. Much of the discussion is based on the influence of two trombone virtuosos, Carl Traugott Queisser (1800-1846) and Friedrich August Belcke (1795- 1874) . Finally, a style and form analysis is given of several representative trombone compositions of the period. These include Ferdinand David's Concertino. Op. 4, Friedebald Grafe's Concerto. and Josef Serafin Alschausky's Concerto No. I.
Date: August 1989
Creator: Wolfinbarger, Steve M.

Historical and Analytical Aspects of William Flackton's Sonatas for Viola and Keyboard (OPUS 2. Nos. 2, 4. 6. 8) with Particular Attention to the Sonata in D Maior (OPUS 2. No. 4)

Description: These four sonatas of William Flackton (1709-1798) are probably the earliest collection of sonata literature written for the viola. They exist with a few other string sonatas from the Baroque period in England. It is essential to establish their place in English baroque music and to develop a performance milieu or stylistic preference that leads up to and lasts through the time span of Flackton's sonatas. The final tool to establish an interpretive plan will be to present a general analysis of the four sonatas with special emphasis on the D major sonata (opus 2, no. 4).
Date: December 1991
Creator: Rosenbaum, George G. (George Gene)

Aspects of Performance in Three Works for Piano and Tape : Larry Austin's Sonata Concertante, Thomas Clark's Peninsula, and Phil Winsor's Passages

Description: This dissertation primarily concerns performance aspects in compositions for piano and tape, using three specific works as the basis for discussion: Larry Austin's Sonata Concertante, Thomas Clark's Peninsula, and Phil Winsor's Passages. These compositions are representative of the medium as a whole, yet each offers its own unique set of performance problems.
Date: May 1993
Creator: Brandenburg, Octavia

A Historical Survey of Woodwind Doubling and A Form/Style Analysis of Four Works for Doubler and Wind Ensemble, a Lecture Recital together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by W.A. Mozart. A. Glazounov. P. Tate. A. Szalowski. A. Copland and Others

Description: Four works are selected to demonstrate the stature and demands of this craft and to represent a pinnacle in the art of contemporary woodwind doubling. Concerto for Doubles, by Thomas Filas, Concerto Tri-Chroma. by Michael Kibbe, Rhapsody Nova, by Clare Fischer and Suite for Solo Flute. Clarinet and Alto Saxophone by Claude Smith all represent rare, major solo works written specifically for three individual woodwind doublers. The paper will begin with a history of the practice of woodwind doubling from the fifteenth century to the present. The four works will then be examined by considering form, style and related performance practices.
Date: May 1993
Creator: Thompson, Phil A.

Joan Tower's Hexachords for Solo Flute: an Analysis and Comparison of its Flute Writing to Tower's Flute Concerto with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Vivaldi, Rivier, Mozart, Davidowsky, and Others

Description: This dissertation discusses two flute works by Joan Tower (born 1938). The performance medium consists of flute alone, Hexachords for Solo Flute (1972), and flute and orchestra, the Flute Concerto (1989). The discussion on Hexachords consists of a theoretical analysis; discussion on the Flute Concerto pertains to Tower's flute writing through an investigation into her musical language and specific performance techniques. Numerous examples are included to illustrate various aspects of Tower's style. Conclusions follow. The purpose of the paper is, first, to illustrate that basic knowledge of the twelve-tone method can bring a composition out of uncertainty for the performer and allow him to present what is unique within it. Secondly, it is to investigate the stylistic maturation of Joan Tower's flute works. In order to facilitate a better understanding of Tower's music and to provide commentary about the performance of each work, the writer has quoted from personal interviews with the composer and with flutists Carol Wincenc and Patricia Spencer, to whom the works are dedicated.
Date: May 1993
Creator: Jones, Margo S.

The Multi-percussion Writing of William Kraft in his Encounters Series With Three Recitals of Selected Works of Erb, Ptaszynska, Redel, Serry, and Others

Description: The paper is divided into six chapters. The first two provide a brief summary of the evolution of multiple percussion and biographical information about Kraft. The remaining chapters are an examination of the origin, sound sources, compositional style, and performance problems of the ten Encounters pieces. The paper concludes with several appendices, including a chronological listing of Kraft's compositions which use percussion, a list of percussion equipment and notational symbols used in the Encounters pieces, and a discography of Kraft's music.
Date: May 1993
Creator: Bridwell, Barry D.

Structure and Performance of El Polifemo de Oro for Solo Guitar by Reginald Smith Brindle

Description: El Polifemo de Oro was written in 1956 and revised by the composer in 1981. This two-fold investigation clarifies the structure of El Polifemo through careful analysis of the work and its revision, and by Smith Brindle's approach to composition based on his interviews and books. The second aspect is aimed toward the pragmatic performance issues of tempo, articulation, timbre, voice leading, and the other details of execution. Although the work was written according to serial techniques, the presence, in the twelve-note row, of triadic formations (minor triad, dominant seventh, fully-diminished seventh) juxtaposed with many tritone intervals suggests the use of tonal devices, which Smith Brindle does employ to effect tension and relaxation. It is assumed that tonal devices such as leading tones, stepwise movement in the bass, fourth and fifth relationships, and triadic constructions are heard against a traditional contextual basis and are therefore ways of implying resolution. Where tonal devices are not present, other structural components, i.e., rhythm, dynamics, timbre, etc., are examined with regard to their functions in creating or dissipating tension. Following the analysis of each of the four fragments is a discussion of performance implications based on the analysis. Both the analysis and performance aspects are non-prescriptive and are presented in the spirit that there are many other valid interpretations.
Date: May 1993
Creator: LeBlanc, Paul G.

An Examination of the Percussion Writing in the Chamber Works of George Crumb, 1960-1980 with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Bergsma, Kurka, Miyoshi, Niimi, Takemitsu, and Others

Description: In this study, the unique style of percussion writing in the chamber works of George Crumb, written between 1960 and 1980, is examined. The principal aspects examined within this study include: the extended instrumental techniques, the use of percussion within the musical imagery, soloistic treatment, compositional and notational procedures, and specific performance problems pertaining to the chamber work Songs, Drones, and Refrains of Death.
Date: August 1993
Creator: LedBetter, Robert B.

The Influence of Bela Bartok on Symmetry and Instrumentation in George Crumb's Music for a Summer Evening with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Abe, Berio, Dahl, Kessner, Miki, Miyoshi, and Others

Description: The purpose of this document is to investigate the influence of Bela Bartok's music, specifically the Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion, on George Crumb's Music for a Summer Evening. It concentrates on two specific areas: 1) the role of symmetry and 2) instrumentation. These two items were stressed during an interview with Crumb by the author, which is appended to the paper.
Date: August 1993
Creator: Kingan, Michael Gregory

Kurt Weill: a Song Composer in Wartime with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Mozart, Strauss, Bach, Schubert, and Others

Description: During World War II the composer Kurt Weill was in America writing for the Broadway stage. On August 27, 1943, he became an American citizen and was eager to volunteer his talent to the American war effort. Among his many wartime musical contributions are fourteen songs, all with war-related texts, which can be divided into three distinct groups: the American propaganda songs (8), the German propaganda songs (2), and the Walt Whitman songs (4). It is the purpose of this paper to present a comparative analysis of a representative group of these war songs (two from each group) in order to illustrate Weill's musical versatility. The American propaganda songs were written in a purely popular song style; sung by Broadway actors; directed toward an American audience; with texts by the Broadway lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II and the Hollywood movie executive Howard Dietz. The German propaganda songs were written in a cabaret song style; sung in German by Weill's wife, Lotte Lenya; directed toward a German audience behind enemy lines; with texts by the German playwright Bertolt Brecht and the German cabaret writer Walter Mehring. The Four Walt Whitman Songs were written in a classical art song style; sung by classically trained singers; directed toward a general audience; with texts by the nineteenth-century American poet Walt Whitman. After an initial discussion of Weill's early musical training and career in Europe, his exile from Germany, his reception in America, and his contributions to the American war effort, each group of war songs is analyzed musically, textually, vocally, in reference to the audience to whom it was directed, and with regards to vocal performance practice. Comparisons and conclusions are then drawn. Kurt Weill's war songs are valuable for musical study, both in terms of examining his ability to write equally well in various ...
Date: August 1993
Creator: Wyatt, Susan Beth Masters

The Solo Vocal Collections of Gerald R. Finzi Suitable for Performance by the High Male Voice, a lecture recital together with three recitals of selected works of J.S. Bach, H. Wolf, R. Vaughan Williams, A. Jolivet, F.J. Haydn, J. Brahms, L.V. Beethoven, R. Strauss, J.P. Rameau, M. Ravel, S. Barber, G. Faure

Description: A primary purpose of the study was to articulate the significance of these compositions to the twentieth century repertoire, with special attention given to Dies Natalis, recognized as an outstanding contribution to English music literature. Overviews and specific analyses, with pertinent performance applications and background data, fulfill this purpose and provide information of merit for the programming and performance of Finzi's songs for high male voice.
Date: August 1993
Creator: Germany, Samuel R.

Art Song by Turn-of-the-Century Female Composers

Description: Whereas conditions have existed for many centuries which served to exclude or marginalize female participation in music, many women have written compositions of musical worth sufficient to justify their contemporary performance. Although most women composers wrote works more fitting for the "salon" than for the concert hall at the turn of the century, Boulanger and Mahler are representative of the few women composers whose complex approach to art song fell within the mainstream of the genre. Many of their accompaniments attain a level of technical difficulty not previously found in women composers' writing. They offer an interesting comparison between nationalities and styles in that they both favored Symbolist texts. However, each represents a different side of the coin in her musical interpretation of Symbolism: Boulanger, Impressionism, and Mahler, Expressionism. In addition, even though their styles involve opposite musical expressions, they both show a strong influence of Wagner in their writing. This study includes background on turn-of-the-century music and musicians encompassing the role of art song among women composers. Symbolism is addressed as it applies to the poets selected by the composers, followed by information regarding the specific musical representation of Symbolist texts in the composers' art songs. The chapter of analysis serves as a means to guide musical decisions in the actual performance of the works. The conclusion briefly discusses performance practice issues and the possibility of a turn-of-the-century feminine aesthetic.
Date: December 1993
Creator: Click, Sarah, D.

French Accompanied Keyboard Music from Mondonville's Opus III to Mondonville's Opus V: The Birth of a Genre, a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Back, F. Couperin, G. Frescobaldi, W.A. Mozart, C. Balbastre, D. Scarlatti, J.P. Rameau and Others

Description: In mid-eighteenth-century France, a type of ensemble music was introduced for harpsichord and another instrument(s) in which the harpsichord part is completely written out, instead of a bass line with figures to be realized. Composers of this genre used the word "accompanied" in the tides or in the prefaces of their collections to describe the genre. This study examines the earliest examples of this genre, the works of seven composers, published in the 1740's, (Mondonville, Rameau, Boismoitier, Clement, Dupuits, Guillemain, and Luc Marchand), and compares the various styles of the written out parts, both harpsichord and additional instrument, to determine the nature of the word, "accompaniment."
Date: December 1993
Creator: Patterson, Yumi Uchikoda

Practical Aspects of Playing Domenico Scarlatti's Keyboard Sonatas on the Guitar, a Lecture Recital, together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by W.A. Mozart, M. Ponce, A. Vivaldi, J.S. Bach, J. Turina and Others

Description: The ornamentation in the keyboard sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti is investigated in light of evidence from late seventeenth and early eighteenth century Spanish treatises and collections. Additionally, calligraphic and statistical evidence from the earliest known manuscripts and printed source for the keyboard sonatas is explored. The study is focused on three ornaments--the appoggiatura, trill, and tremulo--and concludes that: the appoggiaturas in this repertoire were short unless cadential or present in a cantabile tempo, in which case they could be one-third to two-thirds the value of the resolution note; trills were begun on the main note unless preceded by a grace note; tremulo was usually an alternation of a main note with its lower neighbor note and this ornament is normally indicated at points of harmonic prolongation. The last chapter discusses general approaches to arranging these works for the guitar and the specific influence of ornamentation on the performance of the sonatas on guitar. Details from eight sonatas arranged for the guitar are used to exemplify the conclusions of the research.
Date: May 1994
Creator: Quantz, Michael O.

A Study of Sonata a Quattro K. 347 and Alma Redemptoris Mater K. 186 by Johann Joseph Fux: the Historical Significance as Works for Alto Trombone and Performance Considerations, a Lecture Recital together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by J. Albrechtsberger, R. Gregson, W. Hartley, E. Bozza, Lars-Erik Larsson, A. Pryor and Others

Description: Johann Joseph Fux's influence on the development of eighteenth-century alto trombone literature is significant. His music, when compared with that of other composers who wrote for the alto trombone before 1730, reveals a more elaborate and frequent use of the instrument. Many of Fux's compositions call for alto, tenor, or bass trombone, but his Sonata a Quattro K. 347 and Alma Redemptoris Mater K. 186 are of particular interest in regard to the composer's treatment of the alto trombone. This study points out the technical demands placed on the trombonist in Fux's works as compared to such contemporary composers as Antonio Caldara and Marc'Antonio Ziani. The primary goal of this study is to substantiate the importance of Fux's role in the development of the alto trombone repertoire. Published and unpublished works by Fux that significantly incorporate the instrument have been studied and compared to compositions of his contemporaries. A thorough discussion of Sonata a Quattro and Alma Redemptoris Mater illustrates the technical aspects of his alto trombone writing. The secondary goal of this study is to create a performing edition of Sonata a Quattro and Alma Redemptoris Mater. The existing editions in Denkmaler der Tonkunst in Osterreich and Johann Joseph Fux, Samtliche Werke are less than complete. There are no individual parts for performers, and tempo indications for several movements are missing. Mistakes in the parts of Sonata a Quattro and discrepancies between the figured bass and continuo realization have been corrected for the creation of a new edition. Tempo, ornamentation, instruments, and articulation are also discussed to assist in the presentation of an historically informed performance of the Sonata a Quattro and Alma Redemptoris Mater.
Date: May 1994
Creator: Babcock, Ronald D. (Ronald Dean)

A Study of the Oboe Concertos of Johann Friedrich Fasch with a Performing Edition of Oboe Concerto in G Major (Küntzel 8) : A Lecture Recital Together with Three Other Recitals of Selected Works of Handel, Mozart, Bellini, Poulenc, Britten and Others

Description: Johann Friedrich Fasch's music displays a stylistic variability characteristic among some composers of the early eighteenth century, a time in which the mature Baroque style period of Western art music was beginning to show new elements of the Classical style. Opinions regarding Fasch's contribution vary from praise for his role as one of the most important pioneers to simple acknowledgment as merely one among many significant, forward-looking, transitional composers. During the early eighteenth century, a wealth of fine literature for solo oboe was produced. Current oboe repertoire includes many standard, mature Baroque concertos of the early eighteenth century; few works representative of evolutionary compositions hinting toward the development of a new historical style period are available. The primary purpose of the lecture recital is to introduce to the oboe repertoire an edition of a concerto by Fasch, one representative of the transition from Baroque to Classical eras.
Date: May 1994
Creator: Manning, Dwight C. (Dwight Carroll)

The School Fugue: Its Place in the Organ Repertoire of the French Symphonic School, a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, D. Buxtehude, C. Franck, P. Eben, F. Mendelssohn, R. Schumann, M. Reger and Others

Description: This study focuses on the central role which fugue d'ecole, as defined and taught by the post-revolutionary Conservatoire de Paris, played in re-establishing standards of excellence in organ composition and aiding the development of the French Symphonic Organ School. An examination of counterpoint and fugue treatises by Cherubini, Dubois, and Gedalge reveals the emergence of a specific school fugue form, intended for academic purposes only, as a means to instilling discipline and honing the technical skills required in all forms of musical composition.
Date: August 1994
Creator: Mulvey, Margaret N.

The Trumpet in Selected Solo and Chamber Works of Paul Hindemith : Elements of Trumpet Technique and Their Relationship to the Gebrauchsmusik Concept, a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.N. Hummel, A. Jolivet, C. Chaynes, and Others

Description: The trumpet was one of the wind instruments Hindemith used frequently in his chamber music, and he employed it prominently in five works from 1925 to 1954. These works are the Sonate fur Trompete (1939), the Konzert fur Trompete in B und Fagott mit Streichorchester (1954), Drei Stucke (19251 the Septett fur Blasinstrumente (1949), and "Morgenmusik," from the collection Plöner Musiktag (1932). This study examines and compares Hindemith's writing for the trumpet in these selected works, noting features in his use of the instrument which determine the applicability of the works to the Gebrauchsmusik concept.
Date: August 1994
Creator: Bogard, Rick