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The Serenades and Divertimenti of Mozart

Description: This study has two divisions: Part I, an historical and analytical summary of the emergence and development of the divertimento and the serenade in the eighteenth century, and Part II, the culmination of these structures in the works of W. A. Mozart. Two primary purposes are envisioned: 1) to further our knowledge of how German Gesellshafts-musik evolved toward its peak in the second half of the eighteenth century, and 2) to furnish a useful analytical handbook of Mozart's works in these genres.
Date: June 1960
Creator: Gibson, O. Lee (Oscar Lee)

The British Museum Manuscript Additional 35087: A Transcription of the French, Italian, and Latin Compositions with Concordance and Commentary

Description: The London British Museum Manuscript Additional 35087, hereafter referred to as London Add. 35087, is an important parchment manuscript in large octavo choirbook arrangement from the beginning of the sixteenth century. Its measurements are 19.4 x 29.3 centimeters. The manuscript contains ninety-five folios and one stub where a leaf has been torn out (f. 4).1 The last composition in the manuscript is incomplete, which indicates that one leaf is lacking at the end (f. 96). Two sets of foliation are shown: the original Roman and a more recent Arabic. Both are placed in the upper right hand corner of folio recto. The sets agree in folios 4-93. Folios 1 and 2 show no Roman figures now; folio 3 has "ii," and therefore the missing leaf probably had "iii." The Arabic numbering does not account for this missing leaf. This folio might have been assigned "4," but this number is given on the next complete leaf to coincide with the Roman "iiii." At the end, by mistake, folio 94 has "xciii" and folio 95 has "xciiii."
Date: August 1967
Creator: McMurtry, William M.

Florence, Biblioteca del Conservatorio di Musica Luigi Cherubini, Manuscript Basevi 2439: Critical Edition and Commentary

Description: The subject of the present study, Florence, Biblioteca del Conservatorio di Musica Luigi Cherubini, MS Basevi 2439, abbreviated Florence 2439,1 contains secular and sacred vocal music of the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, with texts in French, Dutch, Italian, and Latin.
Date: June 1968
Creator: Newton, Paul George, 1930-

Music and its Relation to Futurism, Cubism, Dadaism, and Surrealism, 1905 to 1950

Description: Inasmuch as this investigator can determine, no major study has been done concerning music's relation to the "isms" selected for this discussion. The contemporary interest in the movements themselves has been so widespread that the documentation of them, in scattered accounts, is enormous. It is disappointing that these records provide little or no information about the musical aspects of the movements; the graphic and literary accounts, on the other hand, have been accorded generous treatments. Since futurism, cubism, and surrealism, in their origins, were oriented toward the visual and literary arts, it is not surprising that these two aspects would receive the greatest amount of attention. The meager attention to music and the distortion of its role in the movements, as has largely been the case, has created an artistic imbalance, This writer's efforts have been directed toward an exhaustive search for factors which have, in some way or other, linked music with these movements. Musical futurism has been the easiest to identify, although its underlying theories are not always clear, since the futurists, in explaining their theories, were not always convincing, perhaps even to themselves. This writer's main attempt has been to interpret ideas that were frequently vague and poorly explained to begin with. It will become evident to the reader, in the case of the dadaists, and to some extent the surrealists, the provocative nature of their activities was deliberately designed to create incomprehension, incoherency, and confusion.
Date: January 1969
Creator: Greer, Thomas H. (Thomas Henry), 1916-

Chopin's Mazurka: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, F. Busoni, D. Scarlatti, W.A. Mozart, L.V. Beethoven, F. Schubert, F. Chopin, M. Ravel and K. Szymanowski

Description: This dissertation consists of four programs: one lecture- recital, two recitals for piano solo, and one (the Schubert program) in combination with other instruments. The repertoire of the complete series of concerts was chosen with the intention of demonstrating the ability of the performer to project music of various types and composed in different periods.
Date: August 1969
Creator: Drath, Jan

Three Recitals of Music by German and Danish Composers, J.S. Bach, and Contemporary North American Composers, and a Lecture Recital on the Registration of Orchestral Textures in Organ Music

Description: Four contrasting recitals were presented to fulfill the requirements for the degree Doctor of Musical Arts. The first recital contained music of miscellaneous composers. Two Preludes and Fugues by the North German Baroque composers Vincent Libeck and Dietrich Buxtehude were separated by Samuel Scheidt's Variations on the Netherlands folk song "Ach du feiner Reiter". The Brahms Chorale Prelude "0 wie selig seid ihr doch, ihr Frommen" and the Louis Vierne "Intermezzo" from the Third Symphony represented Romantic-style composition. The major work of the program was the Carl Nielsen Commotio, a large work in orchestral style. The second recital consisted completely of music by J. S. Bach. Four works of contrasting styles were presented: Concerto, Opus 3, No. 8, composed by Antonio Vivaldi and transcribed by Bach, Partita on Sie gegrisset, Jesu gtig, Sonata IV, and Fantasy and Fugue in G Minor. The third recital was the lecture recital: Registration of Orchestral Textures in Organ Music. This lecture was an attempt to deal with the contemporary problem in performance practice of registration of Romantic organ music. The trends in organ building in the twentieth century have ranged from a deeper exploration of the possibilities of the Romantic organ to the reevaluation of and rededication to principles of organ building popular in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
Date: August 1969
Creator: Haller, William P. (William Paul)

The Life and Works of Antonius Divitis

Description: Antonius Divitis (ca. L4715-ca. 1525) was born in Louvain, Belgium, and belonged to the generation between Josquin and Gombert. Divitis is listed in various sources as Antoine de Rycke, Le Riche, Davitz, Davtitz, and possibly Richardus Antonius, all of which mean "Anthony the Rich." His extant works include three complete masses, two parts of masses, three magnificats, five motets, two fragments (probably parts of motets) and one chanson. The purpose of this study was to collect, transcribe, and collate all existing manuscripts and prints of Divitis' compositions as well as biographical information about the composer, and to analyze the compositions for information about his techniques, as well as those of his contemporaries. Only two compositions came to the investigator in modern notation, with the remainder in various manuscripts and printed editions by such notable printers as Attaingnant, Gardane, Giunta, Petreius, Petrucci, Rhaw and Rotenbucher, from the first half of the sixteenth century. All variants in the sources were recorded and, in several instances, included in this edition wherever they seemed'to improve the musical readings.
Date: May 1970
Creator: Nugent, B. A.

The Life and Music of Jacques-Christophe Naudot

Description: Favorable judgment of a work of art, or of a man, usually means that the work of art, or a record of the man, will be preserved for future generations to judge for themselves. An unfavorable judgment may result in a richly deserved obscurity or an irreplaceable loss, unless favorable circumstances combine to preserve the evidence for a more perspicacious generation. One can be forgiven if he distrusts history's judgment; mistakes which have been corrected are legion (the case of J. S. Bach comes most vividly to mind) and skepticism is warranted unless or until the facts are available for confirmation. It is difficult to explain the paucity of information about Jacques-Christophe Naudot, Not that he is another J. S. Bach; neither Fleury, who made the first serious effort to revive interest in his music in the early 1920's, nor Ruf, who has done much in this regard recently, nor this writer makes any such claim. He does not, however, deserve the obscurity that has been his lot. If his music is not always profound, it nevertheless has both intrinsic and historical value, and some of his works reveal considerable contrapuntal skill. It may be that Naudot stood in the shadow of Blavet, whose prowess as a flutist bolstered his reputation as a composer, or that his music was never quite the right style for the time; in any case, although his name was not unknown, he never gained the fame that earned a contemporary biographer. As a result, no autographs and very little biographical data have been found, although one or more printed copies of all his known works, except two, are to be found in various libraries, principally the Bibliotheque National in Paris.
Date: June 1970
Creator: Underwood, T. Jervis (Troy Jervis), 1932-

The Earliest Trumpet Method Book Extant: A Lecture Recital; Together with Three Other Recitals

Description: This dissertation consists of four programs: one lecture recital, two recitals for solo trumpet, and one in combination with other instruments and voices. The lecture was an exploration of the contents of Modo per Imparare a Sonare di Tromba, by Girolamo Fantini, published in 16358. Fantini, who was also a trumpet player, included in his volume a wide variety of music for the natural trumpet. In addition to military signals and fanfares, the book contains exercises for developing technical ability on the trumpet, a large number of dance pieces with and without accompaniment, duets for two trumpets, and sonatas for trumpet and keyboard.
Date: May 1971
Creator: De Jong, William Donai, 1935-

Aaron Copland's Concerto for Clarinet: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Music by Mozart, Rossini, Schumann, Brahms, and Contemporary European and American Composers

Description: The dissertation consists of four recitals: one chamber music recital, two solo recitals, and one lecture recital. The repertoire of these programs was chosen with the intention of demonstrating the capability of the performer to deal with problems arising in works of varying types and of different historical periods. The lecture recital, Aaron Copland's Concerto for Clarinet, begins with biographical information, followed by a discussion of various other works of the composer and of important stylistic traits that are contained therein. After thus setting the Concerto in perspective to other major works, an investigation is made into various aspects of form and style which make the Concerto atypical in some respects to the composer t total body of works. Particular emphasis is given to rhythmic and melodic characteristics of the piece which are related to jazz and Latin-American popular music. The formal and stylistic analysis is followed by a discussion of problems involved in performing the Concerto with a piano reduction of the orchestral part, and the lecture concludes with a survey of interpretative problems posed by the work. At the conclusion of the lecture portion of the presentation, the Concerto was performed.
Date: August 1971
Creator: Bullock, Bruce Lloyd

Béla Bartók, Out of Doors: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of L.V. Beethoven, F. Chopin, J. Brahms, R. Schumann, G. Rochberg, S. Prokofieff, M. Ravel and Others

Description: The lecture recital was given January 31, 1971. A discussion of Bartok's Out of Doors, a suite consisting of five movements entitled "With Drums and Pipes," "Barcarolla," "Musettes," "The Night's Music," and "The Chase" included biographical material, general analysis of Bartok's musical style, and specific analysis of the suite itself. The suite was then performed by memory. In addition to the lecture recital three other public recitals were performed. Two of these consisted entirely of solo literature for the piano, and the other was a vocal chamber music recital. The first solo recital was on June 7, 1970, and included works of Alfredo Casella, Beethoven, Chopin, Brahms, and Bartok. Part of the preparation included the writing of program notes of a historical and analytical nature.The other solo program, on July 5, 1971, consisted entirely of twentieth-century works by George Rochberg, Sergei Prokofieff, and Maurice Ravel. The chamber music recital was performed with a visiting soprano, Jane Paul, on February 28, 1971. Emphasis was given to German Lieder by Schumann, Joseph Marx, and Alban Berg, but Spanish songs of the Renaissance, by Juan del Encina and Fuenllana, as well as a modern English song cycle by Peter Warlock were also programmed.
Date: August 1971
Creator: Kincaid, Desmond, 1931-

The Development of Woodwind Fingering Systems: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Solo and Ensemble Works for Bassoon

Description: The lecture-recital, The Development of Woodwind Fingering Systems, traces the evolution of devices for controlling the pitch produced by woodwind instruments from prehistoric times to the present. The addition of keys, and the evolution of collections of individual keys into coordinated systems is particularly stressed, as are the various physical, physiological, and cultural forces which determined the directions of development of these systems. The similarities between the fingerings of various woodwind instruments are explained, a system of numbers is introduced in order to clarify these similarities, and a projection of some possibilities for future development of woodwind fingering systems is offered.
Date: August 1971
Creator: Voorhees, Jerry Lee

Thema med Variationer, Opus 40, by Carl Nielsen: A Lecture Recital Two Solo Recitals Including Compositions of W. A. Mozart, F. Schubert, F. Chopin, A. Casella, and R. Muczynski A Chamber Music Recital Featuring Compositions for Clarinet, Viola and Piano, by W. A. Mozart, J. Brahms F. Busoni and A. Uhl

Description: The lecture recital, "Thema med Variationer, Opus 40, By Carl Nielsen" presented a discussion of the composer's general background and the characteristics of his style. Specific points made were related to the Thema med Variationer; the discussion was followed by a performance of the work in its entirety. In addition to the lecture recital, three other recital programs were organized and public concerts presented to provide the platform for the works studied. Two of these programs were of solo piano music and one was of chamber music with the clarinet and viola in partnership with the piano. All programs were recorded on magnetic recording tape. The spoken portion of the lecture recital in written form is filed with the recordings as a part of this dissertation.
Date: August 1971
Creator: Di Piazza, Gabriel, 1935-

Martin Agricola's 'Musica Instrumentalis Deudsch': A Translation

Description: The problem with which this investigation is concerned is that of presenting a concise English translation of the book which Martin Agricola wrote in 1528 in German on the musical instruments and practices of his time. In addition to the translation itself, there is a major section devoted to a comparison of the material of Musica instrumentalis deudsch with other books and treatises on the same and related subjects which were written at approximately the same time or within the next hundred years. Agricola states that the purpose of his book was to teach the playing of various instruments such as organs, lutes, harps, viols, and pipes. He also noted that the material was prepared expressly for young people to study. To facilitate the accomplishment of this purpose Agricola wrote the book in short, two-lined, rhymed couplets so that the youths might quickly memorize the material and thus retain the instructions better.
Date: May 1972
Creator: Hollaway, William W.

Brahms and the Character Piece: Emotion Guided by Intellect, a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Compositions by Beethoven, Brahms, Chopin, Debussy, Mozart, Prokofieff, and Ravel

Description: The lecture recital was given October 15, 1971. The subject of the discussion was Brahms and the Character Piece: Emotion Guided by Intellect, and it included historical and biographical information, an analysis of Brahms' romantic-classic style, a general analysis of the six character pieces in Opus 118, and performance of Opus 118 by memory. In addition to the lecture recital, three other public recitals were performed. These three programs were comprised of solo literature for the piano. The first solo recital was on April 15, 1971, and included works of Brahms, Chopin, Mozart, and Ravel. The second program, presented on April 28, 1972, featured several works of Beethoven. Performed on Septemhber 25, 1972, the third recital programmed compositions by Chopin, Debussy, and Prokofieff. Magnetic tape recordings of all four programs and the written lecture material are filed together as the dissertation.
Date: December 1972
Creator: Blocker, Robert L. (Robert Lewis), 1946-

Ludwig van Beethoven: 33 Variations on a Waltz by Diabelli, Op, 120, A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J. S. Bach, L. van Beethoven, R. Schumann, F. Chopin, F. Liszt, S. Prokofiev, and E. Granados

Description: The lecture recital was given December 5, 1971. A discussion of Beethoven's 33 Variations on a Waltz by Diabelli, Op. 120 included the circumstances under which the work was composed, analysis of the composition, and controversial opinions on the Variations. The piece was then performed by memory. In addition to the lecture recital three other public recitals were performed. These consisted entirely of solo literature for the piano. The first solo recital was on April 12, 1970, and included works of Bach, Beethoven, and Liszt. Part of the preparation included the writing of program notes of a historical and analytical nature. The second solo recital, on January 31, 1971, consisted entirely of sonatas by Beethoven, Chopin, and Prokofiev. The final solo program, on August 11, 1972, included works by Bach, Schumann, and Granados. All four programs were recorded on magnetic tape and are filed, along with the written version of the lecture material, as a part of the dissertation.
Date: December 1972
Creator: Da Roza, Natalia, 1940-

The Poetic Ideal in the Piano Music of Franz Liszt: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Music by Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Brahms, and Contemporary European and North American Composers

Description: The dissertation consists of four recitals: one chamber music recital, two solo recitals, and one lecture recital. The chamber music program included a trio with the violin and cello performing with the piano. The repertoire of all of the programs was intended to demonstrate a variety of types and styles of piano music from several different historical periods. The lecture recital, "The Poetic Ideal in the Piano Music of Franz Liszt," was an attempt to enter a seldomexplored area of Liszt's musical inspiration. So much has been written about the brilliant and virtuosic compositions which Liszt created to demonstrate his own technical prowess that it is easy to lose sight of the other side of his creative genius. Both as a composer and as an author, Liszt reiterated his belief in the fundamental kinship of music and the other arts. The visual arts of painting and sculpture were included, but he considered the closest relationship to be with literature, and especially with poetry.
Date: December 1972
Creator: Lawhon, Gladys Louise, 1911-

The Variations for Piano, Op. 27 of Anton Webern and the Quaderno musicale di Annalibera of Luigi Dallapiccola: A Lecture Recital, Together with Four Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, W.A. Mozart, F. Schubert, R. Schumann, J. Brahms, F. Chopin, A. Schoenberg, and M. Ravel

Description: The lecture recital was given on November 20, 1972. The discussion of Webern's Variations and Dallapiccola's Quaderno Musicale consisted of a analysis of the two works followed by a comparison of stylistic and performance aspects. The two works were then performed. In addition to the lecture recital four other public recitals were given. Two of these consisted entirely of solo literature for the piano. The third recital was a vocal chamber music recital and the fourth consisted of a piano concerto performed with an orchestra.
Date: May 1973
Creator: Bell, Digby

Dialogo della musica antica et della moderna of Vincenzo Galilei: Translation and Commentary

Description: The purpose of this study is to provide a practical English translation of Vincenzo Galilei's significant treatise on ancient and modern music (1581). In spite of the important place this work holds in the history of music, it has never before been made available in its entirety in any language other than the original Italian.
Date: August 1973
Creator: Herman, Robert H., 1934-

The Lute Books of Giulio Cesare Barbetta: A Polyphonic Transcription of the Composer's Complete Works and an Analysis of the Fourteen Fantasias Volume I

Description: The great number of musical sources preserved in manuscript and printed form clearly reflects the prominent position held by the lute as a musical instrument during the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Only a relatively small portion of this vast literature is presently available to scholars and interested laymen in the form of modern transcriptions. Referred to as "l'instrument noble par excellence," the lute's popular and fashionable appeal is evidenced by the large number of composers who dedicated themselves to this instrument. Among the number of outstanding lute composers living in Italy during the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries was Giulio Cesare Barbetta (c. 1540-after 1603). During his lifetime Barbetta published a total of four books of lute pieces containing arrangements of polyphonic compositions of various Renaissance composers as well as a large number of original compositions including .preludes, airs, fantasias, and dance pieces. Although Barbetta achieved importance as a leading figure in the Italian school of lute composition, there is little readily available material, either biographical or musical; this study provides the scholar, the performer, and the listener with biographical data and a modern edition of the composer's complete works.
Date: August 1973
Creator: Thomas, Benjamin W., 1937-

The Lute Books of Giulio Cesare Barbetta: A Polyphonic Transcription of the Composer's Complete Works and an Analysis of the Fourteen Fantasias Volume II

Description: The great number of musical sources preserved in manuscript and printed form clearly reflects the prominent position held by the lute as a musical instrument during the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Only a relatively small portion of this vast literature is presently available to scholars and interested laymen in the form of modern transcriptions. Referred to as "l'instrument noble par excellence," the lute's popular and fashionable appeal is evidenced by the large number of composers who dedicated themselves to this instrument. Among the number of outstanding lute composers living in Italy during the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries was Giulio Cesare Barbetta (c. 1540-after 1603). During his lifetime Barbetta published a total of four books of lute pieces containing arrangements of polyphonic compositions of various Renaissance composers as well as a large number of original compositions including .preludes, airs, fantasias, and dance pieces. Although Barbetta achieved importance as a leading figure in the Italian school of lute composition, there is little readily available material, either biographical or musical; this study provides the scholar, the performer, and the listener with biographical data and a modern edition of the composer's complete works.
Date: August 1973
Creator: Thomas, Benjamin W., 1937-

Some Aspects of the French Organ Symphony: Culminating in the Symphonie Passion of Marcel Dupré: Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of D. Buxtehude, J.S. Bach, N. Dello-Joio, P. Hindemith, S. Karg-Elert, J. Langlais, W. Latham, F. Liszt, N. Lockwood, F. Martin, D. Pinkham, L. Sowerby, and L. Vierne

Description: The lecture recital was given July 10, 1973. The Symphonie-Passion by Marcel Dupre was performed following a lecture on various factors that influenced the development of the organ symphony in France. In addition to the lecture recital, three other public recitals were performed, including solo compositions for the organ and three chamber works for organ and instruments. The first solo recital, including works of J. S. Bach, P. Hindemith, L. Sowerby, and L. Vierne, was performed on June 4, 1969. On April 17, 1970 the second solo recital was performed. Compositions by J. S. Bach, D. Buxtehude, M. Duprd, N. Dello Joio, S. Karg--Elert, and J. Langlais were included in the program. On January 25, 1971, a program of organ chamber works by N. Lockwood, D. Pinkham, and F. Martin, as well as solo works by F. Lizst, W. Latham, and Marcel Duprl, was performed. The four programs were recorded on magnetic tape and are filed with the written version of the lecture as a part of the dissertation.
Date: August 1973
Creator: Kean, Patricia June (Patricia June Forman), 1933-

Keyboard Tablatures of the Mid-Seventeenth Century in the Royal Library, Copenhagen: Edition and Commentary

Description: In the history of seventeenth-century European music the court of Christian IV (r. 1588-1648) occupies a position of prominence. Christian, eager for fame as a patron of the arts, drew to Denmark many of the musical giants of the age, among them the lutenist John Dowland and the composer Heinrich Schltz. Sadly, except for financial records and occasional letters still in the archives, few traces remain of these brilliant years in Denmark. The music composed and played during this half century has largely disappeared, most of it probably in the tragic fire of 1794 that destroyed the old Christiansborg Castle in Copenhagen and with it the court music archives. Except for the recently-discovered Clausholm Fragments, only three specimens of keyboard music from the period remain: Ny kgl. Saml. 1997 fol. (Obmaus Tablature), Gl. kgl. Saonl. 376 fol. (Copenhagen Tablature), and mu 6703.2131/6 (VoigtlaJnder Tablature). It has generally been assumed that the manuscripts were of German origin. The present study, however, demonstrates a probable Danish origin for the third, possible Danish connections for the second, and establishes that the first is of Austrian provenance. The Obmaus Tablature is an amateur's preservation of a German keyboard style already outdated. This slender manuscript, dated 1637, contains a total of ten "archaic" pieces exhibiting the peculiarities of keyboard dances and song settings from the late sixteenth century. The awkward style of the pieces leads to the conclusion that they were transcribed for keyboard--more literally than imaginatively--from lute originals. The Copenhagen Tablature, consisting of thirty-four folios, is of primary importance for its evidence of the spread of the French claveqin style and the development of the keyboard suite. Of the sixty-nine pieces the majority are French dance forms, several with doubles; also included are preludes, German dances, and settings of chorales, psalms, and secular songs. ...
Date: December 1973
Creator: Dickinson, Alis